Profile

Cover photo
Paul Mock
Lives in Boston, MA, USA
1,223 followers|97,267 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
Stepping back, what are we learning? We see that the emerging 21st-century model of higher education is an inversion of the 20th-century model in that it places the learner in the driver's seat of personal, relational, and institutional renewal....
1
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
"The patterns of our lives reveal us. Our habits measure us." Habit is that peculiar life-force that both obscures and illuminates the cr
2
1
John Kellden's profile photo
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
PATTERN: Equation
 
This Simple Equation Reveals How Habits Shape Your Health, Happiness, and Wealth

In 1936, a man named Kurt Lewin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurt_Lewin) wrote a simple equation that changed the way we think about habits and human behavior.

The equation makes the following statement: Behavior is a function of the Person in their Environment. [1]

Check the equation on the image of this post.

Known today as Lewin’s Equation, this tiny expression contains most of what you need to know about building good habits, breaking bad ones, and making progress in your life.

Let’s talk about what we can learn from it and how to apply these ideas to master the habits that shape your health, happiness, and wealth.

What Drives Our Behavior?

Before Lewin’s Equation became famous, most experts believed that a person’s habits and actions were a result of the type of person they were, not the environment they were in at the time.

You can still find many examples of this belief today. For instance, if you struggle to stick to a diet you might say, “I just don’t have any willpower.” Or, if you can’t seem to finish that big project like writing a book, you might say, “I’m a great starter, but a lousy finisher.” These statements imply that our habits and actions are determined by some set of characteristics that we are born with; that our habits are fixed based on who we are.

Lewin, however, said something different. He said that it is not just your personal characteristics, but also your environment that drives your behavior. Your habits are highly dependent upon context. In many cases, your environment will drive your behavior even more than your personality. So, maybe you’re struggling to stick to that diet because you’re surrounded by bad options or unhealthy people, not because you were born with too little willpower.

Let’s break down these two areas, personality and environment, and talk about how you can improve them to build good habits and break bad ones.

The Elements of Personality

We know more about our personal characteristics today than we did when Lewin was around. Perhaps most importantly, we know that your abilities are not fixed in stone. You can improve.

The key, however, is to believe you can improve. Carol Dweck, a Stanford professor, has become well-known for her work analyzing the differences between the fixed mindset and the growth mindset (http://jamesclear.com/fixed-mindset-vs-growth-mindset). When you are using a fixed mindset, you believe that your abilities in a particular area are fixed. When you are using a growth mindset, you believe that you can improve, learn, and build upon your current abilities.

While reading Dweck’s best-selling book, Mindset (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FCKPHG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B000FCKPHG&linkCode=as2&tag=jamesclear-20&linkId=2DCVNMAS5OTTSBWA), I found it interesting that the same person can have a growth mindset in one area and a fixed mindset in another.

In other words, your identity and beliefs play a role in your habits (http://jamesclear.com/identity-based-habits) and if you’re looking to create a new identity, you have to cast a vote for that identity (http://jamesclear.com/identity-votes). As I have covered before, the best way to improve your abilities and skills is through deliberate practice (http://jamesclear.com/deliberate-practice).

The Elements of Environment

The second factor in Lewin’s Equation, environment, can often seem like something that happens to us rather than something we have control over. It can be difficult to change where you work, who you’re surrounded by, and where you live. That said, there are actually quite a few strategies that you can use to adjust your environment and build better habits.

First, you can do what BJ Fogg calls “designing for laziness.” Fogg wanted to reduce the amount of popcorn he ate, so he took the bag of popcorn out of his kitchen, climbed the ladder in his garage, and put the popcorn on the highest shelf. If he really wanted popcorn, he could always go to the garage, get the ladder, and climb up to get it. But his default decision when he was feeling lazy would be to make a better choice. By designing his environment for laziness, Fogg made it easier to stick with healthier habits. I have mentioned a variety of other ways you can design for laziness in this article (http://jamesclear.com/jonas-salk).

Second, the physical space you live in and the arrangement of the things you come across can dramatically alter your behavior. For example, in his book Nudge (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A5DCALY/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00A5DCALY&linkCode=as2&tag=jamesclear-20&linkId=J3MATKTBESG6FERA), Richard Thaler talks about how grocery store products on shelves at eye level get purchased more than those down by the floor. Researchers Eric Johnson and Daniel Goldstein conducted a study that revealed dramatic differences in organ donation rates (http://jamesclear.com/environment-design-organ-donation) based simply on two different types of forms that were passed out. Finally, Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston discovered that they could instantly increase the amount of water people drank and decrease the amount of soda they drank simply by rearranging the way drinks were displayed in the cafeteria. This concept, which is known as choice architecture (http://jamesclear.com/choice-architecture), refers to your ability to structure the physical space around you to prime good choices.

Third, we have the digital environment. There are a wide range of digital triggers that prompt our behavior. When Facebook notifies you of a new action, you’re prompted to log back on. When someone emails you, you are prompted to respond. These digital triggers are simple ways of building habit-forming behaviors in online products and services. In many cases, these digital triggers become distractions that take you away from the work and habits that are actually important to you. As much as possible, I prefer to combat this distraction by simplifying and eliminating everything that isn’t necessary (http://jamesclear.com/eliminate). Another option is to use a service like Freedom (http://jamesclear.com/constraints) to reduce procrastination and distraction.

Behavior, the Person, and the Environment

Changing your behavior and sticking to new habits can be hard. No doubt about it. Thankfully, Lewin’s Equation keeps things simple.

B = f(P,E). Behavior is a function of the Person in their Environment.

Improve yourself and adjust your environment to make good habits easier and bad habits harder. If you can do those two things, sticking with better habits will be much easier.

James Clear writes at JamesClear.com (http://jamesclear.com/), where he shares science-based ideas for living a better life and building habits that stick. To get strategies for boosting your mental and physical performance by 10x, join his free newsletter (http://jamesclear.com/newsletter).

This article was originally published on JamesClear.com. (http://jamesclear.com/lewins-equation)

Sources

1. Lewin’s Equation was originally published in Kurt Lewin’s 1936 book, Principles of Topological Psychology.

Thanks to my friend Nir Eyal for telling me about Lewin’s Equation, which led me down the path to this article.
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
ROOSEVELT'S - THE MAN IN THE ARENA

This has long been a favorite of mine; however, here's a remarkable and refreshingly powerful take on the oft quoted Theo. Roosevelt passage... for the Creatives among us

h/t +Carrie Preston 
1
Paul Mock's profile photo
 
if you're not failing, you're not really 'showing up'
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
FORTY-FOUR FACTS: Alternative Finance in the UK
 
44 facts about alternative finance in the UK from our new study on the rapidly growing sector www.nesta.org.uk/alternative-finance
View original post
1
Paul Mock's profile photo
 
not just a great visualization, but a patterning side note - 44 is a tribonacci (variation on the fibonacci)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generalizations_of_Fibonacci_numbers#Tribonacci_numbers
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
TEN CREATIVE HABITS: Takeaways from Twyla Tharp's 'Creative Habits'
h/t +Kim Manley Ort 
1. Begin your creative practice with a ritual.
2. Be aware of what distracts you and give it up for awhile.
3. Know what feeds your creativity.
4. Invest in yourself.
5. Scratch for ideas.
6. Develop a spine.
7. Prepare to be lucky.
8. Know when you’re in a rut and know how to get out of it.
9. Build your validation squad.
10. Just do it. It takes a long time and hard work to become a master at what you do.
Twyla Tharp's book, The Creative Habit: Learn It and Us…
2
Florin Munteanu's profile photoPaul Mock's profile photo
In their circles
518 people
Have them in circles
1,223 people
Benjamin Dieudonné's profile photo
Judy Flux's profile photo
baoho vietan's profile photo
kristina golovko's profile photo
James Porth's profile photo
Ron Briscoe's profile photo
Damien Hicks's profile photo
JORGE LOPERA's profile photo
Branimir Sever's profile photo

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
PATTERN LANGUAGE:  FOR CREATING A SYSTEMIC STRATEGY

THREE Main Phases:

what to change
what to change to
how to make the change happen

Strategy is about identifying a direction and creating robust solutions to move coherently in that direction. It involves identifying the changes that need to be created.

For each of these phases, there is a powerful Thinking Process Tool from the Theory of Constraints.

+Angela Montgomery 
This post comes from Europe where we have been for almost a month working on strategy for some forward looking organizations. Here is an outline of how Intelligent Management helps organizations create a systemic strategy and roll-out plan. We will give more detail in our next post.   Strategy is about identifying a direction and creating robust solutions to move coherently in that direction. It involves identifying the changes that need to be cr...
1
1
Eureka 3D's profile photo
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
8 TED TALKS - PUBLIC SPEAKING
If you’ve got a presentation to give at work or school — or are perhaps getting ready to speak at a TEDx event? — we recommend these talks to help get you pumped up.
1
2
Jeff McBride's profile photoChris Seifert's profile photo
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
A PATTERN LANGUAGE for Scribes and Graphic Facilitators

The Iceberg
The Diamond
 > Being
 > Perceiving
 > Discerning
 > Listening
 > Drawing
   > Lettering
   > Illustrating
   > Mind-mapping
   > Modeling
   > Systems Thinking
The Practice Model for Scribing results from 20 years of collaborative efforts and framework integration, with many dear colleagues along the way. Here is a breakdown: The Iceberg The iceberg model...
1
Add a comment...

Paul Mock changed his profile photo.

Shared publicly  - 
1
Peter Reynolds's profile photoPaul Mock's profile photo
2 comments
 
hola amigo!... I have plans to visit with Didi on Friday (her birthday...) we should catch-up some time soon too. Hope all is well there in your world/universe/constellation.. : )
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
ACTION CURES FEAR
“Fear of all kinds and sizes is a form of psychological infection. We can cure a mental infection the same way we cure a body infection—with specific, proved treatments... condition yourself with this fact: all confidence is acquired, developed. No one is born with confidence. Those people around you who radiate confidence, who have conquered worry, who are at ease everywhere and all the time, acquired their confidence, every bit of it.” ~ David J. Schwartz from The Magic of Thinking Big

http://brianjohnson.me/
ACTION CURES FEAR. “Fear of all kinds and sizes is a form of psychological infection. We can cure a mental infection the same way we cure a body infection—with specific, proved treatments... condition yourself with this fact: all confidence is acquired, developed. No one is born with confidence.
1
Add a comment...

Paul Mock

Shared publicly  - 
 
FIVE UNSUNG TOOLS DevOps
#devops
1
Add a comment...
People
In their circles
518 people
Have them in circles
1,223 people
Benjamin Dieudonné's profile photo
Judy Flux's profile photo
baoho vietan's profile photo
kristina golovko's profile photo
James Porth's profile photo
Ron Briscoe's profile photo
Damien Hicks's profile photo
JORGE LOPERA's profile photo
Branimir Sever's profile photo
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Boston, MA, USA
Story
Tagline
PATTERN SEEKER -- An Explorer of Pattern Languages, Continuous Improvement, Creativity, Systems Thinking ... BEING Human
Introduction

Creativity is not a thing.

+++

What endures is process - dynamic, adaptive and creative!

 - Margaret Wheatley

+++

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

- Margaret Mead

+++

Agile/lean process framework advocate (SCRUM) ...and its staggering potential to transform a human organization when implemented in an organic/systemic way while leveraging: the power of purpose and prioritization; collective vision and commitment to continuous improvement; order, structure and pattern languages; rapid prototyping and validated learning; systems thinking; design thinking; self-organizing teams, and truly great leadership.
 ... oh, and this is the 'WHAT'... the 'HOW', like all great things, is very very difficult to achieve and sustain.

People seem to like Steve Jobs... ; ). Here's his take on all of this:

FOCUS AND SIMPLICITY. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it is worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.

OR... how about this one from Peter Senge:

THE DANCE OF CHANGE: All movement occurs while it is being inhibited; nothing grows in the absence of limits and constraints.

Lastly, one of my favorites:
LECORBUSIER'S MODULOR SYSTEM: “The primary purpose of external rules should be to strengthen the designers ability to create.” LeCorbusier’s Modulor System (a great example) featured a small number of dimensions that could be combined to create a wide variety of shapes. "A system is not meant to be a hindrance. It is to be used as a tool and should be secondary to the creative design process." LeCorbusier insisted his Modulor was “not a system for design, but for measuring. The system alone could not lead to good design any more than a piano alone can create music.” It is the numbers that are important here. The numbers provide order, and the order will sustain the technical and aesthetic aspects. 
...... he's speaking to architecture; however it relates to much larger systems such as this passage (from above): Don't confuse Control with Order. Nature offers us abundant displays of order and magnificent systems of great scope, complexity, capacity and diversity based on very simple 'pattern languages'... and, don't forget... Nature has accomplished this amid tremendous uncertainty and escalating non-stop change.



Work
Occupation
SCRUM MASTER / AGILE COACH / LEAN STARTUP PRACTITIONER / CULTIVATOR OF PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT FLOW / ACCELERATOR OF HUMAN EFFORT / PATTERN SEEKER
Skills
Scrum, Agile, Lean, Project Management, Creative, Team Leadership, Product Development
Employment
  • Scrum Master / Agile Coach, 2008 - present