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Piedmont Smiles: Vincent Marsh, DMD
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You’ve Got Questions About Canker Sores? We’ve Got Answers! - Canker sores are a common problem that tend to come with a lot of questions. What causes them? Are they contagious? Can you cure them? Can you avoid them? Is a canker sore and cold sore the same thing? At my Buckhead dental office, we understand canker sores can be confusing, and uncomfortable, so we’d like to give you some answers to commonly asked questions.

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5 Habits that Harm Teeth - Even if you brush and floss everyday, there are some common daily habits that put your teeth at increased risk for disease or damage. At my Buckhead dental office, we’re here to educate our patients on all the ways they can help keep their smiles in the best shape, so we’ve included a guide to the top five tooth-damaging habits we often see. Ice, Ice, Baby! A great way to cause tiny cracks, or sometimes even large ones, is to crunch on hard, cold ice cubes. Although it’s made of water and there are no threats of sugar damage, their solid texture is hard on teeth. Fractures in teeth make room for bacteria to settle in and cause decay. Lay Off The Snacks! Don’t worry, you don’t need to give up snacking completely. However, you should limit the number of times you snack throughout the day. The longer teeth are exposed to food and food particles, the more opportunity bacteria have to feed on sugars or starches. When bacteria feed, they produce acid. This acid may lead to decay

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Celebrate World Oral Health Day with Your Buckhead Dentist - Every year the World Dental Federation (FDI) sponsors World Oral Health Day to promote awareness on the effects a healthy mouth has on a healthy body. Everyone at my Buckhead dental office wants to do our part and share some of connections between your dental health and whole body health.

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Is Kissing Good for Your Oral Health? - Kissing can be beneficial for your oral health, and even your overall health. Endorphins are released when we kiss and and that is good for every single part of our bodies. It burns calories, exercises our facial muscles, and releases tension. Kissing can even boost your immune system. As far as your oral health goes, kissing can allow us to exchange healthy bacteria that are good for our mouths. It also leads to an increase in saliva flow, nature’s oral protectant. Saliva washes your mouth, rinses away food particles, and contains mineral ions that can repair your teeth! But kissing can also be hazardous. The Concerns The saliva that protects your teeth also acts as a superhighway for all kinds of bacteria and viruses, including the bacteria that lead to tooth decay and gum disease.  Because some saliva is usually exchanged during kissing, these bacteria travel back and forth from mouth to mouth setting up new colonies and releasing acids that eat away at your tooth enamel. The Pr

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Oral Health and Heart Health - As far as certain organs may seem from each other, our bodies work as one. This means that when there is a problem in our mouth, it can lead to more than just cavities or tooth loss. It can lead to all kinds of health problems. One of the most vital connections is between your gums and your heart. Your gums are like a portal to your bloodstream. An infection in your gums means that the infection quickly enters your bloodstream. When there is infection in your blood, your body reacts. The liver begins to produce certain proteins such as C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and these proteins lead to all kinds of problems including: inflamed arteries blood clots heart attacks strokes The fact is, gum disease will more than double your risk of a fatal heart attack or stroke. And that is why we emphasize regular checkups and cleanings so adamantly here at my Buckhead dental office. What Exactly is Gum disease? Gum or periodontal disease is an infection in your gums caused by a buildup of plaque on yo

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Can Eating Disorders Affect Your Teeth? - Eating disorders usually stem from any combination of emotional, psychological, or social factors and affect around 10 million Americans. Some whole-body health problems that arise from eating disorders range from muscle loss, decreased bone density, and increased risk for heart failure. At my Buckhead dental office, we also want to bring awareness to some of the oral health concerns associated with eating disorders. Dental Complications All eating disorders can negatively affect oral health. One of the main concerns is when the body doesn’t get all of the necessary nutrients it needs, your mouth suffers. Lips can become so dry they crack. Sores may appear in the mouth, and they tend to bleed pretty easily. Teeth may even begin to change color and shape, becoming more translucent. If vomiting is symptom, even more problems can arise. According to the National Eating Disorders Association, almost 90% of bulimics experience enamel erosion caused by overexposure to stomach acid.   Sig

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4 Reasons to Smile - At my Buckhead dental office, we love to see our patients smile. Not only because we are in the business of creating healthy, beautiful grins, but also because we know the health benefits behind showing those pearly whites. We’d like to share a few reasons you should smile more and smile often. Helps Immune System. Smiling helps produce more white blood cells which, in turn, fight off bacteria, germs, and disease. Makes Us Happy. Endorphins are the chemicals in our brains that help us feel happy. The effects of endorphins are often experienced while running, working out intensely, or just by smiling. Reduces Stress. Those powerful endorphins also help lower stress and anxiety. When we’re stressed, the level of the hormone cortisol is high, making us feel unpleasant. Endorphins lower the amount of cortisol in our bodies and fight off stress. Makes You Approachable. Smiling means the same thing in every language, so there are no cultural barriers to interpreting what a smile means.
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