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Phil Hill
Works at MindWires Consulting
Attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Lived in Las Vegas, NV
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Phil Hill

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New post on e-Literate

Given his profile on LinkedIn, Mr. Hitchcock appears to be new to education except for whatever memories he has of his own days as a student. Let me offer a couple of suggestions on how to get along in education for him and the many vendor employees who are in a similar situation:

1. Never, ever, say that you want your company to be the Uber of education, the Airbnb of education, the Pokemon GO of education, or the [insert name of tech darling] of education unless you really enjoy being a recluse (or you are secretly a double agent for your employer’s direct competitor).
2. If you absolutely must say something like the above, then do not say you are the Netflix of education. Honestly, Netflix isn’t even great at being the Netflix of movies. The last time they recommended a movie that I actually wanted to watch was…uh…never.

http://mfeldstein.com/pearsonalized-learning/
I have been pretty relentless in mocking Knewton CEO Jose Ferriera for his "robot tutor in the sky" description of the company's adaptive learning product. And I pledge to continue this proud traditi
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Phil Hill

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We're #1! We're #1!

CB Insights ranks Googles top 24 product flops, and we at Google+ earned the #1 spot. Excellent.

Google’s high-profile social network started off strong in June 2011, with a built-in advantage of visibility among most Gmail users. But the social network never managed to siphon activity away from Facebook. By 2014, Google+ underwent a series of leadership changes, followed by a massive redesign of the service. However, these moves failed to substantially enlarge the user base. Though Google+ is still in operation with an audience of about 111 million active users (compared to Facebook’s reported 1.7 billion monthly users), it’s hardly the first name that comes to mind when mentioning “top” social networks.

https://www.cbinsights.com/blog/google-product-flops/
You don't get to be an internet giant like Google without betting on a few failures along the way.
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Google+ is dead! Long live Google+! :-)
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Phil Hill

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Wow - Pearson's CTO / COO just got a two-fer of dumb this month:

Pearson aims to become the 'Netflix of education'

which links to:

Machine learning platforms could make data scientist roles redundant, says Pearson CIO

http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2471013/pearson-aims-to-become-the-netflix-of-education

If you read the first article, the technology approach is fine, but the tin ear and the implications of this way of thinking are the problem. Jeez.
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😂
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Good article in Chronicle today (link with 24-hour access) on Universal Design as approach to disability access. I believe that +George Station and others have shared and described similar concepts.

https://shar.es/1xrqBx

"My ultimate goal is that fewer and fewer students need to come to us — that courses are open and accessible from the get-go," says Candida Darling, director of the college’s disability-resource center.

Universal design becomes controversial in the realm of graded assignments and testing. "Universal design for learning," a framework developed at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is the most commonly used application of the concept at all education levels. It calls for a curriculum that lets students use "multiple means" to express what they know._
The philosophy aims to make physical spaces, products, and even learning itself accessible to all. What does that mean on campuses?
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I sent my blind son a copy for his take. My belated return to higher ed coincided with helping him, newly blinded, navigate higher ed on a not particularly compliant campus, filling gaps in late 80's disabilities services. 
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Not sure whether to file this here or under Humor . . .

eCampusNews puts out an article on the "7 best university CIO blogs". OK, I'll bite.

#6 is from U Illinois, which has a total of 8 blog posts in 2016, NONE of them by the CIO, and 7 of the 8 are reprints from articles where the CIO was author or co-author. The description at eCampusNews:

The University of Illinois is starting in the right direction, despite being new to the Higher Ed CIO blogosphere. Instead of focusing on marketing specific IT projects, UI’s CIO, Michael Hites, provides insight into topics that are important to Higher Ed. At approximately two posts a month, Hites is already outpacing most University CIO blogs, and the addition of guest posts from faculty helps add differing perspectives that keep the content fresh. If what they’ve already posted is any indication of what’s to come, then their CIO blog is definitely worth bookmarking.

So this is one of the more prolific, fresh blogs from CIO? And this is worth a clickbait article?

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/best-cio-blogs/2/


Some of the best CIO blogs that provide insider perspectives on IT projects and management in higher education.
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humor, definitely. 
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Most of the time, ed-tech tools and services are rooted in innovations in teaching practices that were conceived, tested and refined by educators. But in the process of promoting technology, the pedagogy often gets lost. What we are left with is some product for sale attached to some (usually inflated) claim of benefit without the connective tissue of the teaching idea that makes it all work.
Rather than shun technologies hyped by companies with grand promises, faculty members should force vendors to explain how the tools will help professors teach and students learn, Michael Feldstein argues.
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24-hour access w link:
Why Ed-Tech Software Patents Could Harm Innovation https://shar.es/1xlvKE

Reading a patent is not only legally risky but also very hard. Any patent trial includes a "construction phase" devoted to interpreting the claims. Until that process has been completed, the scope of the patent is legally indeterminate. Patent owners naturally use this ambiguity in their public-relations efforts to calm the sorts of concerns that are being raised regarding Elsevier’s patent. When accused of attempting to patent the learning-management system (LMS) itself, Blackboard’s public response was that it would never do any such thing, and that the company was attempting only to protect one modest but important innovation that it had contributed to the market.

At the end of the construction phase of that trial, their patent was determined to cover the following:

Any system in which a user can log in with the role of teacher in one course and the role of student in another.
The arcane details, as it turns out, pose a serious risk to colleges, in complex ways.
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Weaponized patents: eeeeeeek!
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Olivia On Crocs from my daughter's school newspaper article:

When Crocs made their debut in 2002, they sparked fierce backlash from fashion-lovers and Internet trolls alike, yet more than 300 million pairs of rubber clogs have been sold in over 90 countries according to HuffingtonPost. Disapproval of Crocs has decreased significantly since the downfall of Memebase and the anticipated undoing of Facebook by post-happy dads; by my projections, complete acceptance of Crocs as footwear instead of scrap rubber will arrive by 2022. I call upon you, America, to denormalize hot people wearing Crocs. For a comprehensive list of those who can still enjoy the tendonitis-inducing shoes, please see below.
Toddlers on the beach: It’s baby’s first seaside outing! If your kid is under the age of three, Crocs are an acceptable choice of footwear. They’re easy to put on, the Jibbitz were made to capture the attention of small children, and a toddler doesn’t really need good arch support. And if you lose these in the waves, no one will care (except environmental advocates, but the Great Pacific garbage patch is probably exaggerated).
An old woman gardening: Look, we’re just happy Grandma Doris can still find things to live for after Grandpa Fred kicked it. I guess for her that’s over-watering a couple of herbs and tulips. The laces of conventional sneakers aren’t an option anymore with her arthritis, and velcro is too flashy; sandals won’t work either because she’d have to put on sheer pantyhose to ineffectively hide her varicose veins, so she’s landed on Crocs.
Dog owners: Never has a shoe been so deserving to be pressed in dog poop. Don’t even look where you’re stepping. Get those Crocs nice and dirty as you walk around your backyard or pull your dog off of another at the dog park. In a study put out by scientists, 93 percent of people cannot tell the difference between a brand new pair of Crocs and ones covered in dog poop. Oh, no! Does your actual foot have poop on it? You deserve it for buying shoes with holes in them.
People who no longer desire the touch of a woman: Maybe you were dating someone at one point and things fizzled or maybe you’re “waiting for marriage” (or for the attention of that girl Jennifer in your Spanish class, whichever comes first), but let’s be honest: the ineffable curiosity that once made you excited to bag babes peters out eventually. So go ahead, get on Zappos, and symbolically remove yourself from the dating pool. It’s not like anyone wanted you there anyway.
Mario Batali: So you’re going to tell the King of Italian Cuisine that Crocs aren’t in style? It’s Mario Batali, get off your high horse.
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Phil Hill

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Interesting article. Most of my interview hit the cutting room floor, but I was pointing out that using data to figure out curriculum mapping and impact of early courses on later courses is not new, it’s just that the process has mostly been done by internal staff with spreadsheets. Also raised the issue that this gets into academic governance issues - departmental design of curriculum - if this is used to change curriculum. Best usage would be for advising-level interventions.

Now that I read the article, it sounds more like the intervention is changing the curriculum requirements. Slippery slope.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/09/23/students-who-earn-cs-gateway-courses-are-less-likely-graduate-new-data-show
Data show that students who earn C’s in foundational courses are much less likely graduate. As a result, U of Arizona may require some C students to repeat a course.
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I wouldn't mind a richer convo based on what was clearly "releasable" +Phil Hill opinion but did not happen to make it into the interview. Seconding +Vanessa Vaile vote :-)
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Scenes from the growing SV dystopia from NYT

Silicon Valley technologists love to explain how they have disrupted the minutiae of daily life, from our commutes to the ways we share family photos. But along the way, they have also managed to disrupt their local restaurant industry.

That may not be an issue for tech workers with access to free, farm-fresh cuisine in corporate cafeterias, but for everyone else here it is leaving a void between the takeout cuisine popping up around Palo Alto — picture bento boxes ordered on iPads at a counter — and $500 meals at high-end restaurants.
Restaurants in Palo Alto are increasingly struggling as rents soar and workers are hired away by the corporate cafeterias of behemoths like Google.
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Phil's Collections
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Tagline
I find educational technology news and try to make sense of it.
Introduction
Educational technology consultant, market analyst, family man
Education
  • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    Electrical Engineering, 1984 - 1989
  • Langley High School
    1982 - 1984
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Work
Occupation
Educational technology consultant, analyst, speaker and writer
Employment
  • MindWires Consulting
    Founder, partner, 2012 - present
  • Delta Initiative
    Executive VP, 2008 - 2012
  • HBO Systems
    Founder, 2000 - 2008
  • Datacube
    VP Engineering, 1996 - 2000
  • Perot Systems
    Consultant, 1998 - 1999
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
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Las Vegas, NV - Salt Lake City, UT - Atlanta, GA - Chapel Hill, NC - Peachtree City, GA - McLean, VA - Troy, NY - Albuquerque, NM - Satellite Beach, FL - Newburyport, MA - Raleigh, NC - Los Gatos, CA
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