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Olof Johansson
Works at Google
Attended Luleå University of Technology
Lives in Belmont, CA
3,207 followers|2,205,112 views
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Work
Occupation
Google ChromeOS. Mostly linux kernel stuff.
Employment
  • Google
    2010 - present
  • Agnilux
    2009 - 2010
  • Apple
    2008 - 2009
  • PA Semi
    2005 - 2008
  • IBM
    2000 - 2005
  • Effnet
    1997 - 2000
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Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Belmont, CA
Previously
Austin, TX - Luleå, Sweden - Skellefteå, Sweden
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Swede in California
Education
  • Luleå University of Technology
    1992 - 1998
  • Balderskolan
    1989 - 1992
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Male
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Olof Johansson

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Now, I wonder if the author also mounted a huge wing on the back?

In all seriousness, this is a cool project though. The choice of distro isn't really important here, but running a different stack on the in-vehicle entertainment system is neat. Not very practical though.

I wonder how long until there's a Cyanogen-style stack for it. I'm not sure I'd be brave enough to run it and possibly void the warranty of a $100k car myself. I'll stick to doing my software experiments on $250 Chromebooks for now.
After 2 weeks of cross-compiling, struggling with ALSA, and fighting with Xorg and Nvidia Tegra drivers, I finally have something I would consider presentable! The car would make an amazing media center. Holy crap it ...
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It's just a tegra3, so it should be "fairly easy" to get a cyanogen stack for it. Or at least it would be easier if Tesla would actually follow the licensing of the code that they use. But good on them making a huge profit off GPL software. 
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Olof Johansson

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Well deserved after a long couple of weeks!
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People are claiming that BMW is complying with the GPL, but just providing sources is not always sufficient for that (for GPLv3 at least).

Still, good to see progress here! 3.0.21 from Qualcomm. Potentially scary stuff w.r.t. staleness and known bugs.
 
BMW are complying with the GPL
The good news follow-up rarely gets as much attention as the original bad-news story. Earlier this month I accidentally kicked off a minor kerfuffle over whether BMW was respecting the GPL. Their i…
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Automotive is just one of many industries being very very careful to not ship GPLv3.
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Olof Johansson

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TIL about reddit.com/r/LaserCleaningPorn too.

These look like a lot of fun. Too bad they are insanely expensive.
 
If you’ve worked with steel or iron, you will be very familiar with rust. You will have an impressive armoury of wire brushes and chemicals to deal with it, and your sandblasting guy is probably in your speed-dial list. We’ve had more than one Hackaday…
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Awesome! First thought - wow! A real light sabre!
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Olof Johansson

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Something I was particularly proud of being able to demo last week at Linaro Connect, was the Nexus7 running a mainline kernel, which has been part of our form-factor enablement effort.

So here is a little demo video of the current status:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2zT38Egh-1TdFRybUZsSUY4bEU/view?usp=sharing

We've got Android Marshmallow running on a mainline kernel with ~50 patches on top of mainline:
https://git.linaro.org/people/john.stultz/flo.git/shortlog/refs/heads/flo-WIP

We've got accelerated graphics using freedreno and the latest mesa, with a DRM based hwcomposer.

This is really great, because we now have a very-close to mainline test bed on a actual consumer device. So we can make sure upstream doesn't introduce any regressions (just recently, two ABI breaks that affected android were recently caught) and allows us to make sure when we push Android functionality upstream, that any interface changes required by maintainers can be properly tested to make sure what lands upstream really works.

Again, I've not done much actual development to make this happen. I've just been doing integration work. So a huge thanks to +Rob Clark, +Bjorn Andersson, +Vinay Simha, +Archit Taneja, +Rob Herring, +Amit Pundir +Srinivas Kandagatla, and everyone who has been pushing related patches upstream at Qualcomm, Sony and Linaro's landing teams.

Its a huge credit to those folks that for the most part enabling functionality on this device has just been a matter of adding config options and devicetree entries. Of the ~50 patches, half are for the iommu and rpm-clk support for the device, ~10% is the display panel, and the rest are really config and device-tree changes, and a few small hacks to integrate into Android builds and getting the touch panel working.

If you want to try to reproduce this yourself, you can find instructions here (though no promises this won't set your device on fire):
https://wiki.linaro.org/LMG/Kernel/FormFactorEnablement

Performance Tracers (debug users only). 24.057 Start Interceptor/action chain 4 24.061 Start | [AfterLockServiceFilter] Before 15 24.076 Done 15 ms | [AfterLockServiceFilter] Before 0 24.076 Start | Interceptors (before) 0 24.076 Start | | InviteTokenInterceptor 35 24.111 Done 35 ms ...
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Olof Johansson

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I'm speechless.
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Pitch or Hack??? Wow.
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Olof Johansson

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More progress with upstream on Nexus 7. Looking forward to a shrinking patchset over time!
 
(If you've seen this twice, forgive the repost. I didn't intend to initially share it privately)

+Bjorn Andersson is a wizard who is somehow putting together the numerous and complicated prereqs for the wcn36xx driver so it will work on the apq8064 (which is what the 2013 Nexus7 uses). Never have I been so baffled by all the various parts required to get a wifi driver going. He's explained it three or four times and I still probably couldn't draw you all the parts involved.

But hey.. here it is.. actually working!

Well.. I still have some android userspace work to do. It currently only likes ipv6 sites, and ipv4 addresses won't route for reasons unknown. And getting the wifi up is a bit of a manual ordeal for now.

But slowly this is getting close to something I'll be able to sit on the couch and use!

So with my 4.6-rc2 tree, previously it was ~50 patches. With Bjorn's wifi code all merged in its closer to ~100. As I said, its a really complicated wifi driver. Many many thanks to +Bjorn Andersson / +Bjorn Andersson (too many g+ accounts out there), Pontus Fuchs, and other contributors for getting this all working!

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It's running Android AOSP on an upstream kernel, using public graphics pieces in particular.
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Olof Johansson

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POWER9 looks really interesting. Power is still my favourite architecture, and I'm happy to see it not going the way of the mainframes.
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And on Power systems there is no Backdoor in you Chip, might be a big Bonus to know that it's actually your system.
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Olof Johansson

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ELC conflicts with my kids' spring break this year, so I won't make it to the whole conference.

However, I'll be there one day: Monday (arriving Sunday night). I might be there in time to grab a beer on Sunday, so definitely find me on Monday in case you have something to discuss in person.
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Same for me. And due to additional distance (not to mention the closed BRU airport), I'll miss the single day, too ;-)
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Olof Johansson

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Netdev 1.1 - Measuring wifi performance across all Google Fiber customers (Avery Pennarun)
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I hate doing this. We work with a handful of devices but they span ancient omap to latest generation iDevice. It's weird and hurtful to expose the throughput we see on the various different phones, on the same WLAN :/
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Olof Johansson

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Tim Cook's high school is switching from MacBooks and iPads to Chromebooks. 

"The reason for the switch came down to simple economics: according to the school, Chromebooks cost roughly three-quarters less than MacBooks. (An N21 Chromebook, a model reportedly under consideration by the district, will set you back about $200; a MacBook is closer to the thousand-dollar range.) To complete the burn cycle, the district will sell its used MacBooks to pay for its new Chromebooks."
Tim Cook is a graduate of Robertsdale High School in Robertsdale, Alabama. Until last month, it and other schools in the area provided MacBooks for teachers and students in grades three through 12; younger kids were given iPads. Recently, however, the district decided to stop giving its students the merchandise of its most famous alumna. It plans to replace them with Lenovo Chromebooks.
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I believe I did, and was pretty disappointed. Would need to try again to provide meaningful feedback though.
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