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OC Dental Center
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Some sugar-free drinks can diminish oral health
Sporting a sugar-free label does not make a product tooth-friendly, warn oral health experts who urge consumers to be aware of the potential for sugar-free beverages and confectionery to be as damaging as those containing sugar.

Researchers at the Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre (CRC), based at the University of Melbourne, Australia, tested 23 different types of sugar-free drinks – including soft drinks and sports drinks – and found those that contain acidic additives and those with low pH levels cause measurable damage to tooth enamel, even if they have no sugar.

While most people are probably aware of the link between sugar and tooth decay, what is perhaps less well understood is the nature of that link, and why drinks that are acidic – whether they contain sugar or not – can also be bad for our teeth.

Sugar is linked to tooth decay because it forms a plaque on the tooth surface that bacteria digest and convert to acid. It is the acid that attacks teeth by dissolving the outer layers of tooth enamel. Thus, drinks that are acidic – whether they contain sugar or not – can also erode teeth.

‘A measurable loss of tooth enamel’
Oral health experts generally agree that the use of sugar substitutes – including, for example, xylitol, sorbitol and mannitol – in confectionery and beverages has helped to reduce tooth decay in children in industrialized countries.

However, in their newly released briefing paper, Prof. Reynolds and colleagues note that “consumers should be aware that many sugar-free products remain potentially harmful to teeth due to their chemical composition.”

The paper summarizes studies in the Oral Health CRC that measured dental enamel softening and tooth surface loss following exposure to a range of drinks.

The studies found that the majority of soft drinks and sports drinks led to softening of dental enamel by between a third and a half.
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Effects of Secondhand Smoke on your Teeth
Smoking isn’t exciting and alluring. In fact, the wicked vice is the reason of preventable mortality in the US. Smoking has been accounted for just about 438,000 deaths yearly. Non smokers are also at risk of issues due to secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke, according to Santa Ana Dentists, has been the major cause of lung cancer and the noxious fumes it produces can lead to dental problems in innocent bystanders.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published that 45 million of Americans smoke and this leads to dental problems of over 126 million non-smoking Americans. Spontaneous smokers which range from newborn little ones to senior citizens commonly get their harmful smoke fix from being exposed in cars, homes, workplaces as well as public places. In spite of how the flow of fumes penetrates non-smokers, the nicotine and carcinogens will enhance the chances of kids developing tooth decay, so if parents who smoke kiss their kids, they will pass on the nicotine.
Periodontal illness is a disease kicked off by germ filled dental plaque sticking to the gums, teeth as well as sneaking under the line of the gum. Gingivitis is the earliest stage and when left untreated, it could develop into periodontics. Regardless of how advanced the case is, both can develop to gum disease. In due course, the illness will add to dental issues like bleeding gums, abscesses and tooth loss.
The smoker is at risk for having dental issues because tobacco interferes with the job of health gum. Thus, gums could separate from your bone making your teeth susceptible to infection. In case you are suffering from this condition, it is advised to visit dentist near you.
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ADA releases first set of practice management guidelines
The ADA has released its first set of practice management guidelines, a new member value for dentists.
Managing Patients is the first module in the Guidelines for Practice Success, which will eventually include a series of practice management modules developed by the ADA Council on Dental Practice.
The ethically-based guidelines include information on how dentists can improve their patients’ experiences along with tips on managing the administrative and business side of their practices. Topics range from patient intake, where dentists can learn how to handle a patient’s first visit and tips on designing a reception area and decorating an office, to how to create cancellation policies and handle specialty referrals. The Managing Patients module also covers treatment recommendations and patient relations.
Future modules will include Managing Finances; Managing the Dental Team; Managing Marketing; Managing the Regulatory Environment; and Managing Technology.

Brought to you by OCDentalCenter.com, Santa Ana.
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Is cheese good for you?
Cheese tends to be a standard accompaniment to popular foods like burgers, pizza, Mexican dishes, salad and sandwiches but can also stand-alone as a snack or an appetizer.
The amount of cheese being consumed in the US has tripled over the past 40 years but is still only half that of European nations like Greece, France and Germany.
Whether cheese is a healthy choice depends on the individual, the type and amount of cheese being consumed. There are some cheeses that are high in protein and calcium, but there are just as many loaded with sodium and saturated fats.
For someone with a milk allergy, any type of cheese would be off limits. Lactose intolerant individuals may be able to tolerate some types of cheese depending on their level of intolerance.
Vegans or other people avoiding animal products for personal or health reasons would not consume cheese at all and would likely opt for a non-dairy alternative such as soy cheese or daiya.

Brought to you by OCDentalCenter.com, Santa Ana.
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OC Dental Center is an expert dental care center for dental implants. We offer professional implant service at our conveniently located clinic in Santa Ana, Orange County.
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How to eliminate pain tied to tooth decay
Dual discoveries at USC propose a promising method to regrow nonliving hard tissue, lessening or even eliminating pain associated with tooth decay, which the National Institutes of Health calls the most prevalent chronic disease.
Janet Moradian-Oldak, a professor at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC, has investigated methods to regrow tooth enamel for the past two decades. The process is especially tricky because unlike bone, mature enamel cannot rejuvenate. Tooth enamel is a nonliving tissue.
The a-ha moment came Oct. 22 when, in collaboration with lead author Sauma Prajapati of USC and other colleagues, she published a study in the Biomaterials journal saying matrix metalloproteinase-20, an enzyme found only in teeth, chops up amelogenin proteins, which facilitate organized enamel crystal formation. MMP-20 clears the way for hard material to usurp vacated space.
Her team is the first to define the function of an enzyme for preventing protein occlusion inside a crystal.
Brought to you by OC Dental Center, Santa Ana: www.ocdentalcenter.com http://ow.ly/UUM5K
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