Profile

Cover photo
Olof Johansson
Works at Google
Attended Luleå University of Technology
Lives in Belmont, CA
3,162 followers|1,988,079 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube
People
Have him in circles
3,162 people
Dan Smith's profile photo
owan mixage's profile photo
shubham Rajawat's profile photo
Rafael Wysocki's profile photo
Manish Jaggi's profile photo
Eric Chen's profile photo
Kenneth Johansson's profile photo
Pero Meditatić's profile photo
Armando Ferreira's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Google ChromeOS. Mostly linux kernel stuff.
Employment
  • Google
    2010 - present
  • Agnilux
    2009 - 2010
  • Apple
    2008 - 2009
  • PA Semi
    2005 - 2008
  • IBM
    2000 - 2005
  • Effnet
    1997 - 2000
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Belmont, CA
Previously
Austin, TX - Luleå, Sweden - Skellefteå, Sweden
Story
Tagline
Swede in California
Education
  • Luleå University of Technology
    1992 - 1998
  • Balderskolan
    1989 - 1992
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married

Stream

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
A friend posted this link on G+. This is the same friend who sent me a board to evaluate a while ago. An industrial board.

You don't work for long in the embedded field without working with, or at least hearing about, the iMX series. Robust, trustworthy, well designed... They are used extensively in industrial systems. Now they are about to appear on a 96Boards compliant board. An industrial-grade iMX without Ethernet? Read the article for more information. Well, this is my answer:

Dear makers of open standards,

I like you. I really do. And I also think that "open" standards are useful, no, required. I like it when boards can fit easily into cases, and I like it when everything just fits together. Who doesn't love the Arduino shield layout? Used originally on Arduino shields, I now use the format daily for mbed development, on ARM boards.

However. After having worked for years in industrial systems, please, please take into account the fact that Wi-Fi, ZigBee and other wireless standards DO NOT WORK in heavily EM-polluted environments. An 8kW welder will kill any wireless signal within a 50 metre radius, and that isn't the worst I've seen. Imagine everything going on at a car factory, do you really think that every station will be able to use Wi-Fi? The VW plant I visited in Sao Paulo can manufacture 4 or 5 models at the same time, the result from one station being sent to the next one. Different nuts and bolts aren't tightened to the same level depending on the model, so the tightening controllers need to have that information immediately, and reliably. Everything works great, and they are using Ethernet based protocols. Wires? Who cares! Every station has power rails, adding an Ethernet cable doesn't make much of a difference.

Besides, while wireless is awesome, Ethernet has one major advantage over wireless; PoE. For sensors and indeed for some calculators, Ethernet isn't going anywhere. Plug and play.

Yes, you could add Ethernet on a shield. No, we don't want that. We want Ethernet, right now, on the board, natively. We might want the shield for something else (hall effect sensors, proximity sensors, various high-speed I/O, and other devices that are used to keep us alive while a huge robot moves large metal blocks like they were polystyrene).

I like the idea of a standard, and yes, we use standards every single day. I can buy a PC mainboard and have it fit inside my tower, and that is awesome, and needed. This might be the same thing; just change any x, and it will fit into any y (replace x and y with board, shield, case, connector, etc.). We need this, but we really do need at least one Ethernet connector. Two would be nice (you'll notice that most industrial systems have two) but we can settle for one. We can't have boards with none. Sorry, we just can't. If this standard doesn't have Ethernet, we'll probably look for another standard, or just not use standards at all.

Please?

Thanks to +Anthony Harivel for the link and for the board! Looking forward to more, but with Ethernet connectors, like the first one.
96Boards is an open hardware platform specification for 32-bit and 64-bit processors boards (64+32 = 96), but so far only 64-bit board have been launched or announced, and 32-bit boards were missing from the equation. Freescale will soon change that as they've partnered with Arrow Electronics on ...
1 comment on original post
13
1
Matt Porter (mdp)'s profile photoOlof Johansson's profile photoDrew Fustini (pdp7)'s profile photo
2 comments
 
Sure, they're labelling their product line "consumer edition" anyway, not "industrial embedded". I do sort of wonder how many developers would prefer wired ethernet anyway, but maybe not quite so many.

Ah well, interesting times ahead.
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
SolidRun's new carrier for the i.MX6 module looks to have a quite nice feature set. i.MX6 is getting a bit dated but it's still holding up fairly well.

Prices seem to be in the $110-$250 range depending on configuration. 
6
Andrew Bradford (bradfa)'s profile photoThomas Petazzoni's profile photoBenoit Chesneau's profile photoPeter Robinson's profile photo
5 comments
 
I'd love a refreshed Cubox-i 4x4 with the Quad Plus SoC
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
I'm quite skeptical to the utility of running mainline kernels on consumer devices (compared to laptops/desktops/"computers"). Still, this is cool.
 
Achievement unlocked (Xperia Z3 + mainline + a few patches). Now we need to get those patches merged.
12 comments on original post
13
1
Bjorn Andersson's profile photoLewin Edwards's profile photoJohn Stultz's profile photoIbrahim Ng'eno's profile photo
4 comments
 
For me, the utility is about getting upstream developers to care. I really doubt we'll have any sort of healthy upstream community interest in mobile issues until upstream developers can run their kernels on their own devices.
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
In-flight optical experiments. Custom brew from Mikkeller for SAS.
19
1
Christopher Friedt's profile photoHeiko Stübner's profile photoPhilipp Raich's profile photoNikolay Nikolaev's profile photo
3 comments
 
Mhmmm Mikkeler… I could live with that
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Wheee! I didn't know it's out.

I've been dogfooding a pre-production unit of this thing for the past few months and I really love it.

This thing is literally featherweight and I can still remember the astonishment I felt when I first received it from the dogfood program. The dogfood program person handed it (naked without a box) to me. My hands moved up an inch and half immediately after he let it go, because the brain connected to them was expecting it to be a lot heavier. I said, "Wow this thing is light". He grinned.

The screen, even though it is the same size as Nexus 10 tablet, has enough resolution (1280x800) for me to open two 80x54 terminals side by side (it can even go to 1440x900 but I use it at the "best" 1280x800 resolution).

Even though it "flips" to become a tablet, I almost never use it that way. But being able to turn the screen completely flat has another use. Sitting back, keeping the near-side edge on my knees and turning the screen flat, it raises the screen at about the right height in front of my eyes, making it a very easy-to-use reading device.

I plug it before I go to bed, unplug it and throw it in a bag in the morning, use it on the bus while commuting both ways, do my evening hacking and reading, and by the end of the day the bettery has plenty of juice left.

It may not be for everybody. Those with larger hands wouldn't be comfortable (oh, those who cannot live with a Chromebook are not its audience, but that goes without saying).

There are one and a half things I am unhappy about the unit.  A half is that when its lid is kept closed, the keytops touch the display, leaving faint but noticeable marks. I do not know if they fixed it in the production unit. The other one is that it does not draw power from USB-C but from its own AC adapter. But both are minor.

Now it is out, I'll eventually be asked to return the unit back to the dogfooding office. I am not looking forward to that day.
18 comments on original post
8
Luigi Semenzato's profile photoBehan Webster's profile photoXorA's profile photo
5 comments
XorA
 
Stack of these for sale at Linaro Connect??? :-D
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
3,162 people
Dan Smith's profile photo
owan mixage's profile photo
shubham Rajawat's profile photo
Rafael Wysocki's profile photo
Manish Jaggi's profile photo
Eric Chen's profile photo
Kenneth Johansson's profile photo
Pero Meditatić's profile photo
Armando Ferreira's profile photo

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Is that yet another proprietary uart connector I see on the top left? That'd be unfortunate, and a pretty strong signal that something's missing in the spec?

I am somewhat excited about that non-standard micro-b connector by the power though. 5V in? Please, please please.
 
Another 96Boards, and If I remember correctly, the first 32-bit board compliant with the specs.
96Boards is an open hardware platform specification for 32-bit and 64-bit ARM processors boards (64+32 = 96), but so far only 64-bit board have been launched or announced, and 32-bit boards were missing from the equation. Freescale will soon change that as they've partnered with Arrow ...
1 comment on original post
3
Lewin Edwards's profile photoMåns Rullgård's profile photoOlof Johansson's profile photo
8 comments
 
Måns: are you referring to the JTAG connector or 96Boards as a concept? The comic applies to both. :)
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
#opticalexperiments by the new fire pit.
23
Vladimir Pantelic's profile photoStan Gosnell's profile photoDrew Fustini (pdp7)'s profile photoDarren Hart's profile photo
6 comments
 
I want to go to there.
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
I misread as GPUs that come from ARM, and nearly fell of my chair in excitement.

But nope, it's the same platforms that people had already started enabling that are touched here. Still, good progress on those!
 
Happy to see commits about 3 GPUs that run on ARM machines in today's Mesa gitlog.
Age, Commit message (Expand), Author, Files, Lines. 7 hours, nvc0/ir: trim out barrier sync for non-compute shadersHEADmaster, Ilia Mirkin, 1, -0/+6. 7 hours, nvc0/ir: fix barrier emission, Ilia Mirkin, 1, -0/+2. 8 hours, vc4: Add support for ARB_draw_elements_base_vertex. Eric Anholt, 1, -1/+3 ...
3 comments on original post
8
Tomeu Vizoso's profile photo
 
You are such an optimist :)
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Nice deal for the 4GB Chromebook Flip.
6
1
Olof Johansson's profile photoHeiko Stübner's profile photoLeeep ster's profile photoMarcus Franz's profile photo
6 comments
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Project of the day.

Brisket on the smoker, so what better project than playing with a 433.920 receiver, Arduino and ESP8266 to be able to monitor the wireless BBQ thermometer away from the house?
17
David Anders (prpplague)'s profile photoLewin Edwards's profile photoOlof Johansson's profile photoMatt Porter (mdp)'s profile photo
5 comments
Add a comment...

Olof Johansson

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wow, +SAS now has Wifi on the cross-atlantic flights. Sitting here merging pull requests at 25000 ft.
10
Olof Johansson's profile photoIvar Holmqvist's profile photoVadim Bendebury's profile photoGeert Uytterhoeven's profile photo
6 comments
 
+Vadim Bendebury Don't they use satellite uplinks? The higher, the better ;-)
Add a comment...
Olof's Collections