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Northwest Wildlife Preservation Society
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Today is world Lizard Day and we’re celebrating our wonderful reptile friends like this Pygmy Short-horned lizard who calls British Columbia his home. The Pygmy Short-horned lizards can be identified by their flattened body that’s no more than 12cm long, but their camouflage is extremely effective as they burrow deep into sandy soils, so spotting one is not that easy! These lizards are known to inflate their bodies and open their mouths up wide to scare off predators (or humans) so if you do manage to see one, prepare for quite a huffy puffy display!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Short-horned-lizard-phrynosoma-douglassi.jpg
Photo credit Jon Starling
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Last week we said goodbye to our summer student Nicole Wild. As a Graphic Design for marketing student at the Chip and Shannon Wilson School of Design at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Richmond, Nicole was a great Outreach Assistant, helping us engage with local communities about wildlife preservation. We wish her all the best this upcoming school year!
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Wishing our Special Projects Director David and Board Director Todd a very Happy Birthday today. Hope it's a HOOT!
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Wishing a very Happy Birthday to our Wildlife Education Manager Connel!
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Did you know that the range of the great grey owl is from Siberia to Alaska across the Bering Sea. It then spans across northern Canada to Hudson Bay and dips down the Rocky Mountains to northern California, Wyoming, and Idaho.

Photo by Simon Pierre Barrette, Cephas
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Did you know that the great grey owl is characterized by its lack of ear tufts, a white moustache, a black triangular beard, and yellow piercing eyes. This bird also has large facial discs, encircled with dark gray concentric circles that make the eyes appear small. It has a distinctly long tail and a relatively large head. Its under-parts are heavily streaked with brown and white, and its toes are densely-feathered. The plumage of both sexes is similar, with the female being larger in size than the male. When in flight, the owl displays barred feathers that vary from shades of gray to ones that are greyish brown.

Photo by jok2000
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Did you know that the great grey owl, or Strix nebulosa, is from the family strigidae. It is a majestic and uncommon member of the owl family. The great grey owl is the largest owl in North America, though it is outweighed by the snowy owl. The great grey weighs around 1.8 kg, its feathers alone weigh more than its entire skeleton! The length of this owl is 61-84 cm and it has a wingspan of 137-152 cm.

Photo by Paul Reynolds
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Did you know that the fisher is found only in North America. Historically, it ranged the northern forests of Canada and the United States as well as forests in the Appalachian, Rocky and Pacific Coast Mountains. Today, fishers are found only in parts of their historic range. In the United States, they exist in portions of the Appalachian Mountains from New England south to Tennessee; northern Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula; northern Idaho and western Montana; and three small West Coast populations in southwestern Oregon, northwestern California, and the southern Sierra Nevada.

Photo by Emily Brouwer, NPS
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Did you know that although fishers are competent tree climbers, they spend most of their time on the forest floor. They prefer dense, continuous forest to other habitats. Fishers have been found in extensive conifer forests typical of the boreal forest but are also common in mixed hardwood and temperate rainforests. Fishers prefer areas with continuous overhead cover with greater than 80% coverage and will avoid areas with less than 50% coverage. Fishers are more likely to be found in old-growth forests.

Photo by Emily Brouwer, NPS
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Did you know fishers have five toes on each foot with unsheathed, retractable claws. Their feet are disproportionately larger than their legs, making it easier for them to move on top of snow packs. In addition to the toes, there are four central pads on each foot. On the hind paws there are coarse hairs that grow between the pads and the toes, giving them added traction when walking on a variety of surfaces. Fishers have extremely mobile ankle joints, which can rotate their hind paws almost 180 degrees, allowing them to agilely move through tree branches and climb down trees head first.

Photo by Pacific Southwest Region of the US Forest Service
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