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This Friday's Feature is Luray Cemetery. The town of Luray was laid out by Adam Sane and Richard Porter in 1832. At the time, the community was bustling with activity from the nearby Ohio Canal and the National Road. But by 1881, not much was left of the town.

Undoubtedly, many of the fine pioneers that made Luray grow and prosper are buried within its cemetery, but the resting place is in disrepair. A few veteran's markers commemorate our nation's heroes; a Confederate soldier as well as a World War II soldier are buried in the cemetery. According to records, the oldest tombstone belongs to Abraham Keller, who died in 1811.
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North Robinson Consolidated School is this Friday's feature! More recently known as the Colonel Crawford Intermediate School, the building was constructed in 1921 when several school districts merged to create a consolidated school. A two-story wing was added to the building around the same time that a new high school was built. The building continued to serve as an intermediate school until 200, when a new building was opened.

The school seemed to be in decent shape when we visited, though there was some water damage and busted windows. The first floor was being used as storage. The most interesting thing being stored was a dismantled log cabin that was set to be reconstructed nearby and used as an educational tool. 

Several people mentioned that the school was haunted. We recorded audio the entire time we were in the building, but we found nothing unusual on playback. The building was slated for demolition when we visited, but specifics were not known at the time.
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Our 2005 visit to the Broadwin Apartments in Columbus has been added to the website. The Broadwin was built in 1925, serving as a luxury apartment building for those who wanted a fashionable East Broad Street address without the hassles of owning property. There have been plans to renovate the building for the past 14 years, but none of those plans have come to fruition so far.
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The Toledo House of Corrections (also known as the Toledo Workhouse) is this Friday's feature. The City of Toledo purchased the farm site in May 1917 so that prisoners could serve time for their misdemeanor crimes while learning how to grow crops, raise cattle and hogs, and quarry limestone. The main workhouse was built a year later while other outbuildings, including a massive 20,873 square-foot barn, were built in the late 1920s.

By the mid-1960s, conditions at the workhouse had become so poor that eighty prisoners started a riot. The prisoners complained of being served vegetables that weren't properly cleaned (some with worms), rusty silverwear, and lack of access to proper medical care,among other things. The residing superintendent was relieved of his duties and a new superintendent was hired to correct the issues.

The workhouse fell on hard times again in the mid-1980s, just as talks were underway to expand the site as a regional jail. Substantial repairs and renovations were needed to bring the building up-to-date. It was ultimately decided that a new jail would be constructed and the workhouse would be permanently closed in 1991. 

The property was purchased by the Metroparks of Toledo in 2001 and renamed Blue Creek Conservation Area. The ultimate fate of the old workhouse is yet to be determined, but given the hazards of the site and the cost of cleaning it up, the building will likely fall to the wrecking ball.
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Matt Stilwell's profile photoJason Weitzel's profile photo
 
This is a pretty neat place with an interesting history.  Thanks for sharing.
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Licking County's York Street Cemetery is this Friday's featured page. Although the cemetery was founded in the 1860s, most of the burials have taken place throughout the 1900s. At least two burials related to gunfire are interred at the cemetery. One, Elmer Artz, a 19-year-old farmhand who committed suicide after assaulting two sisters and fatally shooting a neighbor, had to be guarded for several weeks after Columbus medical colleges wanted his body for research purposes.

Visit the link to read more about this case and for a complete list of standing tombstones at the time of our 2007 visit.
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The OES is now on Twitter. Follow us @OhioExploration.
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Ohio Exploration Society's profile photoJason Weitzel's profile photo
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Thanks +Jason Weitzel!  We'll have to check it out sometime.
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This Friday's feature is Franklinton Cemetery. Established in 1799, Franklinton Cemetery is believed to be the oldest burying ground in Central Ohio. Described as a beautiful graveyard nestled in a locust grove with a board fence in the early-to-mid 1800s, the site also marks the location of the first church in Central Ohio, built in 1811. The church building has been gone for quite some time, however.

Franklinton Cemetery was largely abandoned by the 1870s. Most of the burials were dug up and moved to the newer, larger Green Lawn Cemetery, including the body of Franklinton's founder Lucas Sullivant.

There are at least 114 burials remaining in the cemetery today, although many are unmarked. Veterans of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and the Civil War are buried in Franklinton Cemetery, along with the town's first minister, Seth Noble.
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The OES website has been updated, the first update of 2014! Added today are Ranger Station Mound (Vinton County) and Hill Cemetery (Delaware County). New hauntings and legends have been added to Butler, Delaware, Montgomery, Noble, Preble, and Summit counties. Check the link for details.
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The Ohio Exploration Society was featured in this article about our upcoming visit to the Clarence E. Miller building in Lancaster. The facility was built as the county poorhouse and infirmary. It served that purpose until the 1980s. The county health department later acquired the property and vacated it in November for a newer facility. Sections of the building date as far back as 1840.
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McKenzie & Snyder LLP.'s profile photoDevin Lumpuy's profile photo
 
Wonder what they'll find? There is paranormal activity at our office in Hamilton, OH. http://www.mckenzie-snyder.com/blog/haunted-houses-cast-spooky-shadow-over-hamilton-oh
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This Friday's feature is Coshocton House. We do not know much history about this dilapidated house located along a dirt road in a wooded area outside of Coshocton. Our observations lead us to believe it was built in the early 1900s. 

Much of the house had collapsed and bullet holes riddled the exterior walls. We have been told that hunters used the abandoned home for shelter for a number of years. The ground around the house was littered with old bottles and pieces of machinery. Please comment or email us if you recognize this property and can provide more information.
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Exploring Ohio's Forgotten & Historical Sites
Introduction
Founded in the summer of 2000, the OES is a group of urban explorers who visit both well-known historical locations and those forgotten with time. Members of the Ohio Exploration Society research and photograph locations that include everything from abandoned buildings to rural cemeteries to ancient Indian mounds to wonders of nature. We publish our research and photos on our website in an attempt to preserve the history and memory of these important sites.

In addition to documenting Ohio's forgotten and historical sites, the OES offers paranormal investigations. Our core paranormal team has many years of experience investigating paranormal claims. Unlike some paranormal groups who emulate what they have seen on television shows, the OES and our partners have developed our own investigative techniques. Our team focuses on physical research by using video recorders, digital cameras, audio recorders and other electronic equipment combined with historical research to document paranormal events. We also use intuitive research in some investigations.
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P.O. Box 972 Pickerington, OH 43147