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Peter Schmidt
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Yes!  I love this sooo much!
Chinese millionaire, Liu Dejian, has built an office headquarters designed to look like the Starship Enterprise from his beloved TV and movie series. The building is located in Fujian Province.
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Road trip! We're all going to Fujian.
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As Oransky says, “One of the larger issues is getting scientists to stop fooling themselves. This requires elimination of motivated reasoning and confirmation bias, and I haven’t seen any good solutions for that.” So along with OSF, Nosek believes the necessary restructuring includes open-access publication, and open and continuous peer review. We can’t get rid of our biases, perhaps, but we can soften their siren call. As Nosek and his colleague, psychologist Yoav Bar-Anan of Ben-Gurion University in Israel, have said, “The critical barriers to change are not technical or financial; they are social. Although scientists guard the status quo, they also have the power to change it.”

OK science lovers, here's the problem.  The practice of science has devolved to the point that the vast majority of published results are false.  Sorry, but I'm not exaggerating.  The article goes into detail on why that is, and has links to follow if you need to be convinced of the fact.

So, as lovers of science, what can we do?  I think many people's first impulse is denial, of course, because this is a threatening realization.  It's like learning one of your childhood heroes lied about their deeds.  Beyond that, there is so much pressure from people who are anti-science, those of us on the side of science fear acknowledging its shortcomings-in-practice will result in a second burning of the library at Alexandria.

However, if you really f***ing love science, you cannot stand silently by as its most fundamental precepts are honored primarily in the breach.  So, support OSF (see article); support changes in publication, refereeing, and tenure track requirements; and support forbidding funding to studies that cannot provide a definitive result.  

Also, personally, consider the implications for your own life from the fact that the vast majority - 85% or more - of published results in medicine, health, and diet are false.  Let that sink in.  How many false beliefs are you living by due to incorrect science?

via +Andrew Pam 
 
Sometimes it seems surprising that science functions at all. In 2005, medical science was shaken by a paper with the provocative title…
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Actually, I think the false rate is likely higher, but you can draw your own conclusion on that.  What are the implications if only 50% of the beliefs you have about diet and health facts are based on false results?

See "Currently, many published research findings are false or exaggerated, and an estimated 85% of research resources are wasted." http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1001747
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Macpaw.com is one of my favorite OS X software companies, and they're running a promotional contest.
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Salt shaker in spaaaaaaace... or
Granite countertop at breakfast
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Definitely space!
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This Morning at our brewery :-)

#Slumbrew +Slumbrew! Somerville Brewing Company
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the porter square porter, please!
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How to have fun landing airplanes - nifty vid by Christy Lichtenstein
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That's some precision work... Although out floats on, and it's a whole different experience !
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Peter Schmidt

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Excellent description of the choices made to deliver us those stunning images of the Universe.
Brian Koberlein originally shared to Our Universe:
 
The Illusion of Reality

One of the most impressive aspects of astronomy is the stunning visuals. These amazing color images inspire our love of the cosmos, and are a perennial hit on social media. They also aren’t real, at least in the sense of being an accurate representation of how celestial objects actually appear to the human eye. They are more art than science, providing an illusion of reality.

The reason for this is rooted in the way astronomers observe the heavens. At a basic level, astronomers image the sky in much the same way you might take a selfie with your phone. Both are captured with a digital camera, and both are manipulated to produce the desired result. But in astronomy we’re primarily interested in accurate data, which means creating an image often comes second.

If you take a photograph with your phone, for example, it’s typically stored as a jpg file. In this format, images are compressed to reduce their size, and the way in which they are compressed is “lossy.” This means part of the image is approximated, which loses some of the information in the image. For selfies the approximation isn’t noticeable, so this isn’t typically a big deal. For scientific imagery, however, you don’t want approximations; you want to preserve 100% of the available information you worked so hard to collect. So astronomers typically use a different image format known as the Flexible Image Transport System (FITS).

The FITS format is uncompressed, and stores data as a text (ASCII) file. This means you can easily analyze the data or convert it to other file formats. The files can also contain metadata, or information about how and where the image was obtained, which is particularly useful when you need to combine data from multiple sources.

One disadvantage of the FITS format is that raw images typically need to be manipulated to show anything. For example, a file might give the amount of light gathered for each pixel on a linear scale. When displayed on a screen the raw image often looks black because our eyes perceive brightness on a logarithmic scale. To actually see the image of a faint galaxy, above, we have to severely adjust the brightness and contrast.

Another difference between your typical selfie and an astronomical image is the way in which color images are produced. Digital cameras detect light through an array of sensors that measure the amount of light reaching them (typically CMOS or CCD detectors). These sensors are sensitive to light within a particular range of wavelengths. Most commercial digital cameras also implement an array of filters so that some pixels will only capture red light, and others only green or blue. The three “color” images are then combined to produce the color photograph. This is similar to the way our eyes perceive light, with cones in our retina sensitive to these three primary colors.

While this is an easy way to produce a color image, its big downside is that each type of sensor is only capturing a fraction of the light. It also means that the amount of light gathered at each wavelength is determined by the ratio of red, green and blue sensors, and can’t be changed. Since astronomers want to gather as much light as possible, their cameras are sensitive to a wide range of wavelengths. Different filters can then be placed in front of the sensors if we want to focus on a particular color range. As a result, raw photographs in astronomy are almost always black and white.

To create a color image, black and white images taken through different filters are then colorized and combined to produce a color image. With the right care it’s possible to create an image which closely approximates a “true color” image. But often the resulting image doesn’t accurately represent the real colors of the night, and often this is done intentionally. It’s sometimes referred to as the National Geographic effect.

In the late 1970s, the Voyager missions made their flybys of Jupiter. It was the first time truly detailed images were gathered of the planet. Magazines such as National Geographic had full page spreads of these images, which were absolutely stunning. Then, as now, the raw data were black and white images captured through different color filters, which were combined to create color photographs. But rather than using true-color images, the photos had boosted colors and depth. It made for great imagery, but wasn’t a true representation of how Jupiter looks.

There are some who would argue that these enhanced images misrepresent reality in a way that runs counter to scientific accuracy. Shouldn’t we be honest and strive for accurate images rather than color-hyped photographs that are more art than science?

While there’s a case to be made for accuracy, in some ways a color-hyped image is more accurate to what we perceive, even if it isn’t accurate to reality. By changing the contrast on these images, we can visually perceive details that would be washed out if we insisted on “true color” all the time. If you asked people the color of the Moon, for example, most would say it is white or pale gray. They would say this based upon their own observation of the Moon. But in reality, the Moon is a much darker shade that borders on black, more the color of gunpowder. A similar effect occurs with Mars, which we see in the sky as pale red, but is more the color of butterscotch or cocoa powder. The reason for this discrepancy is that our perception of colors depends on other factors such as the brightness of an object, or the colors of objects next to it.

Then there are the vast range of wavelengths that our eyes can’t even observe. We’ve developed telescopes that can see radio, infrared, ultraviolet, x-rays and gamma rays. Accuracy would ask that we remain blind to these images. But instead we produce false-color images, where colors are assigned to various wavelengths. This allows us to perceive structures that wouldn’t be apparent otherwise, structures that in many ways describe what’s physically present better than what our eyes would see alone.

Compare what the human eye sees of the Ring Nebula through an eyepiece, at left, with what an advanced telescope and camera (the Isaac Newton Telescope’s Wide Field Camera) — with advanced processing, multiwavelength views, spectroscopic data and the contrast turned way up — sees at right.

Pictures tell a story, and sometimes the power of these images lies not in being true to life, but rather in extending our view of the universe beyond the limits of the human eye.
Often in astronomy the images presented are not the images we would actually see. But this manipulation of images actually serves a scientific purpose.
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This is all great and all.... But in the future people will be suing "space travel agencies" for not seeing what they expected because their eyes can't do the right wavelength.

That... And I can already envision cameras being sold as "outer space capable"... Or worse, as an in-app purchase to enable the right filters.
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Present from my brother, signed photo of triple ace (!) Bud Anderson's WWII P-51D, Old Crow
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+Peter Schmidt I haven't met Pappy. Ahh, childhood memories....
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Turns out my favorite colors are the sea, from the air

Green, blue, speedboat
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God willing!  You are so kind that just the thought of someone making such an amazing offer makes my spirits soar.
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Researchers automatically construct thousands of time lapse movies from photos shared online.  Check these out:
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That was cool,;)
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Like excellent acting and story?  Like Star Trek?  Watch this, then :-)
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Fun, in progress
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Seize the sky!
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President and COO of Linear Air


Shameless commerce: Air taxi isn't extravagantly expensive like NetJets, but offers most of the same awesomeness at prices just a bit more than the (disappointing) airlines.   See www.linearair.com to travel on cool aircraft and be happier.

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