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Physio Clinic Naas & Newbridge
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Inflammatory Diet Linked with Increased Colorectal Cancer Risk

Chronic inflammation has been linked with several chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, arthritis & diabetes.
Research published in the Journal of the American Medical Assocation suggests that inflammatory diet which is high in components such as red & processed meats, sugary drinks, and refined grains may be responsible for increasing people’s risk of developing colorectal cancer.
The researchers scored the inflammation levels of the diets of 120,000 male & female health professionals for 26 years. The researchers found that those that ate the most pro-inflammatory diet had a 32% greater risk of developing colorectal cancer

www.physioclinic.ie
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A Sudden Increase in Training Intensity Increases Injury Rates
As the evenings are becoming brighter people are turning their thoughts towards getting outdoors for exercise. It may even be time to get the running shoes on again. At this time of year, people tend to present with overload type injuries induced from a sudden increase in exercise intensity.
A recent study published in the British Joournal of Sports Medicine suggests that a sudden increase in training intensity is associated with a significant increased injury risk. This research showed that a very- high 2-week average acute:chronic workload ratio (≥1.54) was associated with the greatest risk of injury (28.6% injury risk). In other words, an increased in training intensity above the normal for that person is associated with a significant increased injury rate of almost 30%. This research was performed in professional athletes but it is possible that the average person may be at even greater risk of increasing injury risk due to a lack of muscular adaptation & conditioning. The takehome message is to increased the intensity gradually. Many an exercise plan has been cut short due to injury. Adequate planning is key to preventing this from happening.

Visit our website at: http://www.physioclinic.ie
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RESEARCH SHOWS BEER IS AN EFFECTIVE RECOVERY TOOL FOR MARATHON RUNNERS
New research from the Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise suggests that beer may act as a recovery tool for marathon runners. However, some may be dissappointed to note, that the beer is the non-alcoholic variety.
Marathon running & other ultra-endurance sports have been shown to suppress the immune system in athletes. This can increase their propensity to develop colds and flus. Tough training can also give rise to muscle damage and inflammation.
The athletes, most of whom were in their early 40’s, consumed a litre to a liter and a half of beer. They drank it daily for 3 weeks prior to the race and 2 weeks afterwards. The other group consumed a similarly flavoured placebo.
Interestingly “incidence of upper respiratory tract infections were 3.25 fold lower” in the nonalcoholic beer drinkers.
Blood analysis showed significantly less evidence of inflammation. The purported mechanism for the beneficial effects of non-alcoholic beer is not fully understood; however, such drinks are known to be rick in polyphenols. Polyphenols are phytochemicals which are compounds found in abundance in natural plant foods that have antioxidant properties. These compunds are also found in vegetables, greeen & black tea, red wine, coffee and chocolate. These compounds have a beneficial impact on the immune system

http://www.physioclinic.ie/naas-physiotreatments/
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Low Prevalence of Hip and Knee Arthritis in Active Marathon Runners.
A frequent comment from patients is that they avoid running as they are fearful that this will cause “wear & tear” of the knees or hips. A consequence of this ‘loading equals degeneration’ mindset is that there is a general perception that running will give rise to early arthritis. This would appear to be logical when one considers the “pounding’ of the joints induced from long distance running such as occurs during a marathon. The evidence on this topic; however, does not necessarily back up this theory.
Several studies have show that distance runners do not have a higher incidence of hip & knee arthritis than non-runners. A recent study by Ponzio et al. (2018) found that marathon runners had a lower incidence of hip and knee arthritis when compared with the general population. Arthritis prevalence was 8.8% for the marathon running group. This was significantly lower than the prevalence in the matched U.S. population, which was 17.9%.

Read more at: http://www.physioclinic.ie/hip-knee-arthritis/
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Why does it take two days for my muscle pain to come on after a workout?
The delay between exercising and experiencing muscle pain is a mystery to researchers. Attempts to find exact biomarkers that give rise to delayed onset muscle soreness have been largely unsuccessful. The exact cause of this delay in pain is unknown; however, most people will blame it on a “buildup of lactic acid”. The fact is; however, that lactic acid is largely removed within the first 2 hours after exercise and is almost completely ereadicated at 24 hours post exercise.
The source of pain in delayed onset muscle soreness is damage to the muscle fibres and protein components. However, just damaging tissue is difficult to correlate with pain because, as we all know, if you get a kick in the shin or break a bone, you will feel the pain straight away and it certainly won’t take two days to appear.
Researchers from the University of Oregan have suggested that histamine is released during aerobic exercise and that this may play a role in muscle pain. When given antihistamines they can decrease the perception of pain following exercise in athletes.
Japanese research suggests a new theory of muscle pain. The researchers demonstrated that neurotrophic factors, which are substances released to create nerve growth, may be a potential cause of such pain. Nerves must grow in order to stimulate muscle growth and therefore the growth of nerves may explain the pain arising after exercise.
This provides some insight into where the research is headed but at least we can rule out the ‘lactic acid’ theory. For more information on muscle injuries visit: www.physioclinic.ie
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New research shows that exercise alone does not lead to weight loss in women.

Research just carried out at Bangor University may provide some answers as to why some people struggle to lose weight despite their best efforts at exercising.
Dr Hans-Peter Kubis of Bangor University states “our study showed that using exercise training alone for weight loss is not effective in females, whether lean or obese. The researchers found that women who engaged in exercise classes three times per week for 4 or 8 weeks but did no change their diet failed to lose any weight.


Part of the reasoning behind this is that those who exercise experience an increase in appetite and, whether consciously or unconsciously, will increase their food intake. The researchers found that overweight individuals showed changes in blood hormone markers that were drivers of increased hunger. This was not present in leaner individuals. The team says that this may partly explain why exercise alone may not lead to weight loss.

http://www.physioclinic.ie/weight-loss/
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Ditch the Glucosamine pills. Start exercising for healthier joints

Evidence for Glucosamine in Treating Knee Arthritis

A study published in 2015 in the Journal of Arthritis & Rheumatology, does not find any difference between the effects of glucosamine and placebo when taken for knee pain over a four year period. This conclusion was a result of an extensive study carried out on over 1600 people with knee pain. According to the researchers glucosamine and chondroitin did not relieve pain and regenerate the joint cartilage as claimed by their manufacturers.

In fact, another trial carried out earlier in 2010 had come up with similar findings.  The effects of glucosamine were studied on over 600 individuals with knee osteoarthritis. The results showed that though the supplements relieved pain slightly at the onset, they were no more effective than a placebo in the long term. The study was published in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases. Analysis of more than a dozen randomised controlled trials that were conducted between 1994 and 2014 was also inconclusive. None of the studies could prove the benefits of glucosamine on different elements of osteoarthritis such as pain, swelling, cartilage health and mobility issues. The U.S. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence does not include this drug in its guidelines for knee arthritis treatment due to insufficient evidence.

Experts caution against spending money on such yet-to-be proven products. Even the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) does not recommend glucosamine for patients with osteoarthritis as the effects remain questionable. Clinicians are urging individuals with osteoarthritis of the knee, to opt for a healthier and effective alternative such as exercise. Healthy joints can only be achieved through regular exercise. And as a physiotherapist myself, I cannot agree enough.

Is Exercise harmful for Joint Pain?

A low intensity exercise regime is extremely joint friendly. It exerts a healthy stress on the joints. There is a cyclic loading-unloading of cartilage in the weight bearing joints like hip, knee and foot as we exercise.  This increases their blood supply. The pain producing chemicals are washed away and replaced by oxygen and nutrients that help in cartilage regeneration. This reduces pain and promotes cartilage health. Furthermore, exercise strengthens the muscles around the joints. Stronger muscles offset the loads passing through the joint, thus minimising pain.  In addition, exercise maintains flexibility of the joint capsules, ligaments, tendons and muscles around the joint. This prevents joint stiffness.

To read more click on: http://www.physioclinic.ie/glucosamine/
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Moderate Alcohol Intake Leads to Increased Longevity

Dietary research appears to be constantly conflicting in its findings. Advice on alcohol consumption is a classic case of where confusion reigns amidst a myriad of conflicting media headlines. However, if you delve a little deeper then the topic is not as conflicting as it might appear. Research tends to demonstrate a consistent link between alcohol consumption & cancer, especially breast cancer. However, when it comes to heart disease & stroke, the research demonstrates a consistent decrease in disease rates in those that consume a moderate amount of alcohol. The crux of the debate on alcohol intake and health is whether the beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system outweigh the negative impact regarding cancer risk.

A recent large-scale study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology suggests that consuming alcohol in moderation could help older individuals to live longer. Moderate alcohol consumption equates to no more than 14 units per week – roughly six glasses of wine or six pints of beer. The research demonstrates a consistent 25 to 40 percent reduction in risk of heart attacks or strokes in those that consume a moderate amount of alcohol. This makes sense scientifically as moderate alcohol raises good cholesterol (HDL) and improves insulin sensitivity. Once you consume more than this amount, any positive effects are quickly eradicated.

The researchers from this study argue the potential "protective" benefits of moderate drinking "clearly outweigh" the possible cancer risk, particularly within the elderly. Furthermore, research from the Nurses Health Study suggests that amongst women who consumed one alcoholic drink a day or more, those who had the highest level of folate in the blood were 90% less likely to develop breast cancer than those who had the lowest level of the B vitamin. This suggests that adequate folate intake may negate the negative effect of moderate alcohol consumption on cancer risk. Also, previous research suggested that getting 600 micrograms a day of folate could counteract the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk.

If you understand the research you can make an informed choice regarding your lifestyle choices

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Evidence for Chiropractic Treatment of Low Back Pain

Back pain is the most common complaint treated by chiropractors. A recent scientific review suggests that chiropractic care may be as effective as pain-killing medications without the side effects associated with medications.


Researchers performed a review of the current research to analyse the effectiveness of and any potential harm associated with spinal adjustments, compared with other non-manipulative therapies for adults with acute low back pain.

The Cochrane review found that manipulation for low back pain provided similar relief to anti-inflammatory drugs; however, chiropractic care has none of the risks associated with medication. Recent research suggests a link between over the counter painkillers and heart attacks, while there is widespread concern about deaths from the use of opioid drugs.

Chiropractic Treatments Show Improvement in Pain & Function

Of 26 randomised clinical trials (RCT’s), 15 RCTs (1,711 patients) showed that spinal manipulation has a statistically significant association with improvements in pain. Twelve randomized controlled trials (1,381 patients) showed that spinal manipulation has a statistically significant association with improvements in function. No RCT reported any serious adverse event.

To read more on chiropractic treatment of low back pain go to: http://www.physioclinic.ie/chiropractor-naas/
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Exercise Shown to Improve Symptoms of Chronic Fatigue
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome affects about seven in 1000 people. Exercise has been shown to reduce tiredness in individuals suffering from the condition. Research published in the Lancet Journal analysed the impact of 12 weeks of a physiotherapy guided exercise programme in individuals suffering from chronic fatigue.
The outcome was compared with a group receiving a medical programme which included medication for depression, pain and insomnia.
The exercise programme demonstrated superior results with one in five of the exercise group repoting feeling ‘much better’
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