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Paul Hosking
Works at "Devil is in the details."
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Paul Hosking

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Sure - random chaos can be devastating but nothing compares to an intelligent actor with a goal and a creative streak.
Yonatan Zunger originally shared to Brief Dispatches:
 
On the subject of "moderation is hard:" apparently one of the main reasons LEGO has moved away from having any kind of freeform building abilities in their MMO games is because of the extraordinary complexity and expense of solving a problem technically known as "dong detection."

The problem is pretty simple: if you get yourself into a situation where you have to have a literally zero failure rate on some kind of "fuzzy" classification problem, then you get into a world of having to do things like "every model must be examined and approved by a highly-trained rater before it can be made visible to anyone other than its builder." To put it mildly, This Does Not Scale.

(And no, it turns out that you can't simply automate dong detection. People build all sorts of complicated things that only look like penises from certain angles. If you were just trying to remove obvious penises and rely on a reporting mechanism to remove the ones that slip through the cracks, automation would work, but because of their market position they couldn't afford that -- they had to make sure there was human-level checking on everything before it became visible. This is one of the [many] reasons that (a) every site on the Internet with any common sense has abuse reporting mechanisms, and (b) writing software for kids is an absolute pain in the ass, and the only way to generally cope with it is to make interaction so limited that even the imagination of thousands of 6-year-olds can't produce anything which would offend someone.)

Now, practical hint: if you give kids a building toy, some of them are going to build penises. If you tell them that building penises is strictly forbidden and there are lots of rules against it, then you are going to get a lot more penises, and a lot more laughing about it.

Unfortunately, our current legal and political framework remains blissfully unaware of how 6-year-olds think, even as it seems to regularly mimic them.

h/t +Amber Yust.
Funny story - we were asked to make dong detection software for LEGO Universe too. We found it to be utterly impossible at any scale. #1 11:00pm May 29th 2015 via Twitter for iPhone · Reply Retweet Favorite · glassbottommeg. Megan Fox. Players would hide the dongs where the filtering couldn't ...
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This is an extremely long article which is Part 1 of a series in the Washington Post about the history of the ARPANET/Internet and why we currently live with the network security and abuse elements that are all too apparent today. The article includes both text and some video interviews, some great photos (including of the UCLA IMP #1 -- you can still see one of the bolts on top that we used to joke were for "lowering it down into submarines"). I'd like to emphasize a couple of aspects. For those of us who rode this ride over these years, so much of the effort for a very long time was focused on just getting basic communications to operate in robust and reliable ways. We were a relatively small and closed community, built almost entirely on trust that we'd all behave properly. Anyone who seriously transgressed risked a visit from officials and ignominious removal from the ecosystem. It was such a small community that we had thin printed directories listing our contact numbers, and a somewhat thicker one listing available network resources (I still have all of mine). There's a line that Jimmy Stewart says near the beginning of the 1965 film The Flight of the Phoenix - "Time was you could take real pride, in just getting there." That was largely what we were concerned with -- getting there. And another thing, it was not generally anticipated that our work would transition in the manner it has to a wide-open, global communications foundation. Yes, we assumed our work would help point the way, but there was a general belief that the phone companies would build the public data networks their way and more in the model of traditional telephone networks and billing. That ARPANET became Internet became the world's communication network as it has was not reasonably predictable early on, just as it was not predictable that domain names would become valuable commercial properties. (While I own one of the first 40 dot-com domain names ever issued -- back when you could get them issued for free -- you can bet that if I had been able to see the future in this regard I would have asked for a few select others on that same phone call.)
Scientists worried about intruders and military threats, but they didn’t anticipate that the network’s users would attack one another.
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There is an interesting air to this.  It might be good.  One thing is that the technical atmosphere is... right.  The details degrade in to techno-babble.  What they're saying, and what the graphics show, are impressionistic representations of what would really be said or shown.  Inaccurate but expressing the look and feel of reality.  There is no ethernet cable dangling under a jet airline here.  MR. ROBOT is shaping up to be the technical thriller to AMC's technical quasi-history drama in Halt and Catch Fire.
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May 21, 2015. BAHFest 2015 submissions are now open. We are doing shows in Seattle, San Francisco, and MIT. Discuss this comic in the forum. May 20, 2015. Hey, so remember that anthology I mentioned a while ago? Well, as a sneak preview, you can see the entirety of the story I wrote at io9!
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Shadowrun Chronicles
My brief impressions.

Shadowrun.  Consider what would happen if some archetypes from Lord of the Rings headed over to Neuromancer's place for a party.  They brought wine (magic).  The Neuromancer crew have some quality craft beer (tech).  The party starts, drinks are poured, food is served, everyone mingles, and what you get is the world of Shadowrun.

I've been wanting a bit of tech in my gaming and Shadowrun fits the bill. 
So with Humble Store's Spring Sale meaning 50% off
+Shadowrun Chronicles  I couldn't resist.  I made the purchase.  I even got the Deluxe package.  And I have to say - based on my play time this weekend, I'm  happy I did.

I wasn't thrilled about installing Steam.  But it all worked rather well on my Linux desktop.  So I'll make due until I can switch over to a non-DRM version sometime in the future (no Steam... I don't care about your achievements, trading cards, sales on other games, etc.).  Hopefully.

The game has had generally favorable yet decidedly mixed reviews.  I suspect it comes down to what one expected.  I went in to the game with a lot of expectations staunchly managed.  So I wasn't disappointed in getting a somewhat flashy multiplayer turn strategy combat game skimming along the surface of a Shadowrun world.

I wish it were a full fledged MMORPG.  I even wish it had more of the mechanics of Shadowrun Returns and Dragonfall series (produced by +HarebrainedSchemes - who do a fine stand-alone and are in the works of a 3rd expansion).  Chronicles does not deliver any of that (although it might LOOK a bit like the Shadowrun Returns series).  One's character exists either on a run in combat mode or between runs, outside combat in small localized hubs - collections of vendors and a few players (including your party if you have one formed).  The world chatter covers all hubs and is peppered with players using runner slang.  But this experience is less a world setting than it is a Disney-esque staging area for the main ride action to come.

Once the ride is under way, Chronicles is good fun.  Short combat scenarios played out either by yourself (with player-controlled NPC Henchmen stand-ins) or with other live players.  The combat mechanics are enjoyable.  I did rather like the cover and movement mechanics.  But the killer app for me is sharing the experience with other chummers.  Coordination is key.  A few mistakes can hose a milk run.

Side note: I arrived a little late to the party.  The lag that was causing everyone grief is largely gone.  There's a party join bug involving (among other things) proper system clock synchronization (should be fixed this week - I forced a ntp sync and I was golden).

So is this for you?  I'd recommend checking out a few Let's Play videos on Youtube.  This won't deliver the pen-and-paper game experience nor does it do anything but give a whiff of a larger MMORPG world.  But if you're looking for a bit of quick, relatively low investment tactical combat with a mix of cyberpunk and high fantasy then Shadowrun Chronicles delivers.

Check around for a good price.  Lots of venues have sales.  Including Steam.  Though I personally prefer the Humble Store.

http://www.shadowrun.com/shadowrun-online/
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Shadowrun.  I was lamenting missing the Humble Bundle Spring Sale on Shadowrun tittles - it's back on for 2 days.  The games have had mixed reviews.  I've mostly enjoyed the Shadowrun Returns series.  I'm still considering Shadowrun Chronicles ; the online variation. 
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Man, if there is one thing I can't stand it is edition warring. I get if you don't like a game, and really it is fine if you fell the need to say so. But to go on and on and try to belittle and insult someone else for liking ...
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There are few details about some of the big corporate data compromises that hit the scrutiny of public light.  But what does indicates that these incidents were due to avoidable well known infosec issues.  Which, ultimately, implies a failure of management to either acknowledge issues being raised, hire the right people to identify those issues, or provide the resources required.  Seems that boardrooms are starting to get wise.
 
CEOs responsible for breaches?  Interesting.

That's one way to solve the typical budget and CIO conflict problem.
Directors say they're cutting security officers some slack for hacks, a survey shows.
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I think such things are business cyclical. ;)
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Targets (ha!) going dark about compromises.  Security research being forced to go underground (what - you think making it illegal stops it?).  Well call up Max Headroom, fire up the WOPR, and get me my Ray-Bans!  We're heading for the 80s.
 
Proposals for a national privacy law would allow companies to decide if breaches warrant telling customers.
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Of course, even if you only notify those effected the news will still get out and the cost of lost business will likely outpace the cost of notification either way.

But notifying the public seems a far better business practice than hiding breaches. Nothing erodes confidence like lies.
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The brains behind PGP has moved his mobile-encryption firm Silent Circle to Switzerland to be free of US mass surveillance
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Lea Kissner originally shared to General geekery:
 
I love board games[1]. I love playing board games with couples (and with my spouse). One rule, though: don't be Seth and Clare. No special pleading or out of game retaliation [2]. Please. I promise we can be socially awkward enough without the assistance.

[1] Just ask anyone who sits near me at work. The number of copies of Dominion alone is staggering.

[2] Special rules may apply for Diplomacy, which is why I won't play it. I like my friends and don't want that to change.
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