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North Carolina Museum of History
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The 21st Annual American Indian Heritage Celebration is coming up in November! #TeaserAlert http://ow.ly/VcOo301iPhQ

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Welcome to March and National Craft Month! Today’s #TextileTuesday revisits the little-known craft of making clothing from bed and bath linens… This mid-1960s pamphlet attempted to persuade consumers that Fieldcrest products were beautiful enough to wear. The company hosted “Fashions by Fieldcrest” runway shows across the country and worked with patternmakers to sell instructions to the public. Check out the pantsuit (Vogue pattern 7293) made from 7 Polynesia bath towels! Does anyone out there remember sewing or wearing clothing like this?
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Summer may not seem like it’s just around the corner, but baseball season has begun—at least in the ACC. Today is N. C. State’s home opener, and in honor of the first crack of the bats, #TextileTuesday features a NCSU letter sweater. Josh Mewborn (1922–2002), of Snow Hill, was a member of the 1946 baseball team that won the “Big Four” championship against in-state rivals Duke, UNC-CH, and Wake Forest. The team was one of the last to be call the “Red Terrors.” In late 1946 all NCSU sports teams adopted the nickname Wolfpack.
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For those of you who just didn’t get enough loving on Valentine’s Day, #TextileTuesday offers up a virtual hug from our Love-a-lot Care Bear (after all, her special job is to help spread love…). Love-a-lot dates to 1983, the year Kenner first released the Care Bears as plush toys. The bears were a cultural phenomenon in the 1980s and 1990s, with a television show and several movies. And they’re still going strong today—Netflix just launched a new Care Bears and Cousins series in late-2015.
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Sixty-seven years ago yesterday (on February 8, 1949), North Carolina governor Kerr Scott officially received our state’s “Merci Train” boxcar. The car was one of 49 delivered to America filled with small thank-you gifts chosen by thousands of individual French citizens in appreciation for relief supplies sent to France following World War II. The gifts ran the gamut from hand-crafted works of art to everyday items. Today’s #TextileTuesday features just a few of the many textile objects that were on the boxcar and that are now part of our collection.
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Today, #TextileTuesday looks back 25 years, to February 1, 1991. On that day, Once Around went into wide release. This movie is one of hundreds that have been shot in North Carolina. In the film Renata (Holly Hunter) marries an older man (Richard Dreyfuss) against the wishes of her father (Danny Aiello). A portion of the filming took place in Durham, which stood in for Boston, while the wedding and reception were shot at the Governor’s Mansion in Raleigh. Hunter wore this Christian Dior gown during those scenes.
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#free celebration continues until 4:30 #AACC2016 Dance, music, crafts, performance, artists, talks, & more! http://ncmuseumofhistory.org/AACC_2016

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The final installment in our January #TextileTuesday historical fashion trend series features the paper dress. The Scott Paper Company created the first of these disposable garments (which usually sold for around $1) in 1966 as an advertising gimmick. The trend caught on quickly and lasted through the rest of the decade. By 1967 Mars Manufacturing, of Asheville, was the nation’s top producer of paper clothing, filling over 80,000 orders per week. Our late-1960s paper dress was made by Smart Set Sportswear, also of Asheville. It is 80% cellulose and 20% cotton.
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Movie buffs and aficionado--here's your chance to screen that film you made. February 1 is the late deadline for submissions to May's Longleaf Film Festival.

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Attention Shakespeare fans! Today at 10 a.m. is the drawing that determines the order that theatrical groups will perform during the museum and Burning Coal Theatre's Shakespeare Marathon: 38 Plays in 5 Days. This event is a round-the-clock reading of all 38 plays by Shakespeare starting at noon Saturday, April 23, through Thursday, April 28, at the museum.The event is free.
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