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Paweł Zuzelski
Works at Google
Attended University of Warsaw
Lives in Thalwil
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Paweł Zuzelski

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Please register as bone marrow / stem cell donor now. The more people they have on record, the greater chance there is for each blood cancer patient to survive. People from Zürich can register with German branch. They also have presence in Poland, UK, US and Spain.
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Nice
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Paweł Zuzelski

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Have a productive day. You are welcome.
Software for MS-DOS machines that represent entertainment and games. The collection includes action, strategy, adventure and other unique genres of game and entertainment software. Through the use of the EM-DOSBOX in-browser emulator, these programs are bootable and playable. Please be aware this...
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Amazing stuff:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hB6eY73sLV0

Just to be clear, this is someone using bugs in a game to inject new instructions into the console's memory to rewrite a whole new game within it! This has been done before using automated tools, but this time he did everything by hand on unmodified hardware. Madness.
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Amazing discovery of today:

Consider verb "to hang". It has two (closely related) meanings. For example "I hang a picture on the wall" and then "The picture hangs on the wall". The former sentence uses "to hang" for the action of putting the picture on the wall, while the later uses it to describe the state of being on the wall.

English and German languages chose to have just one verb for both meanings. But it doesn't have to be the case. For example in Polish we have "wisieć" (to be in the state of hanging) and "wieszać" (to perform the action of hanging).

That is called "stative" vs. "active" verbs. Also in English and German there are verbs for which stative and active forms differ. Some examples:

"to sit" vs. "to seat"
"to see" vs. "to watch"
"to hear" vs. "to listen"

German: "liegen" vs. "legen" - the former means "to put something somewhere", while the later means "to lie". So "liegen" is stative and "legen" is active.

The fascinating thing is, it seems to follow the same pattern of vowel shift as Polish "wisieć"/"wieszać" pair:

stative -> active
l*ie*gen -> l*e*gen
w*i*sieć -> wi*e*szać

German "ie" is pronounced similar to Polish "i" and German "e" is similar to Polish "e".

Also the vowel change in English seat -> sit is kinda similar.

I'm wondering whether the similarity in the pattern between Slavic and Germanic languages is a coincidence, or something deeper is going on. The common ancestor of Polish and German dates several thousands years back, so if this isn't a coincidence it must have survived changes of languages for very long time.

I'd like to find more evidence. Can you think of pairs of stative/active verbs in Indo-European languages, which differ by a vowel shift?
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+Erich Schmidt transitivness is a bit different. For example both, active and stative verbs can be transitive: I see you / I watch you.
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awwwwwww
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Where Your Shadow Has Company
Poster Illustration Credit: NASA, JPL, Exoplanet Travel Bureau
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160220.html

Want to take a relaxing interstellar vacation? Consider visiting Kepler-16b, a world in a binary star system. In fact Kepler-16b is the first discovered circumbinary planet. It was detected in a wide 229 day orbit around a close pair of cool, low-mass stars some 200 light-years away. The parent stars eclipse one another in their orbits, observed as a dimming of starlight. But Kepler-16b itself was discovered by following the additional very slight dimming produced during its transits. Like sci-fi planet Tatooine of Star Wars fame, two suns would set over its horizon. Still, Kepler 16b is probably not a Tatooine-like terrestrial desert world. Instead, Kepler 16b is thought to be a cold, uninhabitable planet with about the mass of Saturn and a gaseous surface ... so plan to dress accordingly. Or, choose another Visions of the Future vacation destination.
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Paweł Zuzelski

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Are there natural languages using voice as a medium (i.e. not sign languages) that don't have the concept of words?

Each language I know about seems to use clearly defined words, and I am not sure how that would work. But I am wondering whether the concept of words is truly universal.
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Hmmm, http://kochanski.org/blog/?p=375 argues that the concept of "a word" is problematic even in English. And gives some more examples of languages where words don't exist in European sense.
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Pytanie do osób, dla których polszczyzna jest językiem ojczystym:

1. czy słowo "utapiać" uważasz za poprawne słowo w języku polskim
2. czy jego znaczenie wraz ze wszystkimi niuansami aspektu (dokonaność, powtarzalność, itp) jest dla Ciebie oczywiste

(for my followers who can't read Polish, in case they care)
A question for native users of Polish:
1. do you consider the verb "utapiać" a correct word in Polish
2. is its meaning, including nuanses of aspect (perfectivness, iterativness) obvious to you
 ·  Translate
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Poprawne, oczywiste
24%
Poprawne, nie oczywiste
41%
Nie poprawne, oczywiste
29%
Nie poprawne, nie oczywiste
6%
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Ouch. Racja.
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Yay?
Greenpeace accuses government of ignoring scientists over fate of Białowieża woodland, home to 20,000 animal species and Europe’s tallest trees
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Paweł Zuzelski

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Meet the men who navigate arguably the world's most dangerous road in order to ferry goods to remote mountain villages.
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Paweł Zuzelski

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Hey, +Thomas Biskup, is that a bug or legit trick?

The trick is to zap \oD on IC:5 near the bottom edge and go through the openning.
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Have them in circles
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Education
  • University of Warsaw
    Math, 2003 - 2011
  • Bednarska
    Rocznik Banany, klasa Bagno, 1999 - 2003
Basic Information
Other names
باول
Story
Tagline
Follow me for pics of alpacas.
Work
Employment
  • Google
    Site Reliability Engineer, 2011 - present
  • TouK
    System Administrator, 2007 - 2010
  • Sel-Telecom
    System Administrator, 2003 - 2007
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Thalwil
Previously
Warszawa - Toruń
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+41797881548
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  • One More Dash
Starter: AWESOME, THE BEST THING I HAVE EVER HAD! Food: pizza parma was way too salty. Beer: German standard, disappointing. Staff: friendly.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Miły wystrój wnętrza. Dobra zupa gulaszowa. Przeciętny makaron.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
33 reviews
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Food: 5/5, Interior: 5/5, Service: good (though some French helps), Crème Brulé: awesome.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
For a romantic weekend with secret lover. Absolutely charming place. Just a few rooms, but the standard is equivalent of 3* or even 4*. Rooms are clean and comfortable. Beautiful place on the edge of Wigry National Park, at the shore of a small lake. Good breakfast. Friendly staff. Note there is no restaurant here. But nearby Suwałki offer many restaurants. Also restaurant in Camedule monastery in Wigry is an option.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Avoid this place. Let me start with things that were nice: - location is really great: in a picturesque bay of the lake. The lake is to the north west, so in the summer you can enjoy sunsets over the water. - breakfast was surprisingly good. Now, what is bad: everything else. - surrounding of the hotel is total mess (except for the lake side). - rooms are dirty, hot and humid. - bathroom is okayish but smelly. - personnel is nice towards guests, but when they think nobody hears, they yell at each other and abuse swear words. Extra points if you understand Polish. - restaurant is poor (except for breakfasts, see above). Very poor selection, meals aren't tasty. To summarize: I enjoyed a night here anyways. But if I had come here with a loved one, I'd have had bad time. The place isn't worth three stars. Also it's severly overpriced for the quality.
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Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago