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Patrick Honner
Works at NYC DOE
Attended University of Wisconsin-Madison
Lived in Brooklyn, NY
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Patrick Honner

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Would you say the statement below is true, or false?
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16476
[The first time I posted this, I included the wrong statement. Sorry!]
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+Patrick Honner  Likewise, I'm merely taking the question you posed above on face value, ignoring the school context: you made the distinction between whether something is provable or not, vs whether it is true, whereas mathematically there is no such distinction in this case. If you are asking for a sociological argument (perhaps one to take to the people who set the related exam question), then I have nothing to offer except that the course should specify somewhere explicitly that △ABC is not congruent to △ACB, if that is what exams expect, in addition to giving some (presumably slightly vague) definition of congruence. Or better, the course should get students to discuss the pros and cons of both definitions of congruence, before specifying that for that course the definition is [blah].
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Patrick Honner

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I've been writing about the New York Math Regents exams for five years. The scoring of the Common Core Algebra exam may be the worst thing I've seen.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16416
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+Kevin O'Bryant Ha! No thanks.
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Patrick Honner

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What is "simplest form" for a complex number? My first Regents Recap for the June 2016 exams.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16444
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I don't believe I had ever heard of the expression "simplest form" applied to complex numbers this way, either. I would agree with your acquaintance, however, that it most likely means the form a+ib, since any complex number can be written in that form. Of course, your point in your blog post still stands - all four choices are in that form (with b = 0 implied in (3) (4)), but only one is equivalent to the original expression.
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Patrick Honner

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10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); GOTO 10
The One-Line Maze Program
https://nickhigham.wordpress.com/2016/06/29/the-one-line-maze-program-in-matlab/
A classic one-line program for the Commodore 64 microcomputer is 10 PRINT CHR$(205.5+RND(1)); GOTO 10 This is essentially what was printed in the section “Random Graphics” of the Commod…
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Patrick Honner

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Coffee and Cream -- Three solutions to the classic puzzle.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/1621
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Cool puzzle. I was initially confused in a way similar to +Amber Peall  -- more cream travels left than coffee travels right. It took me a second to realize that, while that's true, some cream travels right, while no coffee travels left, which cancels out the effect. It seems obvious once you realize that the net movement of coffee and cream have to be opposite to keep the cups equal in volume.
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Patrick Honner

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When in Comes to Teaching Math, Let's Listen to Math Teachers
http://www.mathforamerica.org/news/when-it-comes-math-teaching-let%E2%80%99s-listen-math-teachers
My response to this week's public debate on math education between Andrew Hacker and James Tanton, hosted at the Museum of Mathematics.
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Definitely a good read. How can some high schools require a class in "financial responsibility" and yet be ambivalent about math!
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Patrick Honner

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A question on one of NY's high-stakes math exams was re-used from last year.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16440
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Kevin O'Bryant's profile photoPatrick Honner's profile photoCraig Falls's profile photo
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+Patrick Honner Ok, I take you to mean that you don't mind the test having consequences and think it's a good idea to have such a test, but you're unhappy with the quality of the test that has been made. This seems like a very reasonable position.

In high school I refused to finish a test that was required for my graduation because I was unhappy with the quality of the test. It was a state of Arkansas thing. I had to retake it, and the second time I didn't answer any questions at all, except the essays, where I wrote in detail about my problems with the test.

Maybe this was foolish of me, but luckily neither I nor anyone else ever had to take the test again, and it never counted for anything.

One of my complaints about the test was that it was obvious that more of my classmates were going to fail the math section than they could possibly hold back from graduation, and indeed, some 20% or so failed. (I got nearly a perfect score because this was before I had simply had enough of it.) More minor problems were that I had multiple copies of some questions, they were poorly worded, focused on the wrong things, and stuff like that.

In contrast, I thought the SAT was a very reasonable test. My only complaint is that too large a fraction of students get a perfect score on the math section, leaving no ability to distinguish competent students from those who really excel. I think this is done deliberately, for political reasons, specifically to discriminate against Asian and Jewish males who would otherwise make up an uncomfortably large fraction of the top scorers. Similarly, the vocabulary section gets too much weight, again to discriminate against Asians and other foreigners. But that one small issue aside, the SATs set a standard that I wish other standardized tests would imitate.

The general rule of thumb is that local and state tests tend to be worse than national tests, which suggests to me that we underutilize the economies of scale in test making.

Anyway, I wish you luck. It's hard to overstate the importance of good tests. You get what you measure. Just ask Volkswagen.
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Patrick Honner

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My latest review of high-stakes math exams includes a directive I didn't understand after multiple readings and some of the worst complete and correct example work I've seen.
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16507
I read this question from the June 2016 Common Core Geometry Regents exam several times and still did not understand what it was asking for. “The base with a diameter of 2 inches must be para…
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OK, wow. Some of your complaints are just nitpicks, but this question truly is nonsensical. Wow.
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Patrick Honner

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A beautiful video inspired by the lovely art of Geometry Daily.
https://vimeo.com/170845969
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Mesmerizingly beautiful.
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Patrick Honner

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I was very surprised at Brooklyn Tech's graduation this week when New York's Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul presented me with the Empire State Excellence in Teaching Award!
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16425
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Congratulations!
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Why Are We Listening to Andrew Hacker?
http://mrhonner.com/archives/16257
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because he seems to be offering an easy way out? (consequences be damned)
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Patrick Honner

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A ninth-grader in my Geometry class told me she would be absent on Friday, because she's taking an AP exam. This led me to discover that over 100,000 9th graders take AP exams each year.

It seems absurd to me for the College Board to claim that these 100,000 9th graders are doing "college level" work.
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The method of instruction to me is completely beside the point. The point is, do these AP students achieve an equivalent level of mastery? My anecdotal experience says no.

But honestly I don't think most freshmen college calculus students do college level work either. And the content of college math courses below calculus is mostly--in some cases entirely--a recapitulation of high school material. 
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Education
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Mathematics
  • Wayne State University
    Mathematics, Philosophy
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Math Teacher in Brooklyn, NY
Introduction
I write about Mathematics and Teaching at www.MrHonner.com.
I am a two-time recipient of Math for America's Master Teacher Fellowship, a Sloan award winner, and the runner-up for the Inaugural Rosenthal Prize for Innovation in Math Teaching, presented by the Museum of Mathematics.
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Brooklyn, NY
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Patrick Honner's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Tell Me Why You Blog
function-of-time.blogspot.com

So, as much to my surprise as anyone's, I'm not only talking at NCTM in April but they made me a featured speaker? Only freaking out a littl

What do we learn from our students?
anglesofreflection.blogspot.com

It's been a while--partly because of work, and partly because I just found out about the death two summers ago of one of my former students,

Mathematical Association of America
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The largest professional society that focuses on mathematics accessible at the undergraduate level.

Google+
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FEATURES:- New Feature: Google+ Communities - Enjoy magazine style layout in the new tablet version - Automatically share photos to an Event

Sage Mathematical Software System
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open-source mathematics software system

Math Photo: Sculpture of Spheres « Mr Honner
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Math Photo: Straw Cylinders « Mr Honner
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Math Art: Kolam Spirals « Mr Honner
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Math Art: Starburst, by Tim Locke « Mr Honner
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White Group A level JC H2 Maths tuition: 92nd Carnival of Mathematics
www.whitegroupmaths.com

Ninety-two isn't any ordinary number; it is associated with "royalty". How does that work out? It represents the number of solutions to whic

Math Art: Student Sliceforms « Mr Honner
mrhonner.com

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Math Photo: Sharp Tangency « Mr Honner
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9/15/12 — Happy Right Triangle Day! « Mr Honner
mrhonner.com

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The Algebra of Coffee Consumption « Mr Honner
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