Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Nuts & Bolts Speed Training
138 followers -
PowerPoint Tips, Tricks & Tutorials for Business Professionals
PowerPoint Tips, Tricks & Tutorials for Business Professionals

138 followers
About
Posts

Post has attachment
Learn how to turn a photo into a sketch or line drawing in PowerPoint, without having to sketch it or draw it.

★ NEW POWERPOINT PICTURE COURSE SPECIAL OFFER
http://bit.ly/Full-Screen-Visuals-YT-Special

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

How to Turn a Picture into a Sketch Tutorial Description

The trick to turning your photos into sketches or line drawings in PowerPoint without having to sketch or draw them, is the Artistic Effects.

While you CAN move to another program like Photoshop to create this same drawing effect, why bother when you can natively do it in PowerPoint with the artistic effect options.

These are default PowerPoint options that automatically convert your photos into line drawings, sketches, chalk sketches and other cool effects that you can then adjust using the different transparency and pressure sizes to create whatever slide background effect you want.

In this PPT tutorial, you'll see how to turn a picture into the following types of sketches:

1. Marker sketch
2. Pencil Greyscale sketch
3. Pencil Sketch
4. Line Drawing sketch
5. Chalk sketch

On top of that, for the black and white sketches, you'll also see how to adjust the transparency level of the effect, allowing your underlying photo to bleed through the sketch or line drawing effect to add some color to your slide background picture.

This is another instance where a little bit of PowerPoint speed training can go a long way.

If you want to learn more about my new picture course for PowerPoint, turning non-full screen pictures into full screen visual images, check out the link below.

★ NEW POWERPOINT PICTURE COURSE SPECIAL OFFER
http://bit.ly/Full-Screen-Visuals-YT-Special
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Learn how to crop pictures in PowerPoint using the default image cropping tools to crop to shape and crop to perfect 4:3 and 16:9 resolutions.

★ NEW POWERPOINT PICTURE COURSE SPECIAL OFFER
http://bit.ly/Full-Screen-Visuals-YT-Special

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

Picture Cropping Tutorial Description

PowerPoint has A LOT of default image cropping tools (including what I call the image cropper command) to make cropping pictures in PowerPoint extremely fast and easy.

So easy in fact, that you’ll likely never need to use or learn Photoshop, as so many of the standard picture edits you need can instead be done faster, and more easily directly in PowerPoint.

You can even automatically crop your images perfectly to fit the 4:3 or 16:9 resolutions!

The picture cropping commands covered in this PowerPoint tutorial include:

The Crop Command – the basic feature that allows you to remove the pieces of your photo that you don’t want to present on your slide.

Crop Adjustment Commands – two different ways you can re-position your photo inside of the cropped areas of your photo (see tutorial for your options including the XY Offset commands).

Picture Reset Command – allowing you to uncrop your images back to the original picture you started with. This is EXTREMELY useful when you inherit someone else’s slides and you don’t like how they’ve cropped their images, allowing you to quickly and easily undo their edits and start over again (it happens all the time).

Crop to Shape Command – allowing you to crop a picture to a circle, triangle or other PowerPoint shape. From there you can re-position your photo within the cropped area.

The Intersect Command - allowing you to more quickly crop your images to a specifically sized PowerPoint shape like a circle, triangle or arrow.

Crop to Aspect Ratio (the image cropper command) – allowing you to automatically crop your photos to the 4:3 or 16:9 resolution slide sizes. That way you can just resize your photo to perfectly fit your entire slide, regardless of whether you are printing in the 4:3 resolution or presenting in the widescreen 16:9 resolution format.

The beauty of the image cropper command (as I call it) is PowerPoint automatically sets the correct 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratio frame, allowing you to then adjust what parts of your photo remain.

And as long as you have A LOT of negative space in your photo (sky, sand, or other general features), this cropping trick is the fastest and easiest way to create a full screen photo for your slide background.

That’s because it requires no additional picture editing. The downside is, as you are basically just resizing your photo, everything in your photo gets bigger (which is not always ideal).

To learn how I built out around the photos in this PowerPoint tutorial at the end (instead of cropping the images down) see my new picture editing course for PowerPoint below.

★ NEW POWERPOINT PICTURE COURSE SPECIAL OFFER
http://bit.ly/Full-Screen-Visuals-YT-Special
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
A watermark in PowerPoint is a text background that informs people that your presentation is either DRAFT or CONFIDENTIAL or TOP SCERET or PROJECT ALPHA or whatever.

The point of a watermark stamp is to inform your colleagues the status of your document, so that they don't for example, send the DRAFT presentation onto a client or colleague as final, or accidentally share a CONFIDENTAL file outside of your organization.

Whatever watermark you are adding to your slides in PowerPoint, the first questions you want to ask yourself before you start making it are:

1. Do you want your watermark on all of your PowerPoint slides, or just on a few of them?

2. Do you want your watermark to be editable in the normal view, or do you want it to be non-editable?

The reason these questions are important is they determine where you add the draft or confidential watermark within your presentation.

Assuming you want your draft or confidential stamp on all of your slides as a text background that is NOT editable, you want to add the watermark on your PowerPoint slide master.

If you just want your draft watermark on a single slide, simply add the watermark on the child slide layout within your slide master (see video for instructions).

If you want your draft watermark on all of your slides within you presentation, you'll want to add it to the Parent Slide (see video for instructions and demo).

Two methods for adding your watermark stamp are:

1. You can add the stamp using text, creating a text background
2. You can add the stamp using an image, creating an image background (in this case it will be draft picture instead of draft text)

Which ever method you choose, you want to make sure that your stamp is sent to the back of your slide, so that your draft or confidential watermark shows up behind everything else on your slide.

If you use a draft picture to create your stamp, I recommend using the picture tools to washout the picture, so that it actually looks like a draft stamp. If your image is too sharp, your stamp will be too distracting.

Remember, you are just trying to indicate the status of a document (draft, confidential, top secret, etc.) you are not trying to have the stamp or watermark, dominate your slide.

To see a step-by-step walkthrough of how to make a watermark in PowerPoint, see the training tutorial above where you'll additionally learn:
► How to make the slide background an image
► How to paste text as a picture
► How to change the slide background
► How to tile your background as a pattern
► How to get missing watermarks to appear
► How to push your watermark behind the content on your slide
► What to do if your watermark is hidden on certain slides

To learn more about how to create custom PowerPoint templates, including template design ideas, tips and resources, go to this article on our website: https://nutsandboltsspeedtraining.com/powerpoint-tutorials/create-powerpoint-template/

If you have any questions about adding a stamp or watermark in PowerPoint, let me know in the comment section below.

If you want to see some of our best free PowerPoint training that will save you 40 hours in PowerPoint this year, sign-up on the page below.
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Learn how to create a PowerPoint template, nailing down your custom slides and slide templates so that everyone can fill in your template correctly.

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE:
http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

In this third PowerPoint template tutorial series (part 3 of 3), you'll learn how to edit the Child Slide Master Layouts to create your own custom slides and slide templates that everyone can use.

This involves formatting the individual slide layouts to fit the needs of each type of slide you’ll be including in your presentation; as well as how to add custom layouts to your template for frequently used slide types, such as team bios, agendas, case studies, etc. You’ll also get some design ideas for creating title slides and main content slides.

The child slides in your slide master are the key to designing your own custom slides so that everyone can quickly fill them in when using your template.

Along the way, you’ll also learn:
- How to remove background graphics on the Slide Master so that they’re hidden on a child layout
- How to make the slide background an existing picture you your Slide Master
- Why you can’t edit the guides on a child layout
- How to draw in a perfectly straight line in PowerPoint, using the Shift key
- Why you want to keep your Parent Slide Master as bare as possible
- How to add new custom child layouts to your Slide Master
- How to rename your custom child layouts in your Slide Master
- Best practices for creating custom PowerPoint templates from scratch
- How to add prompt text to help the template user properly fill in each layout

This is the third of three parts to this PPT template training series. To learn more about how to make a professional PowerPoint template, see the other two parts of this series below:

► PPT Template Design #1: https://youtu.be/oXCjOhlOROw
► PPT Template Design #2: https://youtu.be/Rs--ueJIF7c

To learn more about creating your own templates in PowerPoint including template design ideas, tips and resources, see the below blog post for more information: https://nutsandboltsspeedtraining.com/powerpoint-tutorials/create-powerpoint-template/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
See how to create a PowerPoint template, manage your PowerPoint placeholders, learn the difference between PNG and JPEG and more, to make sure your content shows up correctly within the slides you build.

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE:
http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

In this second PowerPoint template tutorial series (part 2 of 3), you'll learn learn how to edit the content placeholders on the Parent Slide Master, so that they apply to the rest of the slides and layouts in your PowerPoint template. You’ll also learn how to properly format the placeholders so that you avoid headaches down the road, and how to adjust and add more guides to your Slide Master.

Along the way, you’ll also learn:
- How to align text in a placeholder to the bottom, keeping text aligned throughout your PowerPoint template
- How to add dummy text to your PowerPoint placeholders on your Slide Master
- How to add and format your footer, date, and slide numbers
- How to adjust the bullet point spacing in your text placeholders
- How to align text in a placeholder to the right and left
- How to test the space you have in your layout for text
- What's the difference between JPEGs and PNGs
- How to add a logo to every slide in PowerPoint

This is the second of three parts to this PPT template training series. To learn more about how to make a professional PowerPoint template, see the other two parts of this series below:

► PPT Template Design #1: https://youtu.be/oXCjOhlOROw
► PPT Template Design #3: https://youtu.be/Kv9jnnmGXBs

To learn more about creating your own templates in PowerPoint including template design ideas, tips and resources, see the below blog post for more information: https://nutsandboltsspeedtraining.com/powerpoint-tutorials/create-powerpoint-template/
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
See how to print PowerPoint with notes PLUS some recommendations to make your handouts look more professional.

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

Print PowerPoint With Notes Tutorial Description:

This might seem obvious, but to print your PowerPoint slides as handouts with notes, you first have to have notes typed into PowerPoint slides using the notes pane. If you have typed your notes in any other place other than the notes pane, your PowerPoint slides will not print with notes.

To double check that you have notes in your PowerPoint slides, simply open up the notes pane. In the Normal PowerPoint view, simply hit the Notes Shortcut CTRL+SHIFT+H.

Once the notes pane is open, you can resize it using your mouse. This is where you need to have your notes types if you want to be able to print your slides with notes, or see your speaker notes in the Presenter view of your presentation ALT+F5 on your keyboard.
Once you have speaker notes in your presentation, you can print them using the Normal print dialog box from the File Menu, or hit Print shortcut CTRL+P on your keyboard.

Within the Print Layout options, you can choose to either print your PowerPoint slides with notes directly below the slide thumbnail, or you can choose the 3-slide layout to print PowerPoint with lines to the right, allowing other people to take notes during your presentation.

Either way you go, assuming you are distributing your notes as handouts before or after your presentation, I highly recommend customizing your handouts with your company logo and contact information. Customizing your handouts in this way will not only make your handouts look more professional, it also enables people to get in touch with you after the fact if they need more help – generating more leads and clients for your business.

You can customize your handouts in this way using either the Notes Master or the Handout Master in PowerPoint, just as you would normally edit a PowerPoint slide. See the video tutorial for details on how to do this.

If you want to get multiple slides on a same page with your notes, all you need to do is export your PowerPoint slides to word using the Create Handout features.

This allows you to not only print multiple slides on the same page with notes, it also allows you to print just your notes in PowerPoint. See my other PowerPoint YouTube video below for step-by-step instructions.

https://youtu.be/j-10BGBOgq8
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
See how to print PowerPoint notes only plus see how to make sure your handouts look more professional.

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

Print PowerPoint Notes Only Tutorial Description:

The trick to printing your PowerPoint notes only is first exporting your notes to Microsoft Word, and then making some minor tweaks and adjustments in Word.

But before you get carried away, it’s important that you have your PowerPoint notes in the right place.

This might seem obvious, but before you can print your PowerPoint notes (in any format) you first need to have them typed in the Notes Pane in PowerPoint. You can open the notes pane by hitting the CTRL+SHIFT+H keyboard shortcut in the normal view (you can also resize the pane with your mouse).
This is where you need to type your speaker notes if you want to print your notes (in any format) or see your notes as a prompt when presenting in the Presentation View of your slides (ALT+F5).

Once you have your notes ready to go in PowerPoint, to print just your notes you need to first export your slides to Microsoft Word as handouts using the Create Handouts command in the Export tab of the File Menu. Using the create handout command pushes your slides (and notes) into Microsoft Word in a Table format.
The beauty of the table format in Word is that you can then make whatever customizations you want to the table including:

(1) Deleting the thumbnail column so you only have your notes left
(2) Copying and pasting your Outline View slide titles into the table so you have some context for your notes
(3) turning your table into text so that your notes stack up vertically on the page.

NOTE: Once you push your notes into Word, whatever edits you make to your Notes in Word will not sync back to PowerPoint. If want to change your notes in PowerPoint, you’ll need to make those adjustments in the Notes Pane within PowerPoint, and then re-export your notes as handouts to Word.

On top of simply formatting your PowerPoint notes in Word themselves, assuming you are distributing your notes as handouts, I highly recommend customizing the header and footer of your handouts in Word with your company information and contact information.

That not only makes your handouts look more professional, it also allows people to contact you in the future if they want to get a hold of you – generating more leads and clients for your business.
If want to learn some other general tips for Printing Notes in PowerPoint, see my other YouTube video below:
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
See how to turn your screen black during a PowerPoint presentation using your keyboard shortcuts WITHOUT turning off your computer or putting it to sleep.

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/Save-40-Hours

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

PowerPoint Black Screen Tutorial description:

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to turn your screen black during a PowerPoint presentation using your keyboard shortcuts.

That way if someone asks you a question in the middle of your presentation, or if you want to take a break, you can quickly turn your PowerPoint screen black by using the B key on your keyboard.

When you are ready to dive back into your presentation, simply use shortcut again and you can resume your presentation.

On top of that, in this tutorial I also share with you the trick to using that black screen as a blackboard so that you can take notes on it or interactive with your audience.

To see that trick, plus another keyboard shortcut I recommend learning, as it delivers 32 different shortcuts for you without having to memorize anything, see the PowerPoint tutorial video above.
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
See how to create double line borders for your PowerPoint Tables to create the Accounting style format for your financial statements (IS, BS and CF).

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/SAVE40HOURS

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

————————————
POWERPOINT TUTORIAL OVERVIEW

Double line borders for your Accounting Style Formatting.

…in Microsoft Word it’s EASY.
…in Microsoft Excel it’s EASY.
…in Microsoft PowerPoint it’s impossible (or is it)?

In Word and Excel, you just open the cell Border Styles dropdown options and there it is (BOOOOOOM).

NOT the case in PowerPoint.

PowerPoint requires a little bit of hack-trickery to pull it off.

There were some great submissions for solving the double cell underline challenge, including using line reflections (that I had never considered before).

Kudos to Charles who figured out what I was doing.

To see the PowerPoint trick to pull this off to get the correct accounting format for financial statements, check out the above tutorial.

You’ll also learn clever ppt trick for adjusting the double cell border style and thickness so you can change it up as your presenting different blocks of information.

That’s an extra little Red Rover Technique trick to make your presentations look great.

See you at Happy Hour!
Add a comment...

Post has attachment
Learn how to double underline in Word, Excel and PowerPoint using 1 single keyboard shortcut.

★ SAVE 40 HOURS IN POWERPOINT
http://bit.ly/SAVE40HOURS

⚑ SPEED DEMONS SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/PPTSpeed

POPULAR POWERPOINT RESOURCES I CREATED
► 886 free Icon Bundle Download: http://bit.ly/Free-Icon-Bundle
►120 PowerPoint Shortcuts PDF: http://bit.ly/PPT-Shortcuts
► 15 Storytelling Tips PDF: http://bit.ly/Story-Telling-Tips
► Nuts & Bolts Speed Training: http://bit.ly/PowerPoint-Speed-Training

————————————
POWERPOINT TUTORIAL OVERVIEW

One way to save time and get faster in PowerPoint is learning which shortcuts carry across the entire Microsoft Office Suite.

Yes, you can learn the individual shortcuts for each program, but why bother when sometimes a single shortcut works across all 3 programs.

The double underline shortcut is one of these triple dipper shortcuts that works in Word, Excel and PowerPoint. See this short video to learn this secret shortcut :).

The interesting thing here is that technically each program has it's own shortcut to get at the font dialog box.

Word - CTRL+D
PowerPoint - CTRL+T
Excel - CTRL+SHIFT+F

Each one of these shortcuts is OKAY to use, but why bother learning 3 shortcuts when one specific shortcut works in all three programs.

That's why once you've learned how to double your productivity in one program, it's fairly easy to double your productivity in the other programs as well.

Check out this short video tutorial to see how it's done.
Add a comment...
Wait while more posts are being loaded