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Patrick Nygren
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YES.
This made my day. Otters that looks like Benedict Cumberbatch.

via +Ryan Block (and I think +John Fillers may have tried to send me this also, because I saw a Twitter post about Otters which now I can't find).
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Here's something fun for President's day - George Washington

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This is seriously awesome. The internet is great when wit and boredom collide! Thanks AV Club, for scouring the webbertubez for us!

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There is only one copy of Radial Symmetry by Katherine Larson left in stock. The reason there is only one copy left is that this poetry collection inspired by science and natural beauty is the best example of creativity meeting science that I've found in a long time.

As Louise Glück says, "'Either everything's sublime or nothing is,' [Larson] writes, and for the span of the book, everything is."

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Interesting commentary, also good stuff from +Alexis Madrigal quoted at the bottom of the post.

Shows how a meme can be effective social commentary, but often loses an essential point, which Alexis Madrigal reminds us of.

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“I don't like to sound hyperbolic, but I think the word 'seismic' is likely to apply to this paper.” According to a new paper, the quantum wavefunction, which many had assumed was a useful statistical convenience, is in fact physically real.
The debate over how to understand the wavefunction goes back to the 1920s. In the ‘Copenhagen interpretation’ pioneered by Danish physicist Niels Bohr, the wavefunction was considered a computational tool: it gave correct results when used to calculate the probability of particles having various properties, but physicists were encouraged not to look for a deeper explanation of what the wavefunction is.
This paper changes all of that - with some saying this is the biggest result for quantum mechanics since since Bell’s theorem (1964). An astonishing, mind-bending story.
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