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Peter D'Hoye (petur)
Works at Dekimo
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Wow... is this true?

"Qualcomm has decided not to release the OpenGLES 3.1 driver, which is required by google for android 7 official update approval, on snapdragon phones with adreno 3xx or lower GPUs, for example, the z3, which uses the SD801, which is a former flagship CPU.
Other CPUs with Adreno 3xx or lower include SD 200,210,212,410,412,800,801 and many more
Basically, Qualcomm just fucked almost everyone over."
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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"CLASS: This guy did a homemade #Olympics  and it's absolutely hilarious...😂😂😂

(Credit:@RemiGaillard_)"

https://twitter.com/bewarmers/status/763467470502060032
CLASS: This guy did a homemade #Olympics and it's absolutely hilarious... (Credit:@RemiGaillard_). 1:84. 1:10 pm - 10 Aug 2016. 1359 Retweets1003 likes. Reply to @BeWarmers. Replies. Paul Anthony · 1h. Paul Anthony @PaulAnthonyJ. @BeWarmers @RemiGaillard_ @Furedogg.
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Facebook will Krieg. Google plus hat nicht mal Ads... 
Facebook is going to start forcing ads to appear for all users of its desktop website, even if they use ad-blocking software.
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Stealing cars using only a laptop... gone in 6 minutes!
 
LYNCHBURG, Va. (WSET) - Houston, Texas police announced the arrest of two men accused of stealing about 30 Jeep and Dodge vehicles. Authorities say they did it by using a laptop computer.Police tell KTRK they've been watching these guys for a while but wer
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Hello Backers! Thanks you for all your help. This wouldn’t have been possible without you. Cubit Workshop Version 1.0 is up on our website! You can download it here:http://cubit.cc/downloads.phpWe’ve been pushing hard to get Workshop ready for you and the first version is now ready for download! Check out the interactive tutorials and get familiar with how to use Workshop before your kit arrives. Shipping UpdateKits are starting to ship out! Our ...
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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In its shareholders letter released today for the second quarter 2016, Tesla confirmed that “some Model 3 production equipment is already on line, including initial capacity in stamping and p…
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That's exactly what I had in mind

Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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That reflection of the Weisses logo is freaking me out, man.

Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Tip of the day: if IceDove crashes after the latest update (testing/unstable), set "javascript.options.baselinejit" to "false"
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That solved my Icedove crashes for now. I'd been running Thunderbird from my /home in order to use email, since Icedove wouldn't run, just segfaulted. Supposedly an updated version is on the way, but it's not in the Sid repo yet.
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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There was (something) hiding in the battery pack
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Peter D'Hoye (petur)

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Faraday cages are one of the most basic tools in electrical anything. They're based on the principle that if you place a hollow, conductive container inside an electromagnetic field, then no matter what that field is on the outside, the container shields it: inside the container, the field is zero. These also work in reverse: if you put a field source inside a conductive container, the container will prevent that field from getting out.

This is pretty useful if you want to do something that could produce dangerous fields, like use microwaves to heat food. By wrapping it in a Faraday cage, you make sure that the resulting fields don't also heat everything in their vicinity.

Now, most Faraday cages aren't solid, conductive containers; it's been known for a long time that a wire mesh works just as well. Except it turns out that it doesn't.

Faraday invented the cage in 1836. From then until roughly the 1940's, the correct functioning of mesh cages has been a combination of lore and practical engineering: if you really care that your cage works (like in a microwave oven), you build it and measure what happens. The theory of them was worked out by Feynman in the 1940's – except it turns out that Feynman simply did it wrong. (In particular, he looked at wire meshes with constant charge on them, not constant voltage; the math was right, it simply solved the wrong problem)

According to Feynman's solution, what matters for a working Faraday cage is the proximity of the wires. Roughly, the depth into the cage at which it provides the needed field suppression drops exponentially as the wires move closer together. It turns out this isn't right: fields decay only linearly with wire spacing. What really matters is the thickness of the wires: the suppression does scale exponentially with that.

In practice, this explains a lot of open mysteries, like why your cell phone works inside an elevator, but not inside an underground parking garage. Elevators, under the old theory, should have been pretty good Faraday cages; how do the radio signals, which are just EM fields, get out? It turns out they aren't very good Faraday cages at all. Likewise, garages don't tend to have deliberate EM shielding on them, but they do have lots of rebar, and windows which are often grated. Put those together and the new theory tells you that you have a great Faraday cage.

Also in practice, this team now has a good method for calculating how Faraday cages will actually work ahead of time. It's not rocket science; it's simply solving the differential equations of electrodynamics for a cage. You can see some of the results in pictures below, where the density of lines indicates the field strength. (In all of those pictures, an EM source is to the right of the cage)

The moral of this story: if everyone assumes that there's a good theory for something, but nobody can actually find it worked out in detail, there's a good chance that there actually isn't one.

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By Lloyd N. Trefethen Nearly everyone has heard of the Faraday cage effect. So when I needed to learn about it, I assumed it would be a matter of looking in some standard physics books, maybe the ones I’d studied as an undergraduate. This was the beginning of a journey of surprises. The Faraday cage effect involves shielding of electrostatic and electromagnetic fields. A closed metal cavity makes a perfect shield, with zero fields inside, and tha...
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It's quite interesting. I have read the blog and the counter-argument. I don't know which one is right but something strikes me: Trefethen says that Feynman solved the wrong problem and nothing else. The counter-argument post says Trefethen is wrong because he is not a physicist but a numerical analysist. Not only this is a very weak attack but also it has very vague statement like "I tend to think that all" or "I believe" to try to disprove it. It seems to me that whoever is right, the counter-argument post is the classical example of an emotional answer of someone trying to prove Feynman must have been right (despite what he says). Thus it is not convincing. Put some "physicist vs numerical analysis" religious war and you have ... this. I would love to have the final answer though :)
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petur
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Embedded Developer
Open Source advocate
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Thinker and Tinkerer
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petur
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Development Engineer
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Senior Embedded Developer, I make the stuff you use work :)
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  • Dekimo
    Development Engineer, present
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New and clean, most staff even genuinly friendly. Free wifi everywhere but with severe rate limit, barely usable for voice or video calls
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Nice and clean, shame about the kitsch decoration
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Beste ribbetjes in Gent en omgeving
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago
53 reviews
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A revelation. Tasty food, friendly service and affordable price. Recommended
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Very friendly but the exchange rate is absolute crap, if you care about a good rate look any other place
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Niet vriendelijk, bijna geen plaats om je fiets te zetten. Gebruik nu enkel nog het postpunt (enige resterende voordeel)
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago