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Hey, you know all those voter ID laws that are being (or have been) pushed in states across the country? They're about preventing election fraud, right?

hahahaha no, they're about disenfranchising poor people.

Voter fraud in the US just isn't a thing. http://www.brennancenter.org/content/resource/policy_brief_on_the_truth_about_voter_fraud/

Yes, states are required to give out IDs for free, but that doesn't mean they're going to make it public or easy. Do you have to say a specific magic word? Do you have to say a specific magic word? http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/08/us-wisconsin-voter-id-idUSTRE78713P20110908 http://www.keystonepolitics.com/2012/04/voter-id-law-could-cost-you-13-50-or-potentially-1000-and-2-years-in-prison/

This, of course, is in addition to all the running-about-town that you'll have to do in order to get the ID, by visiting various government departments, which everybody obviously has time to do, and gathering documentation, which, likewise. http://www.metafilter.com/114735/Ill-be-back-faster-than-you-can-say-furious#4286947

I guess basically what I'm saying is that James O'Keefe is a fucking waste of oxygen, and he and all those who are pushing these types of laws belie their deep-seated, incredibly insidious racism and classism.
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Paul Fisher's profile photoMichael Nuzzo's profile photo
 
What's really bad is that no one remembers that voter fraud prevention techniques is one of the ways the Jim Crow south prevented most African Americans from voting.
 
I'll concede that yes, many of the politicians who support Voter ID laws are probably doing so because their constituents have been led to believe that voter fraud is a real issue. However, especially in the realm of things which directly take away people's civil rights, intentions aren't magical—just because the perpetrator might not have racist or classist intentions doesn't mean that the action itself is not appallingly racist or classist.

You also have to consider that the people who promote the creation of these laws must have done some demographic research into the types of people they would hurt, saw that it was disproportionately the already-underprivileged, and thought that yes, this is acceptable, and some have also directly used racial overtones to promote these voter suppression tactics. I feel it's important to call that out.

The issue of "faith" in the electoral system is a matter of education — right now, those who see a benefit in arguing that the system is somehow "insecure" are willing to invest money in misleading the public, and "look how easy it is to commit voter fraud!" is a far more compelling story than "look at this statistical analysis that says virtually nobody commits voter fraud!"

And I still think O'Keefe is a waste of oxygen.
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