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Patrick Audley
Freelance Technologist and Sometime Adventurer
Freelance Technologist and Sometime Adventurer
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I hate to be publicly political, but I am Canadian, and also technically Australian. My mum moved to Canada from Australia after she married my dad. After I was born, I was granted Australian citizenship by descent. However, I have never legally domiciled outside of Canada. I have had the pleasure of visiting lots of places, but Canada has always been my home. I love where I live and I am proud of where I am from (both Canada and Australia).  Bill C-24 (it's been a law since June), terrifies the bejeezus out of me. The likelihood that I may lose my Canadian citizenship is minimal, but the fact that it is a possibility, not matter how remote and unlikely,  deeply saddens me.  

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/what-dual-citizens-need-to-know-about-bill-c-24-the-new-citizenship-law-1.2426968

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/editorials/bill-c-24-is-wrong-there-is-only-one-kind-of-canadian-citizen/article19400982/

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One of my greatest reservations about using or recommending Windows to people has always been the ecosystem of applications.  While there are countless great apps out there, the process of finding them and getting them installed onto your machines is largely one of frustration, fraud, insecurity and pain.

Contrast that with the walled garden approach of Mac OSX (the App Store), various Linux distributions (apt-get and yum are forms of walled gardens too; ones policed by the community), and ChromeOS/Android (the Google Play Store).   All three of these operating systems make discovery and installation of third party software simple and safe; while it is possible to install software from outside the protected ecosystems, this is not the norm and requires extra steps by the user.  Bad actors that attempt to compromise these three ecosystems still exist but they are quickly removed when found.

Windows 10 is shaping up to be an OS that I might actually use (sorry Microsoft, but Windows 8 is not an usable OS) but my careful testing in virtual machines has left me with the feeling that it's great as long as I don't install any third party apps.  If only there was a better quality ecosystem of apps.

Which begs the question, "What makes a good app ecosytem?"  I used to think it was based on the quality of the apps (and of the developers and companies behind them) but I now think that it's largely about the quality of the community that supports and makes those apps discoverable and installable.   There are two very successful models out there: from the the big companies (Apple and Google) who enforce policy on their ecosystems, and from the open source community which uses hordes of volunteers, good transparency and a sprinkling of corporate interests. 

It's interesting to see just how badly the ecosystem can fail when there is absolutely no supervision...

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Some significant steps towards building fully optical computers have recently been taken; this is one that's both beautiful and fascinating (the best combination in scientific work in my humble opinion).   The article is quite approachable to non-physics geeks and, if it tickles your fancy enough to dive into the math, is available in more detail at: http://arxiv.org/abs/1410.8196

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+Erin Audley and I went to the incredible Public Square talk tonight with +Richard Florida  and +Ray Kurzweil.   Fascinating topics, excellent speakers and a window into some very deep thinking.   I was especially enamored with Richard's bombastic presentation style and Ray's relentless statistics; both offered a vision of the future with hope and wonder tempered by a sense of our personal and societal responsiblity to shape and harness it.

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One of our team at LXV, Maura, has written a great article on empowering women in tech that's worth a read.  I'm in a very happy position to be in a tech company that is soon to be a 50/50 gender dev shop - something of a nirvana in the development world.  I've had the luck to be a several gender balanced teams in my career and have always found them to be more productive, higher velocity and with a better track record of finding and solving problems than imbalanced teams (either way!).

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One of the great reasons to work in Gastown (Vancouver, BC) is the prevalence of excellent coffee; a favourite of mine is Revolver a few blocks away from my office.   This photo captured the care and hand brewing along with the jittery anticipation of people waiting patiently in line for their morning dose of caffeine.
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Misty Vancouver morning. I love the fog, it makes walking to work a little magical.
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Morning walk from my new condo to work along the Seawall.  It was a beautiful morning to be strolling along the water with +Erin Audley.  Look,  Frolicking ducks!
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