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Objekt.Inc
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We create brand, manage Interior Design, Product Design, Furniture Design, Graphic Design
We create brand, manage Interior Design, Product Design, Furniture Design, Graphic Design

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Merry Christmas and may you live a long and happy life filled with goodwill and friendship. And all the best in the New Year!
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China is building the world’s first migratory ‘Bird Airport’

Modern architecture has often been accused of encroaching on wildlife habitats – but McGregor Coxall just unveiled a new project that’s literally for the birds. The world’s first migratory “Bird Airport” is designed to convert a landfill in Lingang, China into a wetland bird sanctuary

Every year, more than 50 million birds journey from the Antarctic along the East Asian-Australian Flyway (EAAF), but the route is increasingly threatened to due to coastal urbanization. Today, 1 in 5 globally endangered waterbirds fly this route as their population rapidly decreases.

To address the problem, the Port of Tianjin called on international designers to create a wetland sanctuary for migrating birds. McGregor Coxall’s Bird Airport includes 60 hectares of wetland park, where birds will be able to stop, refuel, and breed on their way through the flyway. Renewable energy will be used to irrigate the wetlands with recycled waste water and harvested rain.

Adrian McGregor, CEO and lead designer of McGregor Coxall explains the inspiration behind the project, “The earth’s bird flyways are a wonder of the natural world. The proposed Bird Airport will be a globally significant sanctuary for endangered migratory bird species whilst providing new green lungs for the city of Tianjin.”

The city of Tianjin will enjoy many benefits from the new green infrastructure. The proposal calls for plenty of park space – including walking and cycling paths along a 7 km network of recreational urban forest trails. Construction on the bird airport is slated to begin late 2017, and the project will be completed in 2018.
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17. 3. 24.
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Spectacular new shipping container museum nestles near China’s Great Wall

Nestled near China’s famous Great Wall rests a new cultural museum made with shipping containers. The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum designed by IAPA Design Consultants offers an opportunity to learn while appreciating glorious scenery. Locally sourced and recycled materials add to the peaceful museum’s sustainability.

IAPA worked with The Mother Earth Happiness Group to design the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum in Beijing, China. The design statement said the architects emphasized art culture and environmental protection in their vision for the sleek center that includes offices and exhibit areas wrapped in patios, courtyards, and gardens. Trees and hills of the encircling Great Wall historic site root the museum in nature.

The Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a place to relax; visitors can soak in the scenery via a roof garden, viewing platform, viewing tower, or from the bridges connecting the shipping container buildings. They can wander about the museum, dine in a restaurant, or seek refreshment in a teahouse. According to the design statement, “Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum is a representation of the continuity of traditional cultural heritage.”

IAPA’s goal as stated on their website is to use “modern design techniques to interpret traditional oriental philosophy.” It appears they accomplished that goal elegantly in the Zhao Hua Xi Shi Living Museum.
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16. 12. 30.
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Foster + Partners breaks ground on Ferring Pharamceuticals’ headquarters in Copenhagen

Foster + Partners just kicked off construction on Ferring Pharamceuticals’ new light-filled headquarters in Copenhagen. Surrounded on all sides by water, the 39,000-square-meter office building takes advantage of its waterfront position with a glass envelope that captures surrounding views and natural daylight. The visually striking building is built like an inverted pyramid and the generous use of glass gives the structure a floating appearance that contrasts with the heavy plinth on which it sits.

Located near the Copenhagen International airport in the city’s Kastrup area, Ferring Pharamceuticals’ new country headquarters design is strongly informed by its surrounding urban landscape. Since the site is flanked by predominately low-rise development, the architects designed the building facade with a strong horizontal emphasis and clad the structure almost entirely in glass to take advantage of views. The headquarters’ triangular form was dictated by the shape of the waterfront site and is set atop a large stone plinth that protects the building from flooding.

Six glazed floors and a cantilevered roof canopy are stacked atop the plinth and are arranged in such a way to create self-shaded spaces on each floor. A large atrium punctuates the heart of the building and comprises the entrance lobby, cafe, breakout spaces, conference facility, and other social, collaborative spaces. The areas for quiet individual work, such as the offices and laboratories, are tucked away at the edges. The workspace layout was determined by in-depth studies of the company’s work culture. Daylight streams in to illuminate the workplaces from all sides.

Related: Foster + Partners’ Droneport will launch aerial vehicles to deliver medical supplies in Africa

“We wanted to create a very strong base that directly connects to and celebrates this unique waterside location and lifts the building above that level – so that there are uninterrupted views from the ground floor to the strait and the surrounding harbour,” said Grant Brooker, who led the building design. “For such a significant project it was vital that the building reflected the personality of the organisation and that it would create a collaborative and flexible working environment to carry them through the next century.”
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2016-09-06
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New LEGO headquarters in Denmark modeled after its famous toy bricks

LEGO Group plans to add a new headquarters in Denmark, and the global hub will be designed by architect C.F. Møller, also from Denmark. The building itself will be home to a collaborative work (and play) space, according to the company’s mission, while the exterior grounds will consist of a park open to the public. With influence taken straight from the famous toy bricks, Møller’s design will include a LEGO People House, a colorful atrium, and architectural features built right on top of recognizable LEGO elements.

The new office complex will be located in Billund, Denmark and will serve as a hub for the company’s global headquarters. To create the design, the architect will take cues from LEGO employees who contributed their input en masse, and the resulting office space will represent the two major aims of the toymaker: work and play. The LEGO People House is an informal space, where employees and visitors “can be physically active and socialize, both during and outside working hours,” according to Claus Flyger Pejstrup, Senior Vice President at the LEGO Group, and responsible for the LEGO Group Headquarters in Denmark.

The LEGO Group employs more than 17,000 people around the world, of which more than 4,000 LEGO® employees of 35 nationalities work in Denmark, spanning product development, marketing, manufacturing, engineering, quality and various other functions. The new building will be the company’s main hub in Billund, spanning 52,000 square meters, and will incorporate energy efficiency features as well as numerous green spaces.

“We want a distinct office building that clearly conveys the LEGO values, and which truly expresses the creative, innovative culture of our company,” said Pejstrup. “I am very excited that we can now present our vision for this new building, both to our employees and to the community.”
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2016-07-11
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Beautiful prismatic glass panels envelop SOM’s Beijing Greenland Center

The 55-story Beijing Greenland Center, clad in a striking glass facade, was recently completed in the city's Dawangjing district. The mixed-use tower, designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill , has an intricate patterned facade made of low-E glass panels that mimic the bas relief carving technique and help maintain stable indoor temperatures. The building is super efficient thanks to a heat-reclaim wheel, efficient evaporative cooling and its shade providing skin.

The 260-meter tower is enveloped in curtain walls made of glass panels arranged in a prism-like manner. The high-performance skin captures and refracts daylight, creating an interesting interplay of light and shadow. The isosceles trapezoidal modules taper down and up in an alternating pattern on all sides of the building.

The thermally efficient skin is only one among the building’s many sustainable features. Variable speed pumps were incorporated to optimize heating and cooling, while a water-side economizer helps utilize evaporative cooling.

“Addressing a need for environmentally responsible, mixed-use urban development, Beijing Greenland Center is a highly visible example of how visually striking design can also be highly flexible and sustainable,” said the architects.
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2016-06-22
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The completion of China’s latest glass bridge, the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Glass Bridge designed by Haim Dotan Architects, has been delayed, but thrill-seekers won’t mind the wait. Vice General Manager Joe Chen of the Zhangjiajie Canyon Tourism Management Co. confirmed to Inhabitat the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon Bridge will include not one swing, but three. He also hinted when the bridge could open.
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2016-05-25
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Bardessono Eco Hotel Awarded LEED Platinum Certification

Inhabitat previously covered the construction of the luxurious Bardessono Hotel in Napa Valley with its cornucopia of environmentally friendly measures — from automated thermostats and LED lighting to salvaged local materials and solar and geothermal renewable energy. Since then, Bardessono was awarded LEED Platinum Certification, the highest standard of environmental design. At the time, it was one of only three hotels in the world have achieved this certification.

On an interesting side note, Bardessono’s solar panels represent a real world compromise that even the most ambitious green building dreams are often subjected to. Approached by Bardessono, solar installer Premier Power initially designed a solar system with tilted rooftop panels for maximum energy output. However, rising material costs soon made the design unfeasible. Rather than scrapping solar altogether, Premier Power and Bardessono found a building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) solution that qualified for a 30% investment tax credit and allowed Bardessono to move forward.

The 200kw flat rooftop system supplies half the property’s total energy usage, offsetting 21,000 gallons of oil and preventing 400,000 pounds of greenhouse gas emissions each year. Other green features include an underground geothermal system for heating and cooling needs, low water use fixtures, energy efficient and natural lighting, sensor-equipped rooms to reduce unneeded energy use, and eco-friendly building materials salvaged from local wine operations.

The hotel’s daily operations are equally green and emphasize organic cleaning supplies, recycling, and composting programs, with carbon fiber bicycles available for guests to explore the property’s many on site-producing gardens. An expansive rooftop pool and on-site restaurant featuring local, farm-fresh ingredients affirm Bardessono’s status a unique luxury getaway, proving that neither comfort nor the environment need be sacrificed for one another.
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2016-04-23
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Game Time for Levi's Stadium
The Santa Clara, Calif., stadium designed by HNTB hosts its first Super Bowl—and the architecture team will be there to watch.

For fans of the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, this Super Bowl Sunday is about the football. But the game is also the Super Bowl debut for Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., a venue designed by HNTB. The 1.85 million-square-foot stadium opened in 2014 as the new home for the San Francisco 49ers. It's the first LEED Gold NFL stadium and has been tricked out with fast Wi-Fi and an app—not surprising for a Silicon Valley stadium.

"From the very beginning design-wise, this really became an expression of simple geometric forms and shapes," says Tim Cahill, FAIA, senior vice president and chief design officer at HNTB as well as the stadium project's chief design principal. "This was never meant to be a retro type of approach to stadium design or looking backwards towards an aesthetic. This was always meant to be a reflection of innovation and of what the Silicon Valley and San Francisco area is."

One of the teams playing on Sunday already has a familiarity with the work of HNTB. The firm also designed the Sports Authority Field at Mile High in Denver, the home stadium for the Broncos.

"We try and make each of the buildings that we do reflective of where they’re located," Cahill says. "So Broncos stadium, the brick materials are the colors of the Broncos and of the region. The upper bowl is kind of sinuous shape, which is reflective of the mountains, etc. The open ends on it, views of Pikes Peak—it’s about that location, it’s about that site. The same thing here in Santa Clara. The idea was to have an open-air structure, so it’s about views into the bowl, it’s about views outside to the surrounding areas as well. So each of these stadiums is, again, about the context and about the culture in which they sit."

At Sunday's game, where they'll be watching from the Levi’s 501 Club, Cahill and his colleagues Lanson Nichols and Wes Crosby will be rooting for the Broncos.

"They’re a client, but also long-term friends and I'm excited to see them there," says Nichols, HNTB vice president and principal project manager on the stadium. "When we were doing the project for Denver was when they won their back-to-back Super Bowls—was right before that opened. [Ed note: 1998 and 1999] So that was an exciting time, and it’s an exciting time to see them there again, and to be playing in another stadium that we designed."

Or, as Crosby, HNTB's director of design for interiors, puts it: "You can't root against your client."

Visit ARCHITECT's Project Gallery for more information and images about Levi's Stadium.
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2016-02-05
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PlanO's fun take on the traditional planner introduces a new way to organize your life and goals successfully. 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/211489875/plano-planner
PlanO Planner
PlanO Planner
vimeo.com
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