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Pascal Wallisch
Works at Center for Neural Science
Attended University of Chicago
Lives in New York
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Pascal Wallisch

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Anything that helps this terrible affliction is welcome - and we don't have much - but this will be tricky.
WINSTON CHURCHILL referred to clinical depression as “the black dog”. Approximately 30% of those diagnosed with the condition fail to respond sufficiently to...
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If 'activate cerebral capillaries that form new blood vessels' has such a strong effect, doesn't that tell us something important about the nature of depression?
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Pascal Wallisch

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Amazing interview with the creator of the nuclear navy.
It does raise a big question:
Can someone get great things done without being a dick, in an imperfect world? 
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Happy birthday +Pascal Wallisch ;)
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1 in 68 kids is now diagnosed with autism. It was 1 in 110 in 2009. What is going on? 
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Name a single autism drug.
On the internet, cynicism is often posing as wisdom when it is only evidence of bottomless ignorance. 
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Most people harbor quite a few self-serving beliefs, e.g. being equal or better at something than everyone else. This apparently includes incarcerated criminals thinking they are at least as law abiding as the average person.
…I CAN do better. Because Babbage is, well, better than average. More moral, trustworthy, honest, dependable, compassionate, generous, law-abiding, self-controlled...
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"Remarkably, they also rated themselves better than the average member of the non-prison community "
That suggests a jaundiced view of the rest of society. They were the unlucky ones that got caught. I think it is entirely likely that criminals think others are no better than themselves. To them the whole world must look criminal. In my little city more than 400 policemen have outstanding criminal charges against them. When I consider the number of my colleagues that stole from the company or were involved in corrupt practices, my acquaintances that defrauded insurance companies, etc, I'm halfway inclined to agree with the prisoners.
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In the 1980s, the American Journal of Public Health banned significance testing by editorial fiat. Apparently, it had a lasting change on the culture of the field. 
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+Christopher Taylor 
I commented "it would seem that researchers are bad statisticians. In that case it is likely they will misuse any method."
Seemingly angered, you questioned my comment, as follows:
"To be serious, why would you reach for this over-generalization?"
I replied(2 comments above) and you shot back 
"In short, f-off and have a nice day. "

Such a statement is usually an admission you have lost the plot but I will more charitably assume you have failed to understand my reply. So let me spell it out for you in a nice simple way.

1) researchers make statistical mistakes:
"These mistakes include accepting the null hypothesis when it fails to be rejected, automatically interpreting rejected null hypotheses as theoretically meaningful, and failing to consider the likelihood of Type II errors "

2) these mistakes are common:
"it leads to common inferential mistakes "

(1) + (2) = many researchers are bad statisticians

3) researchers seem not to learn:
"Although these mistakes have been discussed repeatedly for decades, there is no evidence that the academic discussion has had an impact"

(3) =  it is a fair inference that if they make statistical mistakes and fail to learn(for decades) they are likely to misuse other procedures. A related paper, which I quote, below, shows this did indeed happen.

You might not agree with this inference so let me quote what the second paper said:
"However, compliance was superficial: Very few authors referred to CIs when discussing results. The results of our survey support what other research has indicated: Editorial policy alone is not a sufficient mechanism for statistical reform. Achieving substantial, desirable change will require further guidance regarding use and interpretation of CIs and appropriate effect size measures. Necessary steps will include studying researchers' understanding of CIs, improving education, and developing empirically justified recommendations for improved statistical practice."
See http://pss.sagepub.com/content/15/2/119.abstract

So in reply to your question, "why would you reach for this over-generalization?", the answer is that this is derived from conclusions by the authors of the two papers cited.

I will readily concede the paper says 'common inferential mistakes', which means not each and every researcher, but enough to make it 'common'. The second paper said compliance was 'superficial' and 'very few' authors complied.

I think I have made my case.

Now you might not agree with the conclusion and in that case your beef is with the authors of the papers. In which case  you will actually have to phrase a substantive reply.
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Have him in circles
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Pascal Wallisch

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Ketamine also works for PTSD - something else we have preciously few
effective treatments for...
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The novel Regeneration by Pat Barker, a fictionalised account of the war poet, Siegfried Sassoon's hospitalization for PTSD during WWI, is both a good read and a graphic account of what happens to soldiers when exposed to the extremes of combat. Sassoon's bravery was astonishing. He is also a jolly good poet.
See http://amzn.to/1iglAWh
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Pascal Wallisch

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Well that's a thoroughly misleading title for a study that found a possible benefit for people with clinically significant depression, doh.
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The key to attaining happiness is to understand the neuroscience of happiness - and to take it seriously.
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Disordered sleep and extended wakefulness kills neurons in the locus ceruleus via metabolic stress. Not good. 
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+Peter DO Smith -- started doing that years ago, gym everyday, about an hour. What do you think I'm behind the times or something citing an article from 2002?
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2010, about $200 billion (an astonishing 85% of the world’s spending on medical research) was squandered on studies that were flawed in their design, redundant, never published or poorly reported. 
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  Only one of those four labels is useful: flawed design is wasteful.  Redundancy can also be known as replication, and work that occurs in parallel should not certainly not be winner-take-all. The next is consequent: studies are never published because novelty is valued above all else.  I'm not sure what is meant by poor reporting, either by the scientists or by the media, but certainly we can agree that what catches the public's eye is not always what is most important.
   I very much support quality control in science, but much of this sounds like we're certain we can pick the winners and give them all the money.
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People
Have him in circles
29,056 people
Work
Occupation
Neuroscientist
Employment
  • Center for Neural Science
    New York University, 2007 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New York
Previously
Neufra - Berlin - Chicago
Story
Tagline
The life of the mind
Introduction
Interested in engaged discourse and exchange of ideas and information. 
 
Some exemplars of heated, yet informative discussions:

*Is the world becoming more peaceful and if so, why?

*Does G+ have a distinct culture of civility and if so, why?

*Is fructose bad for you and if so, why? 

*Is the use of eponyms bad for science and if so, why?

*What would a day without science look like? 

*Who is best at spending money? Governments? Individuals? 

*Is religion enriching life and if so, how? 

*How do you come to terms with the mistakes you made? 

*Can suicide be rational and if so, was it in this case?

*If science is under attack, is it worth defending - and if so, how? 

*Is fracking a viable solution to our energy woes and if not, what else can we do? 

*Is science journalism in need of reform and if so, what should be done?  https://plus.google.com/100279438294886290330/posts/i4uf42Nm4s8 

*Should childhood circumcision be legal and if so, for what reasons? 

I a nutshell, I want to understand things (Bloom's taxonomy nonwithstanding), and use this understanding to inform positve change. 
Education
  • University of Chicago
    Cognitive Neuroscience (PhD), 2002 - 2007
  • Free University Berlin
    Psychology (BA), 1998 - 2001
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Gender
Male