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Peter Suber
Works at Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication
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Want to improve access to research on glyphosate? Try harder than the Glyphosate Task Force.

To improve access to research on glyphosate, the Glyphosate Task Force (GTF) gathered print copies of 71 research reports. Each report is owned by a member of the GTF and could presumably have been digitized, if not made #openaccess. The GTF put the print copies in a room in Brussels, requires registration to use the room, and plans to close the room at the end of October.

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Peter Suber

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Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication is hiring a project coordinator.

Please spread the word and help us find an extraordinary person.

https://sjobs.brassring.com/tgwebhost/jobdetails.aspx?jobId=1228483&PartnerId=25240&SiteId=5341

#oa #openaccess #harvard
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Harvard is hiring a software engineer for its institutional repository.

Please spread the word and help us find some excellent people.

Primary responsibilities:

* Provide technical support and for the systems and services used by the Office for Scholarly Communications as well as services provided to scholars to support open access policies and system infrastructure.

* Administer and enhance the Harvard open access digital repository.

* Develop and enhance software and websites.

* Evaluate both existing and emerging repository software for future development. Take ownership of new open access (OA) projects....

Note: This is not the same position we advertised in June 2016. The two developers will work together.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/ZmTn9X2VNRP

#oa #openaccess 
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Harvard Library publishes report on converting subscription journals to open access.

The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) is pleased to announce the release of a comprehensive literature review on strategies for converting subscription journals to open access.

In the spring of 2015, the OSC commissioned the research from David Solomon, Mikael Laakso, and Bo-Christer Björk, who completed it in the spring of 2016. We posted a preliminary draft online for a four month public-comment period, and asked a distinguished panel of 20 colleagues to add their own comments.

The authors identified 15 journal-flipping scenarios: 10 that depend on article processing charges (APCs) and 5 that dispense with APCs. For each one they give examples, evidence, and their assessment of its strengths and weaknesses. The examples come from all scholarly niches by academic field, regions of the world, and economic strata.

This comprehensive review of diverse approaches is the report’s strength. Not every flip was a success, and not all the flips that were successful using one scenario would have been successful with a different scenario. But there were successes under every scenario and in every scholarly niche. Journals that picked a scenario that fit their circumstances were able preserve or enhance their readership, submissions, quality, and financial sustainability.

The invited panelists represent a wide range of relevant experience and expertise, including OA and non-OA academic publishing, fee-based and no-fee OA publishing, for-profit and non-profit OA publishing, society and non-society OA publishing, the global north and global south, the sciences and humanities.

The overall questions were: What has already been done? What conversion methods have been tried or proposed? What has been the outcome for submissions, readership, quality, impact, and finances? Which conversion scenarios have good track records, and in which scholarly niches? When journal publishers consider a move to OA, what options and evidence should they take into account?

The research was made possible by a grant to the Harvard Library from the Arcadia Fund. We thank both the Arcadia Fund and the Harvard Library for supporting this research.

Text of the report
https://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/27803834

Journal-flipping project home page
https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/journal-flipping

View this announcement online
https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/programs/journal-flipping/report-released

#oa #openaccess 
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Also see our new report on digitizing orphan works for open access.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/ABgFCAUDR5s

I hope you didn't mistake today's orphan-works announcement for a repeat of the journal-flipping announcement!
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Welcome to the new fellows at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.

https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/newsroom/2016_2017_community
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More on open data to crack Zika.

From Donald NcNeil in +The New York Times:

"[David] O’Connor and his colleagues have been infecting pregnant female macaques with the Zika virus, minutely recording their symptoms, and giving them blood tests and ultrasounds. But then, instead of saving their data for academic journals, the researchers have posted it almost immediately on a website anyone can visit. The openness of the process thrills scientists, who say it fosters collaboration and speeds research....Back-to-back epidemics of Ebola and Zika have driven some infectious disease specialists to embrace greater speed and openness. Until now, they felt forced to hoard data and tissue samples: Careers depend on being published in prestigious journals, which often refuse to publish work that has previously been released and may take months to edit papers....Dr. O’Connor’s decision was the most radical manifestation of a trend already underway. In early February, more than 30 of the most prominent academic journals, research institutions and research funders signed a “Statement on Data Sharing in Public Health Emergencies” in which the journals agreed to make all articles about the Zika virus available free instead of charging their subscription fees, which can be hundreds of dollars. The journals also agreed to consider articles that had first been posted for comment on public forums like bioRxiv, which is hosted by the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory on Long Island. The funders agreed to make everyone receiving their money share data as widely as possible...."

#oa #openaccess #opendata #zika

A primate lab’s free sharing of information, contrary to the norm of saving data for publication, may lead to a model for responding to epidemics.
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Peter Suber

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Harvard Open Access Project is hiring a half-time research assistant.

Please spread the word!

https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/getinvolved/internships/hoap

HOAP is a project within the +The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.

#oa #openaccess


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Open-access mandate for equipment manuals.

This is a great idea: OA for manuals plus the right to purchase the same parts as licensed dealers.

"A group of independent repair shops, mechanics and do-it-yourselfers who fix and resell used electronics, appliances, medical and farming equipment want to change that. They want to do so by requiring manufacturers to open access to the manuals, parts, tools, diagnostic equipment and permanent software that is almost exclusively available to their own employees and authorized dealers. The Repair Association has lobbied for “right to repair” bills in five states — Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nebraska, New York and South Dakota. None have passed.The bills are modeled on a 2013 Massachusetts law that requires automakers to give the same information and parts to independent auto repair shops as to their licensed dealers. In 2014, automakers agreed to apply the law’s provisions across the country...."

#oa #openaccess #right_to_repair #right_to_tinker
Supporters of “right to repair” laws want electronics manufacturers to give access to manuals, parts and tools needed by independent repair shops to fix their products.
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ExxonMobil has an #openaccess repository of documents showing the company's "history and commitment to open research into climate science."
http://corporate.exxonmobil.com/en/current-issues/climate-policy/climate-perspectives/supporting-materials

It's not big: just 22 documents so far, mostly from the 70's and 80's.

Apparently the company shared the docs in order to answer charges that it suppressed its own early discoveries about the connection between carbon emissions and climate change. "In the interest of transparency, soon after the [charges] appeared, ExxonMobil established on online repository of these documents so that readers could more easily access and examine them in their entirety."
http://corporate.exxonmobil.com/en/current-issues/climate-policy/climate-perspectives/understanding-the-exxonknew-controversy

While the docs are open now, I don't believe they were open at the time. Hence, while it's good to be able to read them now, I'm not sure how they answer the criticism that the company kept them from the public at the time.

The company also points to 50 peer-reviewed articles that its scientists published on climate science from 1983 to the present. I haven't checked, but it seems that all or most of them are paywalled. (Publishing in a paywalled journal is not open, but neither is it suppression in the sense intended by the critics.)
http://cdn.exxonmobil.com/~/media/global/files/energy-and-environment/climate_peer_reviewed_publications_1980s_forward.pdf

I have no opinion on the charges against Exxon, or on whether the open docs fairly represent what the company knew about climate change in the 70's and 80's. (What do climate scientists have to say about that?) But I definitely support #openaccess as a key part of any response to this kind of criticism. More sunshine!

#oa #openaccess #climate
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Orphan Works to Open Access: Harvard Library publishes report on digitizing orphan collections.

The Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) is pleased to announce the release of a comprehensive literature review on strategies for digitizing orphan works for open access.

An orphan work is any original work of authorship for which a good faith, prospective user cannot readily identify and/or locate the copyright owner - especially in situations, like digitization projects, where permission from the copyright owner is legally necessary. Orphan works can be books, photographs, movies, music, or any other copyrighted media.

The Orphan Works Project is an attempt to solve the legal complexities of the orphan works problem by identifying no-risk or low-risk ways to digitize and distribute orphan works under U.S. copyright law. The project’s goal is to help clear the way for U.S. universities, libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural institutions to digitize their orphan works and make the digital copies open access .

In the spring of 2015, the OSC commissioned research from David Hansen, Clinical Assistant Professor and Faculty Research Librarian at University of North Carolina School of Law. David is no stranger to the orphan works problem; he was one of primary facilitators for a project to create the Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use of Collections Containing Orphan Works for Libraries, Archives, and Other Memory Institutions, released in December 2014.

David completed the report, titled Digitizing Orphan Works: Legal Strategies to Reduce Risks for Open Access to Copyrighted Orphan Works, in the spring of 2016. A panel of experts then read the draft and commented on its significance, as well as its strengths and weaknesses in methodology and presentation. These expert comments ultimately helped improve the final edition.

Based in part on this report, Harvard Library is launching an initiative to free orphan works in its collections by building a carefully curated online list called the Orphan Works List (OWL). You can see the first stages of the OWL project here: http://bit.ly/ProjectOWL

We are excited by the possibility that this report and OWL could change the face of the orphan-works problem in the United States. This research was made possible by a grant to the Harvard Library from the Arcadia Fund. We thank both the Arcadia Fund and the Harvard Library for their support.

Text of the report
https://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/27840430

Orphan-works project home page
https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/orphan-works

View this announcement online
https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/programs/orphan-works/report-released/

#oa #openaccess #orphan_works

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Also see the report we released last week on converting subscription journals to open access.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/eu6Nsw9MEPY

I hope you didn't mistake today's orphan-works announcement for a repeat of the journal-flipping announcement!
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Not long-winded, just careful.

Is there a well-understood hashtag or abbreviation that means: "Worth discussing but impossible on Twitter"?

If not, how about #WORDBIT ?

To me it includes a hint of "Am I right that you wanted a careful answer?" and a dash of "Are you kidding?"

It also carries a strong nudge in the direction of, "Email me for a serious conversation on your good question. Or visit me on a more accommodating platform like Google+."

In the spirit of Wittgenstein ("we're not crazy, just talking philosophy") it could also suggest, "I'm not long-winded, just careful."

#twitter, #fermatslasttweet

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+Gershom B The simplicity strikes me as good. Its meaning, of course, is not obvious, but it doesn't sortof seem to be about something else.

I think the main reason I reacted against #wordbit is that, to me, the acronym was very counterintuitive. I couldn't help feeling that it wanted to mean something about words &/or bits, computing.

Thus, imagined frustration of someone saying to themselves "word-bit!? wtf does that have to do with anything?"
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"Someday, Altmetrics Will No Longer Need 'Alt'."

This headline from the +Chronicle of Higher Education is obviously true.

It reminds me of a bit of history that I don't think I've recorded before. In the 2001 deliberations that led to the 2002 Budapest Open Access Initiative, we initially used the term alternative journals. At one point I suggested that we replace the term with open-access journals. The "alt" made these journals sound fringe, incendiary, immature and untested, or more focused on protest than substance. The group agreed, and we used open-access journals in the public statement.
http://www.budapestopenaccessinitiative.org/read

Footnote: The BOAI is notable in part for giving equal emphasis to green and gold OA. We used the term open-access journals for the gold side. On the green side, we used the term archive, while many of us soon after switched over to repository. At least in my own case, this was a result of protests from traditional archivists who looked at these online databases and said, "Those are not archives!" True enough, in the traditional sense of the term. Although language constantly evolves to apply old terms to new things, in this case I found it easier to change archive to repository in my own writing than to fight the archivists. I've never heard a librarian who worked with pre-OA repositories complain about the way the OA movement uses the term repository.

#oa #openaccess, #terminology


As academics turn to nontraditional measures of their scholarly work’s impact, the notion of "alternative" will fade, predicts a pioneer in the field.
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Work
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  • Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication
    Director, 2013 - present
  • Harvard Open Access Project
    Director, 2011 - present
Story
Introduction
I work for the free circulation of science and scholarship in every field and language. In practice that means research, writing, organizing, and pro bono consulting for open access to research. I wear several hats:
I'm the founder of the Open Access Tracking Project, co-founder of the Open Access Directory, and co-developer of TagTeam.

My latest book is Open Access (MIT Press, 2012). The book itself is OA, and I use the book home page for posting updates and supplements, and linking to reviews, translations, and OA editions. Also see my other writings on open access, my writings on topics other than open access, and my section of the Harvard institutional repository.

For more detail, see my home page.

My G+ posts are automatically reposted to my Twitter account. I seldom post to Twitter manually. I don't use FB or LinkedIn at all. 

Most of my G+ posts are about open access (OA), but most of what I want to share about OA doesn't yet make it to G+. I tag new OA developments for the Open Access Tracking Project (OATP). You can follow complete versions of the OATP feed on the web or by RSS, Atom, JSONP, or email. There are also Twitter and G+ versions of the feed, but unfortunately they are both abridged (details here and here respectively). 
Basic Information
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Peter Suber's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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