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Nottingham Therapy - Vauna Beauvais MSc
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The Four Main Health Benefits of Love
The Four Main Health Benefits of Love
improveeverydayblog.blogspot.co.uk
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STOPPING SELF SABOTAGE

Entertaining, yet it hits you between the eyes! For Career and Relationship expertise, listen to Mel Robbins tell you straight as she drills through the mental clutter that stands between people and what they want.
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THE 4 TYPES OF STRESS, AND HOW TO COMBAT THEM...

While everyone experiences different physical and emotional symptoms of stress, it's important to understand how you respond to each one. When you can recognise the type of stress you're experiencing, you can take steps to manage it more effectively.
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The authors state, "It’s exhausting needing to be in control all the time, isn’t it?"
And I have to say, "Yes, it is".

And the truth really is that any sense of control that we think that we have is false anyway.

What if, The greatest control is in letting go of the need for it?

Our greatest power is in learning how to trust. When we focus on our desires with a sense of non-attachment to exactly how they unfold, it releases the blocks and opens us up to greater opportunity.
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Scientists have discovered a major significant genetic factor underlying binge eating (published in the online journal 'Biological Psychiatry').

These findings may lead to new therapeutic treatments which could ultimately save lives and restore healthy eating behaviours in conditions such as compulsive overeating, bulimia nervosa, anorexia nervosa and even substance use disorders.

Eating disorders are among the most lethal of neuropsychiatric disorders. Compulsive binge eating affects millions of people suffering from eating disorders and obesity.

It is characterised by episodes of eating large quantities of food, often very quickly and to the point of discomfort. Binge eaters often experience a loss of control during the binge as well as shame, distress or guilt afterwards.

This discovery could potentially lead to treatments targeted to normalise eating behaviours.
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GRATITUDE IS AWESOME - IT MAKES YOUR BRAIN HAPPY, YOU HAPPY AND YOUR PARTNER HAPPY.

Gratitude boosts the neurotransmitter dopamine, affects neuron density and creates a positive feedback loop in your relationships.

One powerful effect of gratitude is that it can boost serotonin. Trying to think of things you are grateful for forces you to focus on the positive aspects of your life. This simple act increases serotonin production in the anterior cingulate cortex.

It’s not finding gratitude that matters most; it’s remembering to look in the first place. Remembering to be grateful is a form of emotional intelligence. One study found that it actually affected neuron density in both the ventromedial and lateral prefrontal cortex. These density changes suggest that as emotional intelligence increases, the neurons in these areas become more efficient. With higher emotional intelligence, it simply takes less effort to be grateful.

And gratitude doesn’t just make your brain happy — it can also create a positive feedback loop in your relationships. So express that gratitude to the people you care about.
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Does Seeing a Therapist Benefit You?

Here are 18 reasons why individual sessions with a specialist will often be more effective than self-help or attending a seminar (particularly Large Group Awareness Trainings).

1. Making a symbolic declaration (Making the decision to attend sessions with a specialist is the turning point. You've admitted there is a problem and made decision to solve it. And in making the appointment you are sending yourself  a message that solving a certain problem is important for you).

2. The engagement effect (putting time and money into it makes it become a project you're working on and so youre much more likely to succeed)

3. Stronger concentration (therapists are trained to concentrate on the conversation to a very high degree - so talking with them keeps you focused).

4. Knowledge (therapist likely has deeper and broader knowledge on the subject than you do, as well as the necessary skills and experience.)

5. Pointing out what you cannot see (e.g. body language incongruities, hidden emotions, piece together seemingly unconnected details, and point out the dysfunctions of the system you live with that are not helping)

6. Hitting the right spot (looking in from outside enables therapist to see the hole in your understanding of reality and will know what practices can help to remedy this).

7. Support from someone outside the process (therapist can get you to go beyond defensive blockages, because they are not emotionally distressed)

8. Sharing responsibility (sharing responsibility can bring relief from crippling overwhelm)

9. Concentrating precisely on your needs and moving from theory to application (individual work focuses precisely on your needs - and helps you to apply it to your actual unique situations - more helpful than training because logical understanding is something completely different from applying knowledge in real life).

10. Drawing attention to the difficulties in implementing new behaviours (therapist sees your blind spots, e.g. patterns or unhelpful strategies the client uses)

11. Gaining insights from talking about problems out loud (surprising realisations may happen when you hear yourself say things out loud) 

12. Possibility of working on the relationship between the client and the specialist (a skilled psychotherapist will make good use of the transference, to assist the client or bring in new awareness to change perspectives)

13. Drawing attention to your strengths (reminding you of the resources you’ve got in order to find the solution, and helping you to apply them)

14. Feeling safe (with the therapist, in the therapeutic space).

15. Using touch and the body (some therapists will usefully talk about this, but not apply touch to clients)

16. Positive interjections (developing a mechanism that works as an “internal therapist.”)

17. Modelling functional behaviours. (seeing what relevant constructive behaviour looks like and what thought processes lead to it.)

18. Opening the therapeutic process. (making a mental space for certain emotions, thoughts, memories to come up)
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