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Paul Allison
Works at New Directions Secondary School
Attended New York University
Lives in New York, New York
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TTT#453 Opt Out Teach-ins for the National Students Bill of Rights
Thu, July 30, 8:45 PM
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What if during testing opt outs http://unitedoptout.com/, students could organize teach-ins about the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR) http://nationalstudentbillofrights.org/the-rights-we-should-have/? We've invited movement organizers and students to join us for a special Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtalk.com/ttt on THURSDAY, JULY 30 (Note the different night) at 9PM ET/6PM PT

Join us on Thursday this week to learn more about these movements from the teachers and students involved in the fight for change.

Spoiler Alert: +jay gillen -- who will be joining us for for this special TTT  -- ends his inspiring, important book Educating for Insurgency  http://www.akpress.org/educating-for-insurgency.html by describing the way forward with the students who are creating the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR) http://nationalstudentbillofrights.org/the-rights-we-should-have/ Here's what Jay writes at the end of his book:

Young people of the Baltimore Algebra Project, the Philadelphia Student Union, Youth United for Change (also in Philadelphia), the Boston Youth Organizing Project, Project South in Atlanta, and Coleman Advocates in San Francisco, are appealing to the U.S. Attorney General and the President to intervene in Philadelphia in the name of the constitutional right to an education that is implicit in the 14th and 15th amendments. Again, this appeal or constitutional maneuver is not an end in itself. It is an organizing tool whose first audience is not government officials, but other young people who must learn how to develop a consensus and then structure an insurgency that will make the currently existing system of schooling impossible to maintain. 

The students are using as their organizing vehicle a concept known as the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR), which would add enforceable rights to the U.S. Constitution as a way to extricate education from Jim Crow. Among these rights are not only topics narrowly referring to schools, but also the “arrangements,” as Ella Baker calls them, without which young people cannot meet their educational needs. These are rights that are taken for granted in many other countries and by the upper classes everywhere: the right to transportation, to healthy food, to college access without economic barriers, to recreation, to housing, to employment, to security from warrantless detention, search, and seizure. And of course there are concretely educational rights: the right to study about one’s own community and about the community’s struggle against oppression; the right to study advanced mathematical and scientific topics with small enough classes and skilled enough teachers that the material can actually be mastered; the right to develop systems of peer teaching and other strategies that result in educational expertise arising indigenously from the community itself, rather than being imported; the right to use all kinds of art—music, drama, dance, visual arts, poetry, electronic media—to celebrate and expand the community’s cultural traditions

The National Student Bill of Rights has a long way to go before it enters the Constitution, but if the past is any measure, this battle is likely to be won in the end. The concept of who is a constitutional person has expanded over the centuries, and is likely to continue to expand until it includes young men and women descended from slaves. But it is still only a tool, a vehicle, for organizing. NSBR is an example of young people articulating their own interests, building consensus across first small and then larger geographic areas, and then devising ways and structures for advancing the aims they have decided are important. When the young people of Philadelphia, Boston, and Baltimore collaborate in this phase of the struggle for freedom, they are not doing anything new or unusual in the country’s history. People from Philadelphia, Boston, and Baltimore have met before to secure the blessings of liberty for themselves and their posterity. Young people from SNCC and young immigrants more recently have talked, strategized, and acted for purposes that they agreed were important to the country in order to establish justice and to promote the general welfare. What would be somewhat new is for teachers and other adults to study ways of supporting this kind of work. Can we learn to help young people rehearse their roles as organizers in relative safety, figure out with their families how to keep them fed and housed while they take political risks and develop political consciousness, give them room and time to heal when things go badly, and encouragement to continue in the face of powerful opponents? And can we do all this while the young people study their math, while we help them read and write, while we celebrate their human impulse to learn and to create, and while they work out how to fashion all this insurgency for themselves? 

Maybe yes, maybe no. But there is reason to be optimistic, because it has happened many times before. The achievement of a system of education freed from caste will not end history, of course. Another struggle will be bound to follow. It is certain, though, that any students, young or old, involved in the creation of that new system will learn much more than school could ever teach them.

Please plan to join Jay and more activist educators and youth on Thursday, July 30 at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific http://edtechtalk.com/ttt
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Can we see link to video?
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#Fergusonsyllabus to #charlestonsyllabus w/@DrMChatelain @KeishaBlain @ellication @MsBisOnline @justmaybechris edtechtalk.com/ttt 7.22 9pmET/6pmPT 

Please plan to join the next TTT conversation with Keisha N. Blain and Marcia Chatelain, along with +Valerie Burton, +Al Elliott , and +Christopher Rogers 

+Kay Bee Keisha N. Blain, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Iowa. While completing her first book, Contesting the Global Color Line: Black Women, Nationalist Politics, and Internationalism, she currently curating the #Charlestonsyllabus for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).

The #Charlestonsyllabus is a list of readings that educators can use to broach conversations in the classroom about the horrendous events that unfolded in Charleston, South Carolina. These readings provide valuable information about the history of racial violence in this country and contextualize the history of race relations in South Carolina and the United States in general. They also offer insights on race, racial identities, global white supremacy and black resistance. #Charlestonsyllabus was conceived by Chad Williams, Associate Professor of African and Afro-American Studies at Brandeis University.

+Marcia Chatelain is the author of South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration, (Duke University Press, 2015). Chatelain, an alumna of the University of Missouri-Columbia (B.A.) and Brown University (A.M., Ph.D.) is Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

In the wake of a delayed school year in Ferguson, Missouri, Assistant Professor of History, Marcia Chatelain started the #FergusonSyllabus Twitter campaign as a way for educators to share ideas on how to talk about Ferguson in their classrooms. This year, she has been interviewed by many journalists, including a piece in the New York Times, about her use of social media to crowd source readings that can be used to teach about Ferguson specifically and race relations in general.

We would  love it if you could join our conversation!  We will also continue the work from last week's http://edtechtalk.com/ttt about Ta-Nehisi Coates's 'Letter to My Son" https://via.hypothes.is/http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/07/tanehisi-coates-between-the-world-and-me/397619/

Please plan to join us at 9PM ET/6PM PT on Wednesday, July 22 at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Paul Allison. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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TTT#452 BlackLivesMatter, FergusonSyllabus, CharlestonSyllabus
Wed, July 22, 8:45 PM
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can I particiapte ? or this is a private talk ? please link if I can 
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The Huffington Post: How to Keep Our Black Boys Alive: Channeling the Rage. http://google.com/newsstand/s/CBIwhKmDliM
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Some problematic 3D geometry questions from the new Common Core Geometry exam in New York.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/15055
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edtechtalk.com/ttt 7.30 9pmET/6pmPT http://nationalstudentbillofrights.org @junebugjabbo http://t.co/eWum9Fo7c0
@McFiredogg https://t.co/TCU53zK6EJ

Also joining us will be Jamal Jones, a co-chair of the National NSBR Taskforce. And meet him: http://www.youthforhealthyschools.com/?p=1005  
What if during testing opt outs http://unitedoptout.com/, students could organize teach-ins about the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR) http://nationalstudentbillofrights.org/the-rights-we-should-have/? We've invited movement organizers and students to join us for a special Teachers Teaching Teachershttp://edtechtalk.com/ttt on THURSDAY, JULY 30 (Note the different night) at 9PM ET/6PM PT

Join us on Thursday this week to learn more about these movements from the teachers and students involved in the fight for change.

Spoiler Alert: +jay gillen -- who will be joining us for for this special TTT  -- ends his inspiring, important book Educating for Insurgency http://www.akpress.org/educating-for-insurgency.html by describing the way forward with the students who are creating the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR) http://nationalstudentbillofrights.org/the-rights-we-should-have/ Here's what Jay writes at the end of his book:

Young people of the Baltimore Algebra Project, the Philadelphia Student Union, Youth United for Change (also in Philadelphia), the Boston Youth Organizing Project, Project South in Atlanta, and Coleman Advocates in San Francisco, are appealing to the U.S. Attorney General and the President to intervene in Philadelphia in the name of the constitutional right to an education that is implicit in the 14th and 15th amendments. Again, this appeal or constitutional maneuver is not an end in itself. It is an organizing tool whose first audience is not government officials, but other young people who must learn how to develop a consensus and then structure an insurgency that will make the currently existing system of schooling impossible to maintain. 

The students are using as their organizing vehicle a concept known as the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR), which would add enforceable rights to the U.S. Constitution as a way to extricate education from Jim Crow. Among these rights are not only topics narrowly referring to schools, but also the “arrangements,” as Ella Baker calls them, without which young people cannot meet their educational needs. These are rights that are taken for granted in many other countries and by the upper classes everywhere: the right to transportation, to healthy food, to college access without economic barriers, to recreation, to housing, to employment, to security from warrantless detention, search, and seizure. And of course there are concretely educational rights: the right to study about one’s own community and about the community’s struggle against oppression; the right to study advanced mathematical and scientific topics with small enough classes and skilled enough teachers that the material can actually be mastered; the right to develop systems of peer teaching and other strategies that result in educational expertise arising indigenously from the community itself, rather than being imported; the right to use all kinds of art—music, drama, dance, visual arts, poetry, electronic media—to celebrate and expand the community’s cultural traditions

The National Student Bill of Rights has a long way to go before it enters the Constitution, but if the past is any measure, this battle is likely to be won in the end. The concept of who is a constitutional person has expanded over the centuries, and is likely to continue to expand until it includes young men and women descended from slaves. But it is still only a tool, a vehicle, for organizing. NSBR is an example of young people articulating their own interests, building consensus across first small and then larger geographic areas, and then devising ways and structures for advancing the aims they have decided are important. When the young people of Philadelphia, Boston, and Baltimore collaborate in this phase of the struggle for freedom, they are not doing anything new or unusual in the country’s history. People from Philadelphia, Boston, and Baltimore have met before to secure the blessings of liberty for themselves and their posterity. Young people from SNCC and young immigrants more recently have talked, strategized, and acted for purposes that they agreed were important to the country in order to establish justice and to promote the general welfare. What would be somewhat new is for teachers and other adults to study ways of supporting this kind of work. Can we learn to help young people rehearse their roles as organizers in relative safety, figure out with their families how to keep them fed and housed while they take political risks and develop political consciousness, give them room and time to heal when things go badly, and encouragement to continue in the face of powerful opponents? And can we do all this while the young people study their math, while we help them read and write, while we celebrate their human impulse to learn and to create, and while they work out how to fashion all this insurgency for themselves? 

Maybe yes, maybe no. But there is reason to be optimistic, because it has happened many times before. The achievement of a system of education freed from caste will not end history, of course. Another struggle will be bound to follow. It is certain, though, that any students, young or old, involved in the creation of that new system will learn much more than school could ever teach them.

Please plan to join Jay and more activist educators and youth on Thursday, July 30 at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific http://edtechtalk.com/ttt?
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Paul Allison. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
Q&A
Preview
Live
TTT#453 Opt Out Teach-ins for the National Students Bill of Rights
Thu, July 30, 8:45 PM
Hangouts On Air - Broadcast for free

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Learn more about the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR) on THURSDAY (different day) 7. 30 on TTT - 9PM ET - 6PM PT
What if during testing opt outs  http://unitedoptout.com/ , students could organize teach-ins about the National Student Bill of Rights for all Youth (NSBR)  http:// nationalstudentbillofrights. org/the-rights-we-should-have/ ? We've invited movement organi...
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BlackLivesMatter, FergusonSyllabus and CharlestonSyllabus: How are we responding? TTT Wed. July 22
  #Fergusonsyllabus  to  #charlestonsyllabus  w/@DrMChatelain @KeishaBlain @ellication @MsBisOnline @justmaybechris  edtechtalk.com/ttt  7.22 9pmET/6pmPT Please plan to join the next TTT conversation with Keisha N. Blain and Marcia Chatelain, along with  + ...
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#Fergusonsyllabus to #charlestonsyllabus w/@DrMChatelain @KeishaBlain @ellication @MsBisOnline @justmaybechris edtechtalk.com/ttt 7.22 9pmET/6pmPT 

Please plan to join the next TTT conversation with Keisha N. Blain and Marcia Chatelain, along with +Valerie Burton, +Al Elliott , and +Christopher Rogers 

+Kay Bee Keisha N. Blain, an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Iowa. While completing her first book, Contesting the Global Color Line: Black Women, Nationalist Politics, and Internationalism, she currently curating the #Charlestonsyllabus for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS).

The #Charlestonsyllabus is a list of readings that educators can use to broach conversations in the classroom about the horrendous events that unfolded in Charleston, South Carolina. These readings provide valuable information about the history of racial violence in this country and contextualize the history of race relations in South Carolina and the United States in general. They also offer insights on race, racial identities, global white supremacy and black resistance. #Charlestonsyllabus was conceived by Chad Williams, Associate Professor of African and Afro-American Studies at Brandeis University.

+Marcia Chatelain is the author of South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration, (Duke University Press, 2015). Chatelain, an alumna of the University of Missouri-Columbia (B.A.) and Brown University (A.M., Ph.D.) is Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

In the wake of a delayed school year in Ferguson, Missouri, Assistant Professor of History, Marcia Chatelain started the #FergusonSyllabus Twitter campaign as a way for educators to share ideas on how to talk about Ferguson in their classrooms. This year, she has been interviewed by many journalists, including a piece in the New York Times, about her use of social media to crowd source readings that can be used to teach about Ferguson specifically and race relations in general.

We would  love it if you could join our conversation!  We will also continue the work from last week's http://edtechtalk.com/ttt about Ta-Nehisi Coates's 'Letter to My Son" https://via.hypothes.is/http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/07/tanehisi-coates-between-the-world-and-me/397619/

Please plan to join us at 9PM ET/6PM PT on Wednesday, July 22 at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt
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+Christopher Rogers, +Dewayne Dickens +Kevin Hodgson Jeremy Dean,+Karen Fasimpaur and I +Paul Allison  invite you to add your comments to Ta-Nehisi Coates' excerpt from his new book, Between the World and Me, "Letter to My Son."

https://via.hypothes.is/http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/07/tanehisi-coates-between-the-world-and-me/397619/

We invite you to sign up or log in at https://hypothes.is and to add your thoughts as you are reading.

Then -- EVEN IF YOU HAVEN'T READ THE ARTICLE YET -- on Wednesday at 9PM ET/6PM PT, please join us for a conversation about using such texts as this with our students ... and anti-racism curriculum in our schools... given the one-year mark after Eric Garner, and soon Mike Brown were killed. 

Please invite your friends and colleagues to annotate the Atlantic article with us. And plan to join us this Wednesday,  July 15 at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt 9PM ET/6PM PT.

Teachers Teaching Teachers http://edtechtalk.com/ttt is an informal place for conversations about teaching and learning. We are a group of K12 and college teachers who use the values and principles of connected learning in our classrooms. Many of us collaborate on http://youthvoices.net (See: http://youthvoices.net/blacklivesmatter)

As you can see from this YouTube playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLY9e9zEmLwtPnN74JE8Z4RH_XtkbO67mG and this post on the National Writing Project's Digital Is site, http://digitalis.nwp.org/collection/ferguson ... we are also committed to bringing issues of race and justice into our classrooms. 

We are gathering again this Wednesday evening at 9PM Eastern/6PM Pacific on a Hangout On Air to talk about where race and justice issues are coming up now -- as a way to commemorate this year. Join us at http://edtechtalk.com/ttt
This Hangout On Air is hosted by Paul Allison. The live video broadcast will begin soon.
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TTT#451 Reading Ta-Nehisi Coates's "Letter to My Son" Together
Wed, July 15, 8:45 PM
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Education
  • New York University
    English Education, M.A., 1988 - 1990
  • Hunter College, CUNY
    English, B.A., 1979 - 1983
  • Art Students League
    Painting with Leo Manso, 1978 - 1979
  • Nyack College
    Philosophy, 1977 - 1978
  • Grove City High School, PA
    Managed an underground newspaper, Second Harvest, 1973 - 1977
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Networking
Birthday
May 11
Relationship
Married
Story
Tagline
Engaging in random acts of commenting kindness.
Introduction
Paul Allison has been been teaching and learning ever since he graduated from Hunter College, CUNY in 1983. Early in his career, Paul helped start University Heights Secondary School in the Bronx, NY, one of the first Coalition of Essential Schools. Paul and his colleagues learned that doing school better didn't have to be the same-old, with more effort. They replaced grades with portfolio assessment, re-thought subjects and departments with cross-disciplinary, project-based teaching teams, and taught multi-aged groups of students without regard to age. 

After teaching at University Heights for 12 years, Paul moved on to work with English Language Learners at the International High School in Queens for a few years, and he has worked as a technology teacher, before returning to teaching English. For the last two years, Paul developed and taught students in a multi-disciplinary blended learning program at the Bronx Academy Senior High. 

Paul has been the Tech Liaison the New York City Writing Project (NYCWP) for over ten years. In 2003, along with colleagues in other local sites of the National Writing Project, Paul helped develop Youth Voices youthvoices.net, a school-based social network where students develop, display, and discuss self-directed digital projects, and where teachers build and collect curriculum together. Paul has also been one of the co-hosts of Teachers Teaching Teachers, a webcast and podcast that has been broadcasting live at edtechtalk.com/ttt every Wednesday since 2007. 

The last two summers, along with colleagues in the New York City Writing Project, Paul co-facilitated a Youth Voices Summer Program that brought together 13-17 high school students from different schools in every borough of NYC and 4-6 teachers to develop interest- based, passion-fueled, multimedia projects that will gave all new experiences in making and learning more about connected learning. 

Currently Paul is a 6th grade English teacher at a brand new public school for over-aged, under- credited youths in the Bronx. New Directions Secondary School will be a 6-12 that where the curriculum is available to all students online, and their study becomes more and more asynchronous as individuals demonstrate specific learning competencies within the schools mastery-based curriculum.
Bragging rights
I commute on foot, running some days, biking others. I do a weekly webcsast called Teachers Teaching Teachers. I've been a member of the New York City Writing Project since 1985.
Work
Occupation
English teacher
Skills
Blended Learning
Employment
  • New Directions Secondary School
    English Teacher, 2013 - present
  • New York City Writing Project
    Tech Liaison, 2000 - present
  • Bronx Academy Senior High
    English Teacher, 2011 - 2013
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New York, New York
Previously
Salt Lake City, Utah - Grove City, Pennsylvania
Contact Information
Home
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917-612-3006
Email
Address
116 Pinehurst Avenue, K43 NY, NY 10033
Work
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+1 917-512-1691
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240 E. 172nd St., Lower Level, Rm. B-47
Paul Allison's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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Teacher voice is our theme on this episode of TTT recorded on 10.16.13 in the middle of Connected Educators Month http://connectededucators.

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What an exciting group of teachers join us on this episode of TTT, recorded September 25, 2013. We talk about curriculum plans and using htt

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Must be 21 or under to enter;One Simple Wish, a nonprofit that makes wishes come true for children impacted by foster care, has generously o