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Nova Driving School
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The fall foliage is a beautiful sight, but it can pose unexpected dangers for drivers. Many drivers don’t realize that their traction on wet leaves is about as limited as their traction on ice and snow. When you stop on pavement covered in wet leaves, your tires will come in contact with the leaves rather than the pavement. As a result, your chances of going into a skid increase.

When you’re driving on streets with leaves on the pavement, slow down and increase your following distance so that you’ll be able to stop in time if the car in front of you stops unexpectedly.

In addition, exercise caution when parking near dry leaves, especially if you park in a neighborhood with mature trees on the parkways. Heat from your car’s catalytic converter or muffler could set a leaf pile on fire. If you need to park on a tree-lined street during autumn, look for a space where you can see clear pavement to minimize the risk of fire.
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The best type of crash is the crash that doesn’t happen. Many new vehicles offer safety systems (either standard or optional) that apply the brakes automatically to avoid rear-end collisions, maintain a pre-set distance between vehicles through adaptive cruise control, and alert the driver to blind-spot hazards and rear-cross traffic in parking lots, among other forms of driver assistance.

Electronic stability control, standard on all cars since 2012, can help you avoid a crash by keeping a car under control during an abrupt steering maneuver.
David Champion, Senior Director of Automotive Testing for Consumer Reports, published by Consumers Union, has observed, “Electronic stability control is the single most important advance in auto safety since the development of the seatbelt.”

When you’re shopping for a new or used vehicle, consider its crash test ratings and its advanced safety systems—the extra focus on safety could save your life.
To view a list of the most-common advanced safety systems, we invite you to visit Consumer Reports’ Web site at https://www.consumerreports.org/car-safety/cars-with-advanced-safety-systems/
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Congratulations to Clark, Gabi, and Zach for their excellent work during the classroom phase of Driver Education at Nova this summer! Students in Nova’s Teen Program learn the Illinois Rules of the Road as well as strategies for sharing the road with other motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians; performing parking and turning maneuvers; driving in inclement weather; addressing vehicle equipment failures; and incorporating safe, defensive driving into every trip, among other topics.

To learn more about Nova’s Teen Program, we invite you to visit our Teen Programs Web page at http://novadriving.com/our-programs/teen-programs/
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Happy Birthday, Nils Bohlin! This week marks the 97th anniversary of the birth of Nils Bohlin, the Volvo engineer who invented the three-point safety belt in 1958. Bohlin, who died in 2002, designed a single-piece safety belt (also known as a lap-shoulder belt) that featured a shoulder harness connected to a lap belt. His invention was a major improvement over the earlier lap-only safety belts, which often caused abdominal injuries in crashes.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, wearing a lap-shoulder safety belt reduces the risk of injuries and deaths in vehicle crashes by 50%. As Nils Bohlin (and students in Nova’s Teen Program) would advise, “Don’t forget to buckle up!”
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Whether you’re running errands in your neighborhood or driving on a long road trip across the country, inclement weather and limited visibility are concerns that can’t be overlooked on the road. Students in Nova’s Teen Program classes recently illustrated adverse weather conditions and limited-visibility conditions and described how to drive safely in their chosen condition. We invite you to enjoy their work—and perhaps even pick up a few safety tips next time you have to drive in less-than-ideal conditions.
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Driving in bad weather requires lower speeds, advance planning, and greater caution. Nova’s Teen Program students are ready for the challenges of dealing with rain, snow, and fog. Below, we’ve featured some of their recommendations for driving in adverse weather conditions. http://ow.ly/i/wMdl9 http://ow.ly/i/wMdlD http://ow.ly/i/wMdn7 http://ow.ly/i/wMdnL
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"There are two kinds of light - the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures." - James Thurber, American author and humorist (1894-1961)

Although author James Thurber never taught driver education classes, he likely would agree that driving in glare poses significant risks to drivers and other road users. The process of identifying traffic signs and signals as well as pedestrians, motor vehicles, and bicyclists is challenging when drivers are blinded by bright glare. Through a recent illustration activity, students in Nova’s Teen Program classes have shed some light on how drivers can manage the dangers of glare. We hope that you enjoy their work! http://ow.ly/i/wMcnt http://ow.ly/i/wMcp0
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Whether you’re traveling in your neighborhood or driving on a long road trip across the country, prospect of inclement weather and limited visibility are concerns that can’t be overlooked on the road. Students in Nova’s Teen Program classes recently illustrated adverse weather conditions and limited-visibility conditions and described how to drive safely in their chosen condition.

We invite you to enjoy their work—and perhaps even pick up a few safety tips next time you have to drive in less-than-ideal conditions.
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Students between 18 and 20 who have not previously taken a driver education class can complete their Adult Driver Education class in one day with Nova! The 6-hour class covers such topics as the Illinois Rules of the Road, sharing the road, driving in inclement weather, driving at night, the risks and consequences of drugs and alcohol, and many other topics. The students pictured here completed Nova’s July 9 ADE class at our 2058 N. Western Ave. location.

For more information, or to register for an upcoming class, visit us online at http://novadriving.com/our-programs/adult-programs/ http://ow.ly/i/wLak3
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Warm weather, sunny skies, and clear pavement are in our future. With good weather comes an increase in the number of motorcyclists on the roads. To drive safely near motorcycles, follow the 12 tips below from Purdue University:

-Search the traffic around you constantly and expect to see motorcycles.
-Check your blind spots before changing lanes or merging, especially in heavy traffic.
-Double-check traffic at intersections before you turn or pull out.
-Motorcycles can easily be hidden in traffic. Look for a helmet above, tires below, or a shadow alongside a vehicle that you can’t see around.
-Most crashes between cars and motorcycles involve turning left at an intersection. If you are preparing to cross traffic or turn left, take a second look for motorcycles.
-Because motorcycles are smaller than cars, it is harder to see them and more difficult to judge their approach speed in traffic.
-Do not drive your car in the same lane as a motorcycle. It is unsafe and illegal.
-Treat motorcyclists with the same respect and courtesy you afford to other motorists.
-Failure to obey and yield the right-of-way can result in the death or serious injury of a motorcyclist.
-Stay focused on the driving task. Inattentive driving is a major cause of car-motorcycle crashes.
-Use turn signals to indicate your next move. This allows the motorcyclist anticipate traffic flow and find a safe lane position.
-Remove all possible distractions that can interfere with the driver’s attention, and remove any objects that may block the driver’s view.
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