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Pheng Heong Tan
Attends National University of Singapore
Lives in Singapore
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Pheng Heong Tan

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They say that to dream is the privilege of the young.I think this is a beautiful saying, but it could not be more wrong.It’s not that there is anything wrong with having dreams when you are young, but I have always felt that within this expression lies the nuance that once you get out into the “real” world you no longer have time to dream.I’d like to suggest to you that a dream that is swept away and forgotten amidst the challenges of adult life ...
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Our browsers can produce these visuals. Isn't it truly exciting?
 
The Style of Elements
Posted by +Daniel Smilkov, Software Engineer

Data doesn't have to be big to be complex. In 1869, Mendeleev created the first "periodic table"--an arrangement of elements based on fewer than 70 data points. In fact, the most interesting thing about the original periodic table might have been the data it didn't include: the "holes" in the original chart turned out to be a kind of treasure map, pointing the way to undiscovered elements.

Although the periodic table is one of the classic visualizations, it still provides a chance for designers to play with new ideas. The Big Picture visualization group (http://goo.gl/vxsUdU) was fascinated with this version (http://goo.gl/8ozrj8), which allocates elements bigger or smaller areas to give a qualitative picture of how common they are in the Earth's crust.

Because the numbers behind that chart were only approximate, we decided to design a precise, quantitative view. (We're going to get into the weeds on this--visualizers gonna visualize--but you can skip to the last paragraph if you don't want to read the details of the design.) We quickly discovered that using area to represent abundances didn't give a good sense of the differences between elements: they covered so many orders of magnitude that all but the most common elements disappeared entirely. (The earth's crust has 170,000 times as much oxygen as uranium.) Using a logarithmic scale had the opposite effect: it flattened out the scale so that differences didn't seem as significant.

But we found that using volume to represent size produced a readable and interesting result. It also felt natural and direct when we looked at other data related to the elements. After all, how better to show the volume of 1 gram of an element than by volume itself?

Those experiments led to the visualization you see at http://goo.gl/5RCSmj. For fun, we let you choose between representing data with length or with volume, so you can see for yourself the difference the encoding makes. And as a bonus, we've added a view of electron shells, so you can see how Mendeleev’s visualization beautifully reflects atomic structure.
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"High-caliber athletes enjoy natural synchronization between mind and body, combined with an ability to play as part of a unit. Focusing too much on mistakes can disrupt the functioning of that well-oiled machine. Redirect negativity with positivity toward external targets: your teammates."
Pride left unchecked can corrode team chemistry. Follow this advice when negativity begins to creep into your team’s culture.
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Beautiful article.

"I took a bike ride early in the morning and a mile into the ride I realized that I had no idea how I got to be where I was. I mean I knew I was traveling on a bike but the roads, the cars, the people, absolutely no memory. So what happened? I went on autopilot. I missed the birds chirping, the breeze in my face, the pristine blue skies. I had missed it and I would never get those moments back. But I did realize it in time. It was actually a gift to my day because from that moment I became mindful and started to notice all the details around me."
How often have you arrived at a destination and stopped to realize that you don't remember the roads you took or the stop signs you stopped at? This can be a frightening realization. The same happens in our day-to-day moments....
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Good-to-know.
The tips, tools and tipples that all men of style should master, courtesy of Mr Alfred Tong, author of The Gentleman's Guide to Cocktails
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A relatable and timely reminder. :)
Self-pity can block success and a swelled head can derail it. People skills humility can prevent both & fuel success. Here's 10 ways to stay humble.
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Pheng Heong Tan

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'In a POSSE world, I publish a short status on my Web site before it’s sent to Twitter with a short link back to my original content; I add a photo to my gallery before it’s pushed on Flickr, 500px or Facebook, one more time with a link back to the original content, my content.

I’ve already heard that I was breaking a moral contract'

#perspective   #publishing   
Is coding a blogging tool still worth the effort in 2013? I’ve been asking myself the question almost every time I’ve pushed some code on Publify fo...
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This is my first attempt at sharing my experiences with living through and coping with childhood trauma. I want to spend some time exploring these experiences with my readers, but I also want to spend some time addressing important issues regarding public attitudes towards people like me.
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I think for entrepreneurs, bloggers, or any user, for that matter, technology should be warm
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"Speaking the truth sounds like a simple step, but I believe it has a profound effect on your life. Day to day, it makes conversations more relaxing. You have no choice but to speak honestly, so you become increasingly happy to do so.

And the reality of doing this is that it changes you internally as well. It’s tough to put into words except to say that you feel more pure. You start to like yourself more. You are effectively telling yourself that your actions are motivated by good values. Therefore, you can always speak to them, and explain them, with honesty. In many ways it is an act of self-love, and it becomes a moral barometer that affects other actions, too. Subconsciously, it holds you to your values."
Two years ago I took a vow never to tell a lie. Here is what happened.
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Excerpts from the article "7 Things That Separate Average People From Amazing Performers":

1. Set goals worth fighting for:
“It’s better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb rather than halfway up one you don’t.”

5. Put others first:
"Think of envisioning the future — specifically how we’d like people to react to us — and then figuring out how to get there."

6. Treat people with respect, and expect them to reciprocate.
"Lest you be concerned that the last bit of advice can be a bit Machiavellian, it’s simultaneously important to treat others with respect... At the same time, don’t forget the other side of the coin. It’s hard to treat people with true respect — rather than being obsequious or disingenuous — if you don’t respect yourself first."
 
"It’s surprising how many people don’t think hard about whether they’re chasing a goal that is worthy of their efforts. They wind up following someone else’s dream — a career that others have picked for them or life choices that someone else has made on their behalf. They find it hard to succeed, and they’re unsatisfied even when they have achieved the goal, but they can’t figure out why.

As a wise person once said, “It’s better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb rather than halfway up one you don’t.”"
Philo Nordlund/flickrThere's a radio show whose host has a decades-long, running joke about a town in which all the children are above average. Work l
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Have him in circles
34 people
Emmanuel GARELLI's profile photo
張人尹's profile photo
Yong Yao Toh's profile photo
Eric Yang's profile photo
孙晓飞's profile photo
kuanhua su's profile photo
Benedict Liang's profile photo
賴君濠's profile photo
Chee Wee Teo's profile photo
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Gender
Male
Education
  • National University of Singapore
    Computer Science, 2011 - present
  • National Taiwan University
    Information Engineering, 2013 - 2014
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Singapore
Previously
Taipei
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