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Peak of the Season: Blue Plumbago
If you are already growing this lovely perennial, chances are your plants are looking their absolute best right now, with clusters of peacock-blue blooms beaming above small green foliage that is just beginning to turn mahogany for autumn.
Hardy in zones 5-9, Plumbago dies back in winter, only to reappear in late spring, just in time to hide the dying foliage of spring bulbs and carpet the ground around roses. The flowers begin in early summer and continue into fall, passing only as the foliage burnishes its rich chocolate tones.
Plumbago loves full sun in northern climates, partial shade in southern and western. It spreads nicely over time, but never takes over. Discover its quiet late-season beauty next year -- plant it today!
http://bit.ly/2cZjAsX
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Is your composter overflowing with fall leaves? Consider another way to "cook" them down into rich soil. Spread leaves, grass clippings, cardboard, old mulch, and any other garden debris (except weeds) across an area of the bed or border. Then cover it with any kind of tarp (an old shower curtain works well), securing the edges with rocks or stakes. The pile will generate a lot of heat, cook down during the winter, and be ready to spread or work into the garden by spring.

And if you don't like how unsightly the pile looks while it's cooking, cover it with a bit of fresh mulch -- which you can always add to the spring garden later!
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If you have fallen in love with some of your flowering plants this season, why not try saving the seed now so you can replant it in spring?
Not all seeds will "come true," meaning that the plants they grow may not look just like their parents, because those parents were selected for certain traits (flower color, size, etc.). But if you have open-pollinated or species plants, the seed should come true. Here's how to save it:
1. As the blooms begin to fade, tie a small paper bag around the whole flowerhead, securing it with a rubber band or twist tie.
2. Every few days, give the bag a shake, When it rustles, you know that the seed has fallen, and you can snip off the stem to remove the bag.
3. Label and store the seed in a cool, dry place until ready to sow.

Happy saving, storing, and sowing!
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Is cold weather slowing down your vegetable garden? It may be time to harvest the remaining fruit and let it finish ripening indoors in a sunny window. Find more tips for the September vegetable garden here:
http://bit.ly/2co5fdj
In the September garden, transition from warm to cool season crops, begin garden clean up, and guard against early frost in northern climates. Helpful tips.
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Quick tip: If you are sowing seed outdoors this fall, don't forget the herbs! Many types, such as chives, parsley, borage, cilantro, fennel, and chamomile, do very well when sown in fall for spring growth.
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September is a great time to divide perennials in almost any climate. Division is easy, and some plants (such as Iris and Daylily) actually require it every few years to keep flowering their best. So find a garden fork and a nice sharp spade or hand shovel, and make new plants from old! These perennials like to be divided in fall:
Iris
Daylily
Shasta Daisy
Hardy Ferns (especially Dryopteris, Cyrtomium, and Polystichum)
Canna
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Some flowering plants are happy to self-sow in your garden. So if you are growing any of the plants listed below and want "volunteers" next spring, just let the final blooms dry out completely on the plant, and don't agitate the soil too much in the bed or border. The seeds will drop this fall, overwinter nicely, and pop out green sprouts in spring!
Eager self-sowers include:
Verbena bonariensis
California Poppy
Spanish Poppy (P. rupifragum)
Strawberry Foxglove (D. x mertonensis)
Chocolate Flower (Berlandiera lyrata)
Eryngo
Rocky Mountain Penstemon (P. strictus)
Hollyhock
Lupine
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Want to keep the fresh produce coming even after your vegetable patch has passed? Grow a crop of mushrooms with our fun, easy kits! They're easy and fun -- and after the final 'shrooms have been harvested, the growing medium makes a rich addition to the compost pile.
http://bit.ly/2cAvvkM
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Are you transplanting seedlings into the cool(ish) September garden? Or perhaps receiving your fall perennials, shrubs, and trees in the mail from Park? Make the most of your transplanting experience by following a few simple steps:
http://bit.ly/2cw42NV
And get more September gardening tips on our blog:
http://bit.ly/2ctMTY8
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In addition to being beautiful and good for the environment, can trees actually help make us thinner and more emotionally stable?! The ongoing research about the benefits of a leafy green environment continues to astound us:
http://bit.ly/2ciyIoN
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Time-sensitive sales are great (and we certainly hope you take advantage of our current special on bulbs!), but there are ways to save every day at Park Seed, too. Check out the red tab marked SALE on the home page of our website, and you will find 4 ways to save anytime:
Items that always ship free: http://bit.ly/2ceT7rs
Discounted seed varieties: http://bit.ly/2ceTG4z
20 seed packets for $20: http://bit.ly/2ceTHW8
Clearance tools and supplies: http://bit.ly/2ceTK4
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We always like the way dried stems look on winter squash -- curvy and strong, like a natural handle -- but we never knew why they are necessary. Turns out that you should cut the stem at least 4 inches from the top of the squash when you harvest it. As it dries, the stem actually forms a barrier against bacteria and fungus penetrating the fruit. Who knew?
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From Our Garden To Yours
Introduction
America's favorite mail-order seed company since 1868, Park Seed delights home gardeners and professional growers with top-quality seeds, bulbs, and plants, including flowering, vegetable, and fruiting varieties. We offer a wide selection of new and classic annuals and perennials, as well as roses, shrubs, trees, and garden supplies. Renowned for our exclusive Whopper vegetable seed series, the Seeds in Space program, and our innovative seed packaging and storage technology, we are also proud to be an All-America Selection trial garden. Browse our catalogs and website today!

Visit our website, and feel free to browse our online store!
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Contact info
Phone
1-800-845-3369
Email
Address
3507 Cokesbury Rd Hodges, SC 29653