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Polar Bear Painting
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Exterior Trim After
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Exterior Trim Before
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1.Determine the type of substrate/coating being repainted. Different substrates have different properties and determines which defects to look for when assessing the state of the existing coating (ex. Wood substrates are prone to sap bleeding whereas concrete substrates are prone to efflorescence). Additionally the type of substrate and existing coating will often determine the type of primer required (if any).
2.Determine the Types of Defects/Failures present. Identifying the types of defects present may help determine the source of the existing system’s failure (ex. Erosion is usually the result of natural weathering over time whereas flaking is commonly caused by poor adhesion between coats and thermal change stress). This step helps to narrow the focus regarding the root cause of defects and thus provides the framework for how to remedy the problem.
3.Determine Severity of Defects/Failures. This is one of the more difficult steps to identify as it takes into account the severity of each surface defect present on the existing coating. The importance of this step cannot be overlooked as this aspect of assessment has the greatest potential to influence the budget of the project. While Step 1 above determines the type primer required, and Step 2 provides the framework for how to remedy the problem, this step determines not only the type, but the amount of surface preparation and priming required. For example after a specifier determines that blistering, efflorescence and peeling is present on an exterior concrete wall coated with a latex system, the specifier must now evaluate the extent of these defects. Is the blistering slight or severe? Are pieces of paint peeling down to the surface or just the intermediate coat? The answers to these questions leads to the specifier’s decision of whether the surface requires a “touch-up”, spot priming or complete removal of the existing coating followed by a full coat of primer to ensure the substrate can be successfully repaint.
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This is a good example of where the choice of a coating system for a specific use would save a lot of time and unnecessary cost and labour.
New dimensional exterior wood stairs leading up to a wood deck. The coatings were applied to the ends, edges and backs, as well as the top treads. The peeling appeared shortly after application and exposure to a week of rain. There is inter-coat adhesion failure and substrate adhesion failure -- indicating that the primer's bond to the surface is marginal as is the top-coat's adhesion to the primer.
The primer is a water-based material originally designed for application to previously painted siding (vertical). The finish coating is an alkyd porch and deck coating applied in two coats. Moisture readings averaged 13% at the time of the inspection and there was no visible evidence of blistering due to moisture trapping under the film.
What is most noticable is the lack of penetration into the wood by the latex primer that likely could be attributed to the type of use for which it was intended. On new dimensional stair treads, a reduced coat of the alkyd porch enamel to improve penetration then two full coats applied would have served the purpose much better.
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Modern Greys in Promontory Town house.
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Modern Greys in Promontory Town house.
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After ceiling and walls.
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Before ceiling and walls.
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