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Peter Suber
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Senate committee approves FASTR by unanimous vote!

From SPARC (emphases mine): "The Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC) today passed S. 779, the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act, unanimously by voice vote and moved it to the full Senate for consideration. This marks the first time the Senate has acted on a government-wide policy ensuring public access to the results of publicly funded research, and is an important step towards codifying the progress made by the 2013 White House OSTP Directive...."
http://www.sparc.arl.org/news/sparc-applauds-senate-committee-action-on-public-access-legislation

For more detail on the bill, see my longer post from yesterday.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/j7EWjpuRjyb

#oa #openaccess #fastr   #movefastr
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great news!
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+Uvania Naidoo just updated the list of Declarations in support of OA at the Open Access Directory. 
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Declarations_in_support_of_OA

Thanks, Uvania!

#oa #openaccess 
This is a list of declarations, principles, and public statements in support of open access. It's not designed for statements limited to the positions of individual organizations. When possible, please include the date and sponsoring organization(s) or author(s). Chronological.
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The PASTEUR4OA project <www.pasteur4oa.eu/> just endorsed the guide to good practices for university OA policies <bit.ly/goodoa> that I maintain with +Stuart Shieber. Thanks, P4OA!
Last revised July 9, 2015. Version 1.3. Suggested short URL for this guide = bit.ly/goodoa. Preface. This is a guide to good practices for university open-access (OA) policies. It's based on the type of policy first adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and the University of Kansas.
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The +Association of Research Libraries just endorsed the guide to good practices for university OA policies <http://bit.ly/goodoa> that I maintain with +Stuart Shieber. Thanks, ARL!

#oa #openaccess #arl  
Last revised June 18, 2015. Version 1.3. Suggested short URL for this guide = bit.ly/goodoa. Preface. This is a guide to good practices for university open-access (OA) policies. It's based on the type of policy first adopted at Harvard, Stanford, MIT, and the University of Kansas.
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Thank you for providing this useful resource that many ARL institutions have relied upon when adopting open access policies.
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+Uvania Naidoo just updated the list of Advocacy organizations for OA at the Open Access Directory.
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Advocacy_organizations_for_OA

Thanks, Uvania!

If you work with an OA advocacy organization, and the OAD list doesn't already include it, please add it. If the OAD entry is incomplete, please add important missing details. 

The Open Access Directory is a wiki and depends on the OA community to keep it current and comprehensive. To limit spam, editing is limited to registered users, but registration is free and easy.

Uvania Naidoo is a summer intern for the Harvard Open Access Project at the +Berkman Center for Internet & Society.

#oa #openaccess 
This is a list of organizations which make OA advocacy a significant part of their mission. For this purpose, advocacy goes beyond providing OA to other forms of promoting OA. Please annotate organizations with the location of their headquarters, the nations or regions in which they work, ...
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Kudos to MIT!

#oa #openaccess #mit
A new milestone was reached at the end of April 2015, when downloads of articles deposited in relation to the MIT Faculty Open Access Policy reached — and surpassed — 3 million. The Open Access Articles Collection in DSpace@MIT now contains over 16600 articles, which collectively were downloaded ...
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Peter Suber

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Moving FASTR in the US Senate.

FASTR will go to markup tomorrow in the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee (HSGAC).

Here's a recap of my recent call-to-action post on FASTR, with some new details and background.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/G2uebVhVtBv

FASTR is the strongest bill ever introduced in Congress requiring open access to federally-funded research. 

We already have the 2008 NIH policy, but it only covers one agency. We already have the 2013 Obama directive requiring about two dozen federal agencies to adopt OA mandates, but the next President could rescind it.

FASTR would subsume and extend the NIH policy. FASTR would solidify the Obama directive by grounding these agency policies in legislation. Moreover, FASTR would strengthen the NIH policy and Obama directive by requiring reuse rights or open licensing. It has bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate. 

FASTR has been introduced in two sessions of Congress (February 2013 and March 2015), and its predecessor, FRPAA (Federal Research Public Access Act), was introduced in three (May 2006, April 2010, February 2012). Neither FASTR nor FRPAA has gotten to the stage of markup and a committee vote. That's why tomorrow's markup is so big.

For the reasons why FASTR is stronger than the Obama directive, see my 2013 article comparing the two.
http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/10528299

FASTR is stronger than the NIH policy and the Obama directive on reuse rights and open licensing. Here's why, in an excerpt from the article above:

"In three separate places, FASTR calls for agency policies to permit 'productive reuse' and 'computational analysis by state-of-the-art technologies'. I like the phrase "computational analysis by state-of-the-art technologies" better than 'text-mining'. FASTR makes agency policies evolve to permit new kinds of reuse, not just the kind represented by 'text-mining' circa 2013....The White House directive takes steps in the same direction but doesn't go as far. It encourages 'public-private collaboration to...maximize the potential for...creative reuse to enhance value to all stakeholders'.... 'Creative reuse' is essentially equivalent to FASTR's 'productive reuse'....The snag is that the directive doesn't actually require policies to maximize that potential. Instead it 'encourages' it, and it encourages it through 'public-private collaboration' rather than directly through open-licensing terms....FASTR requires agencies to study 'whether [deposited OA] research papers should include a royalty-free copyright license that is available to the public and that permits the reuse of those research papers, on the condition that attribution is given to the author or authors of the research and any others designated by the copyright owner'....Agencies that don't require CC-BY licenses must essentially explain why, and they must do so every year....That's why I've been telling colleagues that FASTR tacitly recommends CC-BY...."

While the Obama directive was always weaker than FASTR on reuse rights, the Obama White House has approved agency policies that don't even live up to its weaker standard. See my August 2014 criticism of the Department of Energy for not living up to the White House guidelines. The same could be said about every subsequent agency policy elicited by the White House directive. Of course, the real problem lies in fact that the White House abandoned the reuse provision of its own guidelines.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/ZHRXEvLoq4n

As originally written, FASTR was also stronger than the NIH policy and the Obama directive on embargoes. The NIH policy permits embargoes up to 12 months, and the Obama directive makes 12 months the default. FASTR originally capped embargoes at 6 months for all covered agencies. However, just this week as the bill was approaching markup, Ron Johnson (R-WI) and Tom Carper (D-DE), the HSGAC chairman and ranking member, introduced an amendment allowing embargoes up to 12 months. Tomorrow's markup will deal with the bill as amended. 

There's no doubt that this amendment is bad news. It weakens the bill and compromises the public interest. 

On the other hand, there's still no doubt that the bill is stronger than the NIH policy and Obama directive, if only for its strong, unambiguous position on reuse rights. 

Moreover, if you're willing to measure small differences, FASTR continues to be better on embargoes. Even as amended, FASTR would encourage embargoes shorter than 12 months, allow petitions to shorten embargoes to come from researchers, agency officials, and members of the public, and let the petitions be decided by the agencies. It's a process that favors the public over publishers.

Yesterday SPARC issued a good memo on the nature of the amendment and political circumstances that led to it.
http://sparc.arl.org/blog/fastr-be-considered-senate-committee

Publishers lobbied fiercely for this amendment. For my most recent short attempt to answer their arguments, see this January 2014 post. 
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/gPRFVdDD8Dg

(Another result of publisher lobbying: John McCain withdrew as a co-sponsor of FASTR.)

Finally, let me point out one more benefit of FASTR over the Obama directive. The Obama directive encouraged agencies to coordinate with one another but allowed their policies to differ. The resulting policies do differ, sometimes significantly. I can say from inside a university gearing up to comply with all these policies that their differences threatened to create huge implementation headaches. FASTR will bring these policies much closer to uniformity. If there are any US universities that don't care about OA (and I doubt there are), they should still push hard for FASTR to simplify compliance.

Bonus: FASTR will also nip Elsevier's new, long embargoes in the bud, at least for articles arising from federally-funded research.

If FASTR passes, agencies that wrote policies at the weak end of the spectrum allowed by the Obama directive will have to strengthen them. When the Obama White House issued its directive in February 2013, FASTR had already been introduced in both houses of Congress and I urged agencies to keep an eye on it: "What happens if agencies develop policies to satisfy the directive, and then Congress adopts FASTR?...FASTR would add the requirements on which it is stronger than the directive....If agencies were weak on reuse and open licensing, they'd have to strengthen their libre provisions....[T]he prospect of future revision to conform with FASTR, especially after careful coordination and consultation, is a reason for agencies to set policy in light of FASTR in the first place."
http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/10528299

* For more details on FASTR itself, see my reference page.
http://bit.ly/hoap-fastr

* Also see my reference page on FRPAA, the predecessor of FASTR.
http://bit.ly/hoap-frpaa

* For steps you can take to support FASTR, see the action pages from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).
https://action.eff.org/o/9042/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=9061
http://www.sparc.arl.org/advocacy/national/fastr

Please urge your Senators to support FASTR, and spread the word.

#oa #openaccess #fastr #movefastr  
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Yes, the committee approved FASTR by a unanimous vote! More here.
https://plus.google.com/+PeterSuber/posts/1fWsse55q7S
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US citizens: Tell your Senators to support FASTR!

Things are moving in DC, and we anticipate that FASTR (Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act) will come before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs later this month.

FASTR is the strongest bill ever introduced in Congress requiring open access to federally-funded research. 

Yes, we already have the NIH policy. But it only covers one agency. And yes, we already have the February 2013 Obama directive requiring about two dozen federal agencies to adopt OA mandates. But the next President could rescind that directive. FASTR would subsume and extend the NIH policy. FASTR would solidify the Obama directive by grounding these agency policies in legislation. Moreover, FASTR would strengthen the NIH policy and Obama directive by requiring reuse rights or open licensing. It has bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate. 

* For the reasons why FASTR is stronger than the Obama directive, see my 2013 article comparing the two.
http://dash.harvard.edu/handle/1/10528299

* For more details on FASTR itself, see my reference page on the bill.
http://bit.ly/hoap-fastr

* For steps you can take to support the bill, see the FASTR action pages from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).
https://action.eff.org/o/9042/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=9061
http://www.sparc.arl.org/advocacy/national/fastr

#oa #openaccess #fastr
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Thanks Peter. Currently, while our extramural grants budget is certainly over $100M, the amount actually funding "research" (per se) is less than $100M. Our budget can be found here (see page 9): http://www.neh.gov/files/neh_request_fy2016.pdf

I know that OMB didn't consider us falling under the OSTP directive, so I'm guessing we wouldn't fall under FASTR.

As to whether or not the NEH would voluntarily comply as you suggest, I really can't say. As you know, while we did attend some of the OSTP meetings on public access, we ultimately decided not to participate along with the other agencies.
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The Harvard Open Access Project (HOAP) is looking for a temporary assistant to help with a publishing project. Most of the work can be done remotely.

https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/getinvolved/internships/hoap
Join the Harvard Open Access Project! The Berkman Center's Harvard Open Access Project (HOAP) is looking for part-time Assistant for help with a summer project. This is a temporary role. About you: You will become a member of the HOAP team and participate in a summer publication project.
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Sherpa and Sherpa/RoMEO are down. Does anyone know what's wrong?

http://www.sherpa.ac.uk
http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/

#oa #openaccess #sherpa
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Confirmed! Thanks to all involved.
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Peter Suber

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Help complete the list of journals that converted to open access.

The Open Access Directory (OAD) maintains a list of journals that converted from toll access to open access (TA to OA).
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Journals_that_converted_from_TA_to_OA

If you know any journals that aren't yet listed, but ought to be, could you please add them? If you're close enough to any listed journals to improve their annotations, could you please improve them? Several colleagues have helped on this front over the past month, and the list is much better than it was before. But I know there are still many gaps to fill.

If you could give the same kind of help to the companion list of journals that moved in the other direction, from OA to TA, that would be much appreciated.
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Journals_that_converted_from_OA_to_TA

The OAD is a wiki open to public edits. To prevent spam, editing is limited to registered users, but registration is free and easy. 
http://oad.simmons.edu

Why do I ask, and why now? 

On April 16, I posted a call for proposals to write a comprehensive literature review on methods for converting non-OA journals to OA. 
https://osc.hul.harvard.edu/journal-flipping 

The OAD list of converted journals will be one of the key resources for the researcher who writes the review. To be as helpful as possible, the list should be as complete as possible. But if completeness is too much to ask, at least the list should include OA journals from all major categories: for-profit and non-profit, society and non-society, fee-based and no-fee, north and south, sciences and humanities.

Thanks! And please spread the word to others who might be able to help.

#oa #openaccess #oad
This list is part of the Open Access Directory. This is a list of toll access (TA) journals that converted to OA. In the annotation, please include the publisher, the date of conversion, and whether the journal converted to full or hybrid OA. If a TA journal launched a full-text OA edition, ...
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A few minutes ago in Brooksville, Maine. Young oak leaves against a white pine.
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  • Harvard Office for Scholarly Communication
    Director, 2013 - present
  • Harvard Open Access Project
    Director, 2011 - present
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Introduction
I work for the free circulation of science and scholarship in every field and language. In practice that means research, writing, organizing, and pro bono consulting for open access to research. I wear several hats:
I'm the founder of the Open Access Tracking Project, co-founder of the Open Access Directory, and co-developer of TagTeam.

My latest book is Open Access (MIT Press, 2012). The book itself is OA, and I use the book home page for posting updates and supplements, and linking to reviews, translations, and OA editions. Also see my other writings on open access, my writings on topics other than open access, and my section of the Harvard institutional repository.

For more detail, see my home page.

My G+ posts are automatically reposted to my Twitter account. I seldom post to Twitter manually. I don't use FB or LinkedIn at all. 

Most of my G+ posts are about open access (OA), but most of what I want to share about OA doesn't yet make it to G+. I tag new OA developments for the Open Access Tracking Project (OATP). You can follow complete versions of the OATP feed on the web or by RSS, Atom, JSONP, or email. There are also Twitter and G+ versions of the feed, but unfortunately they are both abridged (details here and here respectively). 
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Peter Suber's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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