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Philip Durbin
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*For most of our history, the public domain was just over the horizon.*

"This is the ways things always were—until quite recently. For most of our history, the public domain was just over the horizon. From 1790 until 1978, the average copyright term was never more than thirty-two years, meaning that most culture just a generation and a half old was free for anyone to build upon without the permission of anyone else."

From "Free Culture" by Lawrence Lessig, pages 24-25 http://www.free-culture.cc/freeculture.pdf http://www.free-culture.cc

See also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPbe4UUQL38 but the audio isn't so great.

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I just finished The Circle by Dave Eggers. Parts of it are good but a quick search for "overwrought" reveals a review that sums up my general feelings: https://newrepublic.com/article/115062/dave-eggers-circle-reviewed
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IBM on young girls programming in 1968

"a 1968 major ad from IBM for their new programming language. Very clear what they thought programmers look like" -- https://twitter.com/pwnallthethings/status/733851975389962241

Here's the text from the ad:

===

Susie Meyer meets PL/I

The story of how a single language answers the question, "Can a young girl with no previous programming experience find happiness handling both commercial and scientific applications, without resorting to an assembler language?" Let's face it. The cost of programming just keeps going up. So for some time to come, how well you in your job depends on how programmers like Susie Meyer do theirs.

That's the reason for PL/I, the high-level language for both scientific and commercial applications.

With PL/I, programmers don't have to learn other high-level languages. They can concentrate more on the job, less on the language.

So think about PL/I. Not just in terms of training, but in terms of the total impact it can have on your operation.

===

See also and http://thecomputerboys.com/?p=189 "Making Programming Masculine" at http://www.sas.upenn.edu/~nathanen/files/cbi-gender.pdf which mentions 1968.
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Reminds me of Louis CK:

She asks me, 'Daddy, does the Earth go around the sun?' And I go, 'Yeah.' She goes, 'Does it do it all the time?' 'Yeah.' She says, 'Will the Earth always go around the sun forever?' I was like, 'No, at some point the sun is going to explode.' She's 7 years old! Do you understand how horrible that is?

"She started crying immediately, crying bitter tears for the death of all humanity. And here's how I tried to save it. 'Oh, honey, this isn't going to happen until you and everybody you know has been dead for a very long time.' She didn't know any of those things, and now she knows all of those things. She's going to die, everybody she knows is going to die, they're going to be dead for a very long time, and then the sun is going to explode. She learned all that in 12 seconds at the age of 7. But she took it pretty well. I was proud of her.
Warning: Nerd Sniping Ahead

This is an absurdly interesting Wikipedia article: a timeline of various events in geology, biology, physics, and culture which we can expect at various points from ten thousand years in the future on forward. Almost each line of this table has a giant story behind it which could be the seed for an hour of discussion or more.

I blame +Craig Sosin for this, and for the fact that I will have to consciously avoid reading this if I want to get work done today.

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"Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World" by Cal Newport sounds like a great book: http://calnewport.com/books/deep-work/

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Going forward, when people tell me they want to be an engineer, TL, or manager, I plan to share these cautionary lists with them so they can be more well prepared.
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