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Balloon-powered Internet for everyone.
Introduction
Project Loon is a network of balloons traveling on the edge of space, designed to provide Internet coverage for people in rural and remote areas, help fill in coverage gaps and bring people back online after disasters. google.com/loon

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One of Project Loon’s earliest Eureka moments was the idea that we could provide continuous Internet connection not by keeping balloons stationary over a given location (which would require lots and lots of energy to work against the wind) but by coordinating a fleet of balloons to work with the wind, such that when one balloon leaves a location another moves into its place to continue providing connectivity. In theory, this means that any individual balloon would provide connection in one place and then, days later, provide connection at another location at the opposite end of the world. In our latest long distance LTE test this is exactly what we achieved!

Launched from New Zealand, our globe-connecting balloon made the first leg its journey travelling 9000 km over the Pacific Ocean. Approaching our test location in Chile at a speed of 80 km/h, a command was sent for the balloon to rise into a wind pattern that slowed it down to a quarter of its speed, allowing it to drift overhead members of the Loon operations team who were able to connect to the balloon via smartphones on our test-partner mobile network. 

Hanging around for half an hour to complete the connection testing, the balloon was then sent off on the winds over the South Atlantic ocean towards its next test location, over 10,000 km away in Australia! Our balloon completed this second leg of the journey in just 8 days, travelling over 1000 km per day and reaching a top speed of 140 km/h while whizzing over the ocean south of Africa. Once at the east coast of Australia the Loon Mission Control team implemented a series of altitude maneuvers to catch different winds and reverse the balloon path, lining it up to directly overfly our test location. Having travelled over 20,000 km around the world the balloon flew overhead at a ground distance of less than 500 meters away from our target (well within the 40,000 meter radius required for connection) to provide over 2 hours of Internet connection. That level of precision is like hitting a hole-in-one in golf from over 4 km away!

Tests like this give us real insight into how Project Loon can work at scale. With more balloons in the stratosphere and more Telco partners around the world capable of supporting Loon internet traffic, our ability to provide continuous connection in rural and remote areas will only increase. 
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Cynthia Eloísa Rivera Bustamante's profile photoJon Swabey's profile photoTom Rios's profile photoGenevieve Victoria Kayat's profile photo
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It wel come to afghanistan???????
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Welcome all to the inaugural Golden Balloon Awards 2014!

We are taking this opportunity to look at some of the greatest feats achieved by our Loon balloons as we wind our way to the end of 2014 and finish landing our fleet for analysis and upgrade. From frosty temperatures to country hoppers, speed demons to masters of endurance, we take a look at some of the records from the project to date. Here we go…

#1 The Marathoner - Launched from New Zealand in July 2014, the Marathoner just kept going and going, reaching 134 days aloft before being brought down to land in Chile. Constantly monitoring such a long-lasting balloon throughout its lifetime has provided us with lots of valuable data that can help us replicate this success in the future.

#2 Global Traveller - While much of our fleet spends its time sweeping around the globe, we decided that one balloon should take its time discovering the Southern Hemisphere. So we packed its bags, gave it some sage travelling advice in the form of our automated control algorithms and sent it on its own little trip around the world - and what a trip it had! Launching from Brazil as part of our LTE test in June 2014, we maneuvered it over 23 separate countries across South America, Africa, Asia and Oceania before finally landing it with a full passport and a balloon full of memories.

#3 Sprint Star - The quickest a Loon balloon has travelled is 324 km/h while rushing to the South Pacific ocean over Antarctica - a similar speed to the world’s fastest animal, a fellow traveller of the skies, the Peregrine Falcon. Like any good sprinter though, this balloon needed to rest up, reducing its speed to a relatively sluggish 67 km/h while travelling over the south of Argentina, and it is this difference in speed that is really important to us. To provide coverage where and when it’s needed will require balloons to whiz over certain areas and linger for longer at others so that there is always a balloon overhead where needed. 

#4 The Frosty Survivor - It can get very, very cold up in the stratosphere. The coldest temperature one of our balloons had to endure was -83°C (-117°F) while travelling over the Chilean/Argentine border. The cold is a real challenge for our balloon manufacturing team. At such low temperatures the balloon envelope can become brittle and fragile. Selecting the right material and stress-testing it at extremely low temperatures in our labs has helped ensure that Loon balloons are durable enough to handle these temperatures for long periods of time.

#5 High-Flier - All Loon balloons fly roughly 20 kilometers above the earth’s surface, twice as high as commercial jets. This high-flier, however, reached our record altitude of 25.8 kilometers while travelling over the South Pacific ocean; nearly three times the height of Mount Everest. Altitude control is fundamental for maneuvering balloons, as different altitudes have different wind speeds and directions which our planning algorithms can predict and use to get our balloons to where they need to be. So, to our high-flier, we salute you for reaching higher than any Loon balloon has ever reached before! 
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Sunil Tripathi's profile photoFelis Ekog's profile photoRahul S's profile photojose juarez's profile photo
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Solo dale en donde dice traducir, el vinculo aparece debajo del encabezado.
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+Alan Eustace , come say hi to our Loon balloons next time you're up in the stratosphere!
 
About four years ago, one of our senior VPs, Alan Eustace, started kicking around a new idea: coming up with a way to explore the stratosphere similar to the way scuba divers explore the ocean. He pulled together a small team of scientists and engineers, and they got to work building and testing a system that could carry him high above the earth.

Early this morning, wearing the system he and the team developed -- a custom-made pressurized spacesuit, lifted via a helium-filled balloon -- Alan ascended to 136,000 feet before skydiving safely back down to earth, breaking the sound barrier on his way. He’s the first person to ever ascend to that altitude, and only the second to break the sound barrier outside of an airplane. Crazy, right! All in a day’s work when it comes to furthering scientific exploration...

Read more about the mission here: http://goo.gl/eK3xri
A helium-filled balloon lifted Alan Eustace, a Google executive, to more than 25 miles above the earth. Fifteen minutes after he cut himself loose, he was on the ground.
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5 Cool Things's profile photoดวงเด่น พันธ์ฆ้อง's profile photoWahid Ahmad's profile photoMichael Engineered's profile photo
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The concept seems great but I had a question while talking to my wife she pointed out the weather problems such as rains and thunderstorms etc. How have you evaluated google loon project verses the harsh climate conditions. If you would be able to provide coverage and the condition of the balloon in such conditions.
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Obrigado to our friends in Agua Fria, Brazil, for helping us with the latest Project Loon test! Our goal was to try to connect testers using LTE for the first time, and we successfully delivered the Internet to the school in time for their geography lesson.
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Tiao Machado's profile photoLiz ogden's profile photoMichael Engineered's profile photoMarina Bomura's profile photo
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How can I know where the balloons are? Sometimes I can see them at flightradar24.com, but this website has limited coverage.
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We recently got wind of a neat supercomputer visualization of global weather conditions. If you click on the “earth” label on the bottom left, and then modify the “height” parameter to 70 hPa, you’ll see what the winds look like at the altitudes where Loon flies. The polar vortex, which has been bringing record cold and snowfall to the US lately, looks especially fierce!
an animated map of global weather conditions
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Christina Pavalache's profile photoDavid Van Leeuwen's profile photoPaid2DreamFoundation- NEURS LLC.'s profile photoMichael Engineered's profile photo
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O projeto Loon vai tornar-se realidade e humanizar o acesso à internet. Parabéns à equipe do Google !
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In their circles
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Have them in circles
1,541,728 people
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Project Loon

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After a record-breaking 187 days aloft, we have recently landed the Project’s longest duration balloon in one of our Argentinian recovery zones.

That’s a long time! Enough time to hard-boil 33,660 eggs, or 134,640 if you like your yolk runny (doesn’t include eating time), or listen to Elton John’s “Rocket Man” just over 61,000 times. In the same time it took the Earth to complete half of its annual orbit of the sun, our record-breaker managed to circumnavigate the globe 9 times, enduring temperatures as low as -75c (-103 F) and wind speeds as high as 291 km/h, soaring to a maximum height of 21km and drifting over more than a dozen countries across 4 continents.

Having been in the air for just over 3 months we decided to put the balloon through its paces, making a series of altitude changes on its last circumnavigation to test our ability to fly north out of southern latitude bands. The test was successful and we managed to turn up to the Northern tip of Australia where we were able to access a much slower wind stream going in the opposite direction and sending our balloon lazily back over to South America. Finally, we brought it back into its original southern latitude band to swoop in and land in one of our Argentinian recovery zones for collection.

Recovery operations are now underway to bring the balloon back to the lab so the team can analyze this magnificent specimen and learn as much as possible about what makes such long durations possible, building these learnings into our future long-duration fleets before putting the record-breaker through our recycling process. We think that this balloon has definitely earned its retirement!
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Ready assist you in San Diego to continue this fantastic idea. Congratulations!
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3 million kilometers is a long journey. That distance would take you around the earth 75 times, or get you to the moon and back nearly 4 times over. It also happens to be the distance our Loon balloons have travelled through the stratosphere since the project began last year.

In that time we’ve learned a great deal about what it will take to bring the Internet to everyone, no matter where they are. For example, what footwear is it best for our manufacturing team to wear when they need to walk on the balloon envelopes? Turns out it’s very fluffy socks, the fluffier the better, to ensure the least amount of friction when building our balloons. This is just one of the hundreds of discoveries that has helped prevent leaks and refine our automated manufacturing process so that our balloons now last 10 times longer in the stratosphere than they did in 2013, with many lasting 100 days or more (our current record is 130 days!).

It’s one thing for our balloons to last longer, but to build a ring of connectivity around the world we’ll also need to get more in the air. Imagine how long it would take you and your friends to inflate 7,000 party balloons. That’s what it takes to fill just one of our Loon balloons for flight, so we’ve developed autofill equipment that will be capable of doing it in under 5 minutes. We now have the ability to launch up to 20 balloons per day as we continue to improve our ability to launch consistently at scale.

As we’ve launched more long-lasting balloons in the stratosphere we’ve needed to ensure that we can accurately maneuver them to where they need to go. By constantly computing thousands of trajectory simulations it turns out we can get pretty close to our targets.  For example, one flight came within 1.5km of our target destination over a flight of 9,000 kilometers, purely through predicting and sailing with the stratospheric winds. This is great for getting our balloons to where users need them, and great for getting balloons to our recovery zones at the end of their lifetime to make our recovery team’s job that much easier.

But perhaps one of the best illustrations of the progress we’ve made in our journey thus far are these pictures showing one of our uber-sophisticated launches from the earliest days of Project Loon compared to one of our more recent efforts. What a difference 3 million kilometers make; here’s to many more! 
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Damián Ramseyer's profile photoJon Walker's profile photoliviu cristian Stoicescu's profile photoMichael Engineered's profile photo
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One just landed in my Chief's garden(field) in Libode, South Africa. 31.5333° S, 29.0167° E
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No one has experienced the Loon team’s commitment to balloon recovery as intensely as team member Nick Kohli, who despite being pretty seasick once manned a small fishing vessel in the choppy swells off of New Zealand’s South Island two days in a row so he could quickly collect any balloons we decided to bring down right off the coast. Since then, our recovery efforts have come a long way. In this edition of the #askaway series, Nick explains a bit more about how balloon recovery works.

Balloon recovery is so important to Project Loon that we have an entire team dedicated to recovering balloons. Before we bring the balloons we forecast how long they’ll last and plan accordingly. As +Mike Trieu  correctly surmised on the Loon Plus page a few months ago, Loon balloons are equipped with a GPS device so our team can track the balloons, know where they land and go and pick them up. 

Making sure we recover our balloons is the right thing to do for the environment, but it’s also vital to the success of our project. Each balloon is its own scientific experiment designed to test various aspects of Loon technology so we can create the best possible system. Recovering the balloons allows us to analyze them in depth and learn as much as possible from each one, which then allows us to rapidly develop our stratospheric balloon technology. 
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What is the anatomy of the balloon?
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As winter begins in the Southern hemisphere, many Brazilians are sending paper balloons skyward in celebration of Festa Junina, a festival celebrating the winter solstice. Project Loon was honored to join in the festivities this year with our own balloon launch in the rural outskirts of Campo Maior, where we connected Linoca Gayoso, a local school, to the Internet for the first time.

The vast majority of this community doesn’t have Internet or cell service—but the locals know of a few very specific spots around town where they might find a weak signal. So if you see them sitting in trees, you’ll know why. (In fact, they have a word for this—‘vaga-lume,’ which means ‘fireflying,’ in English—because at night that’s what the glow from their mobile phones looks like.) But with the Project Loon team in town and one of our balloons overhead, the students in Tiao’s geography class were able to get to the Internet from their classroom for the first time as they learned about world cultures. 

This test flight marked a few significant ‘firsts’ for Project Loon as well. Launching near the equator taught us to overcome more dramatic temperature profiles, dripping humidity and scorpions. And we tested LTE technology for the first time; this could enable us to provide an Internet signal directly to mobile phones, opening up more options for bringing Internet access to more places.

Check out these photos for a behind-the-scenes look on how it all came together.
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It's a great project. 
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One of our balloons has had quite a journey over the past few weeks. It did a lap around the world in 22 days, and has just clocked the project’s 500,000th kilometer as it begins its second lap. It enjoyed a few loop-de-loops over the Pacific ocean before heading east on the winds toward Chile and Argentina, and then made its way back around near Australia and New Zealand. Along the way, it caught a ride on the Roaring Forties — strong west-to-east winds in the southern hemisphere that act like an autobahn in the sky, where our balloons can quickly zoom over oceans to get to where people actually need them.

Traversing the stratosphere is particularly challenging this time of year because the winds actually change direction as the southern hemisphere moves from warmer to colder weather, resulting in divergent wind paths that are hard to predict. Since last June, we’ve been using the wind data we’ve collected during flights to refine our prediction models and are now able to forecast balloon trajectories twice as far in advance. In addition, the pump that moves air in or out of the balloon has become three times more efficient, making it possible to change altitudes more rapidly to quickly catch winds going in different directions. There were times, for example, when this balloon could have been pulled into the polar vortex – large, powerful wind currents that whip around in a circle near the stratosphere in the polar region – but these improvements enabled us to maneuver around it and stay on course. We can spend hours and hours running computer simulations, but nothing teaches us as much as actually sending the balloons up into the stratosphere during all four seasons of the year.

Take a look through our photo album to see some of the specific improvements that have been made to the balloon technology, thanks to the lessons we’ve learned in flight.
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Interested in trying your hand at building your own high-altitude balloon? From April 18 - 21, Loon balloons may have some company in the stratosphere: The Global Space Balloon Challenge is an international project to encourage teams from all over the world to build and launch their own high altitude balloons in order to promote the spirit of hardware hacking and international STEM collaboration. Check out the details on their website -- and we hope to see you at 60,000 ft!
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Captain Jack's profile photoShig A Wire (eidyia)'s profile photoMonte Kottman's profile photomd halim's profile photo
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