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Peter Scarth
271 followers -
Builder of things, FOSS tinkerer, #opendata facilitator, cyclist, scientist, hardware hacker.
Builder of things, FOSS tinkerer, #opendata facilitator, cyclist, scientist, hardware hacker.

271 followers
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Campsite for the last few days.
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Ready for #PortalAppealReview 104 to 7

Type of Appeal: Portal Rejected
Portal Title: Mt Barney Historical Survey Mark
Location: 28°16' 50.1431" S, 152°41' 54.3429" E
Google Maps View (see the mark if you pan down): https://www.google.com/maps/views/view/118268620686630580163/gphoto/6024952119034701794  
Survey Document (Including original 1929 Survey report): https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw_PvFi-ngOJTDFORmE5OWFsZm8/view?usp=sharing

Description: This portal is a brass first order class A survey mark at the summit of Mt Barney in Mt Barney National Park that was installed in April 1929. The portal meets the following criteria:

A LOCATION WITH A COOL STORY, A PLACE IN HISTORY OR EDUCATIONAL VALUE
The Mt Barney Trig, installed in April 1929, was one of the original survey markers in Queensland, with the location chosen for maximum viability in all directions (see the Maps View image). It was installed by the now disbanded Royal Australian Survey Corps: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Australian_Survey_Corps and was originally a 303 shell case cemented in a hole drilled in the rock. In 1974 the site was resurveyed and the marker upgraded to the current brass plaque.

A HIDDEN GEM OR HYPER-LOCAL SPOT
Mt Barney is the fifth highest mountain in Queensland and is often regarded as one of the most impressive parts of the Scenic Rim. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Barney The National park is a popular local destination for bushwalkers and campers.

A POINT OF INTEREST THAT FACILITATES DISCOVERY / EXERCISE
Mt Barney National Park has some of the best (and some of the hardest) walks in South East Queensland, Australia. Animal species found on the mountain include platypus, rock wallabies and Coxen's Fig Parrot. Heath vegetation on the mountain provides habitat for a colony of the endangered Eastern Bristlebird. The submitted portal and tracks to it are publicly accessible and is entirely within the national park. It can be reached as part of a day walk or groups can camp nearby. By virtue of it's elevation it enjoys good mobile phone reception.
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votes visible to Public
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93%
Review this appeal! [Yes]
93%
7%
Not a valid/complete appeal. [No]
7%

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After uploading school science experiment photos, this cool    #autoawesome  of melting butter, honey, vinegar and water appeared in my drive folder.
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Raspberry Pi Powered Christmas Tree. 8 independent LED circuits controlled by #Python sequencer. Random synthesized voice messages of good cheer like "I am a Christmas Tree", "Don't Forget Baby Jesus" and "I hope you have been good this year".  Also has complete "Mr Hankey's Christmas Classics" built in. #bestTreeEver
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When we package science into apps, do we need to consider design? I've been asking myself this question after attending a workshop to discuss a pretty large project linking across Government and Natural Resource Management (NRM) groups which aims "...to provide land managers with systems, tools, data, and skills needed to dramatically improve access to farm-scale information and knowledge. These capabilities will underpin better management decisions and measurable improvements in landscape condition and productivity". http://www.crcsi.com.au/Research/Commissioned-Research/NRM-Spatial-Information-Hub .

I asked where the designers were?  Designers to build the user experience, construct the emotional buy-in and constantly question, observe, network, and experiment with the product. I personally believe that to build understandable land management tools that will engage users you need designers in the team from the start. The answer I got was something like this: "we need to build a tool to get interest and buy in, then we'll make it look good".  This fundamentally devalues designers and their input, and, if I understand the problem of "engaging landholders to better understand and make informed land management decisions", shows a lack of understanding of the simplification and aggregation process required to communicate the science in an accessible and frictionless way.

I am clearly not a designer, but I really believe that these days, publicly funded, public good projects need designers centrally involved from the start. There is too much choice and too much good design out there to adopt the classical "build it and they will come" approach. The linked post is a nice example of why Disruption by design is a thing.

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If you are in Brisbane, please check this out. It's a really nice space but needs some Kickstarter love: Brisbane's Ultimate Hub for Creative Innovators by HSBNE http://kck.st/1vlfz4i

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Very foggy ride up to the vineyards in the Ruwer valley. Just missed the harvest. ..
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Some nice Aussie arduino projects up on Kickstarter right now. I've backed them both:
MicroLink GSM - tiny, Arduino compatible, rapid prototyping http://kck.st/1pPE2dr
DeB: The world's first device browser system by John Schultz http://kck.st/1Dulsjs

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If you are in the University or public administration sector this is really worth a listen if you missed it on RN. Made me stop and think.
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