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Paul Natsuo Kishimoto
Works at MIT Joint Program on the Science & Policy of Global Change
Attended Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
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Work
Occupation
Research Associate, MIT Joint Program on the Science & Policy of Global Change
Employment
  • MIT Joint Program on the Science & Policy of Global Change
    Research Associate, 2012 - present
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Research Assistant, 2010 - 2012
  • University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies
    Research Assistant, 2008 - 2010
  • ShawCor Ltd.
    Professional Experience Year, 2006 - 2007
  • University of Toronto
    Teaching Assistant, 2008 - 2010
  • Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation
    Intern, Energy Policy, 2011 - 2011
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Previously
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada - Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Story
Tagline
γνῶθι σεαυτόν — 勿体無い
Education
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    S.M. Technology & Policy Program, 2010 - 2012
  • University of Toronto
    B.A.Sc. Engineering Science (Aerospace), 2003 - 2008
  • Glenforest Secondary School
    1998 - 2003
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Male

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Paul Natsuo Kishimoto

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A new play, World Factory, asks the audience to run a clothing factory in China – and even the creators have been surprised at how people have behaved
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Following the good advice of an instructor from last term, I am resolving for 2015 to write for 15 minutes every day! To be precise, the advice was to write material with a non-zero probability of appearing in my thesis. I realized that I already do spend more than 15 ...
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Tasty.
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In his circles
329 people
Have him in circles
286 people
Tamara Hrivnak's profile photo
Malachi Jones's profile photo
Stanis Yu's profile photo
Philip Caplan's profile photo
Lydia Rainville's profile photo
Charlsie Searle's profile photo
hesam shrifzadeh's profile photo
MIT Joint Program on Global Change's profile photo
David Kishimoto's profile photo

Paul Natsuo Kishimoto

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Fifty years ago science-fiction author Frank Herbert seized the imagination of readers with his portrayal of a planet on which it…
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. Join a growing community of people passionate about finding solutions to climate change. As a free member, you can comment, collaborate, share, and submit your ideas with a global network!
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"If your car looked like this, you could drive across Canada on a quarter tank of gas!"

Very proud to say I know some of these UofT engineers doing crazy, crazy things without any fossil fuels :) Back them!
Highway speeds on pedal power: AeroVelo is building the world’s most efficient bike to reach 133.8 km/h and set a new world record!
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To reject the notion of expertise, and to replace it with a sanctimonious insistence that every person has a right to his or her own opinion, is silly.
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Canadian governmental scientists: 90% feel they are not allowed to speak freely to the media about the work they do, 24% of respondents had been directly asked to exclude or alter information for non-scientific reasons, and 48% are aware of actual cases in which their department or agency suppressed information, leading to incomplete, inaccurate, or misleading impressions by the public, industry and/or other government officials.
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