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Pamela Rutledge
658 followers -
Director, Media Psychology Research Center | consultant | Professor | Author | Speaker | Researcher | Mom | Dog lover
Director, Media Psychology Research Center | consultant | Professor | Author | Speaker | Researcher | Mom | Dog lover

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Banal or profound? Unboxing videos as a movie premise - Pandora's box gets a facelift
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It's interesting how quickly the narrative goes from "getting useful information" to presuming total reliance on technology as if there's no positive middle ground.  This 2017 article shows how little progress we've made in our technophobia.  BTW, I agree with Dr. Nadig that conflict, respecting differences and learning to have personal boundaries are critical to healthy relationships. That is a separate issue from whether technology can provide information that helps someone learn more productive behavior habits.  Have more emotional control should actually help people resolve conflict because it diminishes the "fight or flight" response and allows more room for empathy.  #mediapsychology #positivemediapsychology
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PLEASE VOTE If you don't like the way the government is going, don't just complain PLEASE VOTE.  Don't be put off by the complexity of the ballot. I live in CA and It took me nearly two hours to research the ballot propositions and all the people running for "non-partisan" offices.  The California Choices website is great because it has links to an explanation of each proposition.  It also shows you which organizations, parties and news sources have endorsed each one.



We all make judgments from social influence - recommendations on products and people to manage information.  This is a good source to cut down on the ballot research.  Research is important because there is such a thing as nonpartisan. 



I don't know a good solution to finding out about all the associate justices, school board officials and city council members who are all making decisions on our behalf based on their beliefs about what's important. Find out what you can and make sure their beliefs align with yours.  At the very least, fill in the boxes on the things you care most about and skip the rest.  JUST MAKE SURE YOU VOTE!
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Exciting news!  The Routledge Companion to Transmedia Studies has just been published!  It is an extraordinary volume of academics and (rock star) practitioners looking at the 'what', 'whys' and 'hows' of transmedia.  It's astutely fitting as it takes a 360-degree look at a 360-degree phenomenon by the people who defined the field.  
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“In spite of the relative sophistication of society today, people remain a mystery to themselves as well as others — and they are always curious to get a bit of insight or confirmation as to what they’re really like,” says Pamela Rutledge, director of the Media Psychology Research Center, and faculty at Fielding Graduate University.
“People like external validation of their qualities, particularly strengths. In spite of the frivolity of so many of these "personality tests", we are tempted because we all have an existential craving to be validated and ‘seen’ and know how we fit in relative to others.”
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As a psychologist, I can tell you that, contrary to any logic, traumatic events such as loss can produce extraordinary personal growth —what we call post-traumatic growth—exactly because it’s so disorienting.  Seeing ghosts in photographs were a pathway to new meaning and dealing with grief for Julie, connecting her with people, ideas, skills and, yes, spirits, she didn’t have before.  Julie’s story is just one journey to post-traumatic growth but what she demonstrates is how a regular person handled her personal trauma and by being open to some really new and, for the skeptics, entertainingly bizarre stuff.  It is inspirational and very funny.  While Julie doesn’t list finding humor in life’s curveballs as a strength, it is certainly one of hers.  Humor triggers the “feel good” neurotransmitters that take the edge of stress, anxiety, improve our mood and even increase our tolerance to physical pain.  Even if you think ghosts are figments of the imagination, you’ll feel better after reading Julie’s book because she’ll make you laugh and even the skeptics among you will probably buy a little sage, just in case.
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I'm generally a 'glass-half-full' person when it comes to technology.  I recognize that, like any tool, the impact is related to how you use it (good or bad).  There is so much potential in digital connectivity that we overlook, from economic development and social access to exposing the bad guys (how long would it have taken to find out that the government was keeping immigrant children in tents in the desert without social media or to generate enough attention to give enough voice to #BlackLivesMatter or #MeToo to change the conversation of a nation?).  Besides, there are so many technophobes frantically trying to prove how awful technology is (phones, games, social media, if it electronic, it's bad), that I figure the topic is more than well-covered.  
 
The recent report from Pew was fun in that it includes anecdotes from people's experience, rather than just "expert opinions."  Now all my students will know that personal experience is not generalizable (!!!), however, this particular report warmed my heart because it included my anecdote about my Dad, who passed away at age 91, used ALL CAPS in every email message he sent (he did not get the  yelling concept), loved to share jokes and used Facebook regularly to stay "in the know" of what the family was up to.  I would have loved to see him take on Snap and Instagram.  He would have been out taking pictures of flowers and leaves and posting his unique if not occasionally snarky commentary on the world.  He wondered about a lot of things and saw beauty everywhere.  I hope that I wonder about a lot of things and see beauty until I'm 91 (and longer!) too.
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It's ironic that knowing your audience is a big deal. It tells you something about the rampant solipsism in the world.  (love that word.)  In other words, we are not our customer.  #cognitivebias #audienceengagement #fieldingmediapsychm 
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Whack-a-mole anyone? Cambridge Analytica may be closing, but execs still have all the data from 87 million Facebook users they used to generate personality profiles.  Not only did they abuse data policies, but there are other indicators of the corporate culture: "the company’s reputation was further damaged after reports that CEO — who has since resigned — Alexander Nix had discussed using bribes and sex as strategies to entrap political opponents."  Behavior that's OK at the top, is by default acceptable throughout the organization.  Potential clients, I have some words for you: 1) Due Diligence and 2) Halo-effect.   
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MUST READ editorial on how Trump is controlling the cognitive framework of reality.  It's time to take charge of our language rather than repeating his.
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