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Osvaldo Doederlein
Works at Google
Attended École des Mines de Nantes, FR
Lives in Nutley, NJ
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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Tomorrowland was great. I don't care if it's tanking or getting bad reviews, to me it seems that most people are just punishing this movie for not being the movie they wanted it to be; but I can't see how's that fair. Some people even complain it's not the same experience as Walt Disney's theme park – who cares? Anyway, try watching this movie for what it is.
Tomorrowland movie stars George Clooney (Gravity, Ocean's 11), Hugh Laurie (House, Blackadder) and Britt Robertson (Scream 4, Life Unexpected) in an epic science fiction movie from Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures.
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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Remember all hate from Star Wars fans for Jar Jar Binks? That was 16 years ago, but hey it's never too late to find new ways to hate it! Specifically, the CGI didn't age well at all. After completing the classic trilogy last week, my kids are now watching The Phantom Menace. It's my first rewatch of this movie since 1999 – not that I disliked it so much, but the prequel trilogy simply doesn't have much replay value, which I am confirming now, but I digress. Put simply, 1999 was still too early days for full CGI characters; Jar Jar looks truly dated, remarkably its body physics is awful compared even to realtime CGI characters in current-generation consoles.

Compare this to Jabba the Hutt from Return of Jedi. I recently re-watched that – really watched, instead of "let kids watch while I mostly make popcorn or type posts in G+ or brush the dog" like I'm doing now – and Jabba still looks amazing, gorgeous. Which is easy because Jabba was a real thing; no CGI, it was a puppet (a very expensive, complex puppet that was a nightmare to build and operate and film – but it was worth it). The smaller appearance of Jabba in A New Hope was replaced by CGI in the nineties, and of course TPM shows it again with even better CGI but it's still no competition for the physical character in RoJ.

And don't get me started about spaceships.... the model props of "old" movies like Star Wars or 2001 A Space Odyssey, are still the most awesome spaceships of all time, compared to rendered ships. Though I would concede that in that case the CGI is now good enough to beat real-world, the problem is that it's too powerful and easy to abuse, and movie makers abuse it 99% of the time creating ridiculous scenes (visual pollution, excess action, ridiculous weapon fireworks that resemble Dragon Ball). Hey, look the photo below: that's how you film a legend.
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Osvaldo Doederlein's profile photoEthan Weigand's profile photoAntonio Kantek's profile photo
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+Osvaldo Doederlein True about the ears and facial features, but even the way he walks is just plain weird.
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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THE ATTACK OF THE OLD RUSSIAN LADY.  Here I am waiting for a bus that's late, this Russian lady in their eighties approaches quicker than I can start listening to my podcasts and draws her weapon: this helpful, carefully produced with cardboard core for strength and plastic shielding for protection, "Pushkin for Kids" card (more in the other side). I had to learn how this poem is so wonderful and how Russian kids are (or used to be anyway) taught poems like this in elementary school, which they have to memorize and learn to recite very correctly and quickly, and how "real" Russians like her can use these lines as an inside thing to identify each other (different from immigrants that might not have the benefit of this education).  I was released from the conversation only after the old lady was pleased with my pronunciation and memory, for both the original text and the English translation, and also located the full poem on the web, understood her commentary on grammar and culture, and promised to go see the Swan Lake which is coming to NYC in the summer. Once we got inside the bus I saw her presenting another copy of this card to a new victim. So, if you live near some old Russian lady, beware, they apparently have an infinite supply of these!
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we are not related...
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I just finished to watch all of DS9; last impressions in another post later. Meanwhile, I want your opinion: don't you also think Trek's writers failed in their final task in character development for Worf, by not killing him in the end of DS9?

Think about it. Great opportunity, since the final ten episodes, almost a half-season, is dedicated to finishing the Dominion wars, with epic space battles in the end. Worf could die covered in glory of battle. Then he'd appear (later in the closing of What You Leave Behind) in Sto-Vo-Kor, joining Jadzia and also tons of other Klingon friends he lost since TNG. This would be the perfect ending for a character that was always obsessed with the Klingon values and mythology, and particularly with having a proper warrior's death. Even the atheist Trekker me, wouldn't mind watching the Klingon afterlife to be real (this happens already in Voyager's Barge of the Dead).

Worf was already an "old" character at that point, having served 7 seasons with Picard and 4 with Sisko. It's not like there was any chance he would go on to join a third series's crew later. We wouldn't even lose Worf for feature movies to come, since those would be TNG movies in a timeline before the end of DS9. (I don't think DS9 movies were ever in the plans, considering how it ends.)
123 votes  -  votes visible to Public
Yes, Worf should have died
20%
No, I like my heroes to live
80%
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Michael Orf's profile photocrazygirlfun1's profile photoRita Brown's profile photoChris Lawhead (Pyrometheous)'s profile photo
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+crazygirlfun1 That would have been awesome!
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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Hey +AMC Theatres, what's up with the barrage of Christian propaganda you target at children? Today I took my kids to watch Home, and we had to put up with no less than three pieces:

- Hillsong, about some awful evangelical music
- Little boy, delusional fantasy about the power of faith
- Some TV series about Bible/Jesus, don't remember the name

It's not the first time this happens, I remember similar experience watching another kids' movie a few weeks ago.  This is not simple advertising of other movies that happen to be G-rated; it's clear targeting of religious bullshit to children. And these trailers are clearly produced as self-contained "evangelization" material, they are equivalent to trailers of teenager's-action movies that show only the parts with cars exploding and tits exposed. Except that I'll rather have my 6/8 year old children watch some killing or soft-porn than religious indoctrination.

Like the well-known quip goes, Religion is like a penis, it's fine to have one and to be proud of it, just don't try to shove it down my children's throats.

Well all I can do is voting with my ticket money. These days theaters are not really that necessary: I have a big 4K TV, I can stream super-recent movies from Google Play and other sources, I don't like 3D anyway, and my home snacks are better and healthier than your stuff and not overpriced. There's the family fun of going out for a movie, but I can take the kids to bowling or some other fun place afterwards.

Link to Home's website both as a signal to other parents, and because the movie is great, recommended. Just not recommended on AMC.
The official site for DreamWorks HOME. Watch the new trailer, meet Tip (Rihanna) and Oh (Jim Parsons), read the story, get downloads, and more!
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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CWB, waiting for our flight soon... Love airports with a good view of the runways.
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Nice!
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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Which colors do you see? Whatever is your answer, good news: it's the correct answer. Vision is a complex, largely cerebral function, that's why there are tons of optical illusions. If I pose the question more strictly, like what are the dominant light wavelengths emitted by this dress, the answer should consider the contributions from infrared and other "colors" beyond human perception. If I add ...considering only the visible spectrum, there's still some individual variation for that. Even if I'd pick the standard 390-700nm spectrum, our eyes are not perfect, even people with "normal color vision" will have small differences of sensitivity to each color component so the dress color question wouldn't have any human-but-objective answer if you demand a very specific answer instead of extremely approximate categories like "blue".
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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Hey +BURGER KING, your milkshake is great, but these fancy cups are designed by idiots that ignore drive-through customers. "Innovation" for the sake of being different. Just ditch this thing and use the normal cups with a full lid, tiny cut in the middle for the straw, like everybody else.
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looks so fresh
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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People are aware that code compiled from languages like C/C++ can also be reverse engineered, right? Yeah, not as easy as Java bytecode; but still easy enough for any dedicated attacker. With decompilers like http://boomerang.sourceforge.net/cando.php, you get C-ish code that's not significantly harder to read than decompiled Proguard-processed Java code. In both cases you lose most non-public symbols and some structure; in both cases, obfuscation works best for very low-level, self-contained code (i.e. your 1000-line decrypt function) but it's next to useless for most "application-level" code that needs to be well structured and rely on tons of library calls.

Of course native languages make obfuscation better, and make reverse engineering harder. It's just not orders of magnitude harder. I'll concede native code is a decent defense for "casual" reverse engineering – most programmers can't even read any Assembly (kids these days...) – and even with experts, RE can be significantly more time-consuming that writing similar code from scratch. OTOH, as protection for application secrets encoded into software, forget about it, no level of code obfuscation will protect it from elite hackers. If it can be decoded and executed by a CPU, it can be read and understood by a person.

Now, in the exchange below with +Alex Ruiz, I think there's some missing context: that +Rennie Allen is not just some C++ coder that ignores all the above; he works for a company that specializes in securing code for critical functionality such as license enforcement, cryptography, DRM etc. And like you would expect, the programming language is only part of a bag of tricks that includes "...Pre-Damage, Encryption, ... Jailbreak or Root Detection, Checksum, Debugger Detection" etc. Even with these techniques obfuscation is not infallible, but it can be made sufficiently harder / expensive to achieve its purpose. (But then again, there are commercial Java obfuscators that implement similar techniques like code and resource encryption and tampering detection; Proguard is popular because it's free but it doesn't even try to really secure code. I would describe it only as a good bytecode shrinker/optimizer.) I'm only worried that anyone may be fooled to confuse "very hard" with "impossible". It's OK if a game company uses obfuscation to minimize piracy; it's totally NOT OK if a bank relies on that for any critical aspect of securing their mobile app (security-through-obscurity).
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+Osvaldo Doederlein We definitely prefer Android, over iOS as it does allow self-modifying code, but we can still do very strong protection even with non-writable .text.

It is fascinating that operating systems with non-writable .text (like iOS) are actually less secure than operating systems with writable .text, because they always get jailbroken, and then the attacker has self-modifying code, but the defender doesn't.
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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A poll for Java old-timers: When a new JDK release is out, you want to download it and you don't have a link already, you go to your browser and start typing...

(I'm assuming you do this often enough that the url/search-bar's autocompletion makes typing the first couple characters of this URL faster than making a search or other options)
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java.sun.com (which still works)
78%
Whatever is the correct Oracle URL
22%
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Osvaldo Doederlein

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What would be your choice to buy the digital edition of #StarWars :
3 votes  -  votes visible to Public
33%
67%
$19.99 each, original trilogy only
33%
$89.99 full set, including crap prequels
67%
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Osvaldo Doederlein

Star Trek: DS9  - 
 
Time for my third DS9 update!! now for all of S5 + the first half of S6 (I just watched S6E16). DS9 is curious as a show which format feels inconsistent: it's not purely episodic like most other Trek shows, but it's also not always firm on the track of long story arcs. This is especially remarkable in this last stretch. But you know what, that's a good thing, adds to realism because long-winded events such as major wars don't have homogeneous pacing IRL. You have periods of quick development with important things going on a weekly basis, and then you have long periods where nothing important or exciting happens. But even the "intermezzo" episodes usually have some background of Dominion Wars, so they don't feel disconnected from the rest.  I think the realism should have felt even stronger for people that watched the show in "real time" on TV, because the timing of the long-arc events is very realistic: skirmishes take days/weeks (a couple of consecutive episodes), relationship issues take months (a handful of episodes with small gaps), a full interstellar war takes years (multiple seasons, with larger gaps).

Now, S5 is very good but not in the same level of S4's endless, amazing individual episodes. OTOH the Dominion Wars arc gets serious, and really complex and interesting.  Emotionally though, the most impact still comes from strong individual episodes, where S5 fails to impress (especially coming from S4...) but S6 ups the game again back to S4's standards.  My highlights include (no spoilers):

- S5E6 Trials and Tribble-ations, a beautiful homage to TOS. I can't imagine any Trek fan watching this without a huge, ear-to-ear smile in their face. :)
- S5E22 Children of Time
- S6E2 Rocks and Shoals
- S6E6 Sacrifice of Angels
- S6E7 You Are Cordially Invited
- S6E13 Far Beyond the Stars. OMG!!! Another entry to my top-ten episodes of all Star Trek series. Especially if like me, you are a great fan of the "golden age" literary SciFi from the 1950's.  Oh, and this also finishes my conversion to Avery Brooks fandom; his performance in this episode is simply colossal.

These later seasons are also stronger in secondary arcs that take several episodes: Quark/Rom's mother's stories, Eddington's and Dukat's plots and tragedies in war and life, Worf's many family issues.  BTW, I remember a previous discussion about Worf's appearance in DS9 which apparently not every Niner likes, but now I can't understand this. Even in the first seasons, Worf was a good hook into the critical participation the Klingon Empire would come to have in the Dominion Wars; besides that, later episodes finally add depth to the character, and yes his relationship with Jadzia Dax was perfect for that (and perfect for her character too).

Overall, it's clear that DS9 was still a "transitional" show, sitting between classic episodic shows and modern series with strong core story that extends for the entire show, at most split into "chapters" per season, like very long miniseries (think BrBa, HoC etc.). I'd love to see a future Trek series to fully embrace the latter model, which IMO is the only option in the age of Internet streaming and binge-watching: I just can't imagine myself tolerating the old way of watching a new episode per week or two. (In fact I always hated that, it's the reason why I didn't watch shows like DS9 when they were on TV, remarkably before DVR was a thing.)

I've also noticed another unique quality of DS9: It's the only Trek series that works effectively with suffering and loss. This starts already with Sisko's loss of his wife in the opening episode; but while this kind of plot element is common as a background, real tragedy never happens as part of the main storytelling. Single exception in TOS goes to The City on the Edge of Forever in TV, and The Wrath Of Khan among the movies: no coincidence that these are often listed as the best TOS episode and the best TOS movie!  Also in TNG, we have a few episodes with that quality too (all "Picard episodes").  But DS9 makes it the norm: we see deaths that have important consequences and emotional impact; stories with tragic endings and no "feel-good" upside at all; characters subject to the kind of suffering that changes them (e.g. S4E18 Hard Time).  Suspense is much stronger because you eventually learn that almost anything can happen, the writers aren't over-protective of the main crew, bad luck is not only for secondary or expendable characters.
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+Benjamin Leffler I just watched a few more episodes, finished In The Pale Moonlight. :) It's episodes like this that finally won me to DS9, and in particular to Sisko as the best Captain. In an emotional level I still love and prefer Kirk and Picard for their charisma or, in the case of Picard, his idealized embodiment of Starfleet values. But really if you consider realism and depth, Sisko is what you'd expect from a Captain: a strong strategist, and a leader that is often forced to make hard decisions, and does make them instead of getting away with heroic ways that always work against any odds.
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Software Engineer, Google Ad Exchange
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  • Google
    Software Engineer, 2012 - present
    Making RTB easy!
  • ThinkBRQ
    Consultant at Citi, NYSE, 2010 - 2011
    First gigs in the US, financial services.
  • Visionnaire
    Software Architect, 1997 - 2010
    Tons of stuff... thanks for all the fish.
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Nutley, NJ
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Curitiba, Brazil - Nantes, FR - Cruz Alta, Brazil
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Software engineer at Google. Husband, Father. Stereotypical geek who loves sci-fi, etc. Powerlifter without much power, can bench-press eight TAOCP collections!
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I am a Googler but this is a personal account, the opinions expressed here represent my own and not necessarily those of my employer, past or present.
Education
  • École des Mines de Nantes, FR
    MSc Object Oriented Software Engineering, 1999 - 2000
  • PUC/PR, BR
    BSc Computer Science, 1992 - 1995
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I've taken my car to D&L for inspection last month, failed because I had had a recent battery discharge that wiped the OBD. But since they only found that by the end of the work, I had to pay for the full service. So after putting some miles in the car I took the car again for inspection, now it passed with flying colors and for my surprise the re-inspection was courtesy, I was only billed for the sticker. Fast and courteous service too.
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