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Parker D Hicks
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How do you determine the range of a power on the regional map? Right now I'm concerned with a Monstrous Threat, but the question applies to towns too, I suppose.

I'm leaning toward something based on Means (3-4 leagues per point?) but some of the tables imply that the power they represent has a pretty big range (by not having a penalty to the roll until six leagues out, for example).

Hey, +Inkwell Ideas: when I use Worldographer's river generator, it draws the rivers offscreen and off the map. Am I doing something wrong? Is this a known issue?

I'm viewing the map at continent level, if that's relevant.
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In Blades, Actions are sorted four each into three Attributes. Are there spiritual similarities that link Actions across Attributes? Is Skirmish the Prowess Survey, for example?

How would you handle building Circles and Relationships in "fish out of water" situations?

I'm starting a one-on-one game centered on "The Last Elf", who will start the game haunting the ruins of his abandoned Citadel and defending it from looters. He'll probably end up living among Men at some point.

The Codex offers great advice on eventually giving him traits that will grant him effective Circles amongst Men. How would you handle the intervening time?

Here are some of my ideas:
Give him a Relationship that can serve as a Circles proxy.
Make him buy one.
Roleplay him literally grabbing someone nearby and convincing them to help him find his target through bribery, intimidation, and persuasion.
Start his Circles at B0 and say he can only try to circle up NPCs we've already named until he earns his trait.

What do you think?

Do you let your players see the clocks? Especially downtime clocks for other factions.

And, in a related question, how do you handle downtime actions for NPC factions, especially things like "seize a claim"--just say it happens, and drop it into NPC gossip? A fortune roll? Something else?

Has anyone run Blades as an open table game?

I organize 2-4 hour tabletop happy hours at a local bar. They're about an even split off one shots and D&D open table games, a la West Marches or the Alexandrian. I'm considering running an ongoing Blades game...

The Scoundrels would be part of a big, amorphous gang. Every session would be a single score, downtime actions would be handled at the beginning of each session, and maybe I'd introduce some sort of in-gang rank tracking a la rep or faction affinity, but for each Scoundrel.

Has anyone else done something like this? Can anyone see pitfalls I may be missing? Any suggestions on a district to start them in?

Do the initial Hunting Grounds count as Turf for the Rep track?

Fictional Consequence for Leveling in 5E

When you gain a level, spend 2 days of downtime for every level you now have in this class and make an ability check with your prime ability. If your result is less than 10, pick 1. If you beat a 10, pick 2. If you beat a 15, pick 3. On a 20 or above, all of these.

* You impress an observer--a hireling or henchman (DM's choice) increases their Loyalty with you by 1
* You don't make a new enemy
* Nobody wants any new favors from you
* You win a bet--gain Xd6gp, where X is your new character level

This, like the other custom rules for D&D 5E I've been posting, are for an open-table game I'm running. I want leveling to mean something fictionally, so I wrote up this AW-style "Pick X" move. I'm not entirely happy with the list, and I'd love to hear recommendations for things that can lead more directly to plot hooks, good and bad.
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Custom Loyalty Rules for 5E

HIRELINGS have a new stat: LOYALTY (LOY). Loyalty is tracked with each PC who orders the NPC to do something (generally the person who hired them). Loyalty starts at 10 and is modified by the PC's CHA.

When PCs ask a hireling to do something dangerous for them, they roll an opposed ability check. The PC rolls an appropriate ability, modified further by the NPC's LOY. The PC can even further modify this by offering money, +1/1gp but this gives the PC disadvantage on the roll. Yes, this means the average hireling will do just about anything for less than 20gp. They're pathetic.

The NPC rolls an INT or WIS save, whichever is higher.

Loyalty is adjusted when certain things happen, including:

* +1 for every doubling of the normal fee. So, 2sp is +0, 4sp is +1, 8sp is +2.
* +1 if paid up front.
* +1 if this PC has never lost a hireling.
* +1 for every successful venture this PC and hireling have gone on together.
* -1 when the PC uses Intimidation
* -1 if the PC fails the opposed ability check by 5 or more points
* -1 for every morale save the hireling fails
* -2 when the hireling is stiffed on payment


Drifted considerably from the variant in the DMG, which was not to my taste. Thoughts on other modifiers?
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A die drop table for generating tactical terrain

Take a handful of dice, at least one of each size d4-d12. Roll them in a scatter across your battlemat or play surface. Where they land represents the position of a terrain feature with tactical relevance.

1- Vegetation, like a bramble patch, extra-high grass, or a bush You decide if it's impassable or just tough. The die type indicates the size of the patch.
2- Trees, or, if you're in a forest, a clearing. Die type indicates the size of the grove.
3- A field of stones, creating difficult terrain.
4- Nothing
5- A fallen tree or some other linear barrier. Die size indicates length or, if you prefer, height.
6- Nothing
7- A hill. On a d8, this is a minor hillock or a boulder that offers some cover. On a d10, this is a chest-high ridge that offers cover or high ground. On a d12, it is a boulder that offers cover all the way around.
8- Nothing
9- Water. On a d10, this is a stream. Choose based on the environment if it springs from the die's location or if it just passes through. On a d12, this is a pond. It is at least 10ftx10ft.
10- Nothing
11- Cave. If it makes sense, perhaps the enemy was hiding in here and it's at least large enough for them. If not, it's just a hole in the ground or the side of a hill that is big enough for a person to crouch in. Does it go further?
12- Nothing

Characters in my D&D 5E game are spending a lot of time in a grassland, and I wanted a way to make random encounters a bit more interesting. This also has the effect of potentially generating landmarks that can be useful on a broader scale. This is a rough work, so if you've got ideas on how to improve it, let me hear 'em!
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