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Norman Maynard
Works at College of Charleston
Attended University of Oklahoma
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Norman Maynard

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Once you've seen the Jon Stewart video on the subject, UCSD's James Hamilton can explain what actually went down.
Econbrowser. Analysis of current economic conditions and policy. « Consumption: Distinguishing between Keynesian and Permanent Income Motivations, and Deleveraging | Main | Supply Chains and the Futur...
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George, thanks. Glad to hear from you.
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Economist Philosophy.
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Interesting thoughts; lots of pushback in the comments, though.
From Karl Smith: I don’t know if I’ve heard anyone say this and I am not quite sure what I think about it myself, but one way to view the economy in the Information Age is that the returns to
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I see this in the Art and Media world you have either the extreme specialist or the generalist. Most established money making artists have a sea of underlings to do their work. Or in my case I am a generalist and almost everything is done by an extreme specialist or a computer.

Though my industry is one of making speculative bets over and over again and hoping a few work out. So how that relates to normal things like making pins I don't know.
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And now... the minority report. Possibly the least popular opinion +Robin Hanson has ever expressed.
Forget 9/11. By Robin Hanson · September 11, 2011 9:10 am · Comments (26) · « Prev ·. Opening my Sunday comics this morning I see half are not-funny 9/11 memorials. Half of media commentary also seems...
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Interesting thoughts (via +Anthony Bradley's blog; hopefully we can keep this from being "the least [...] re-posted video of Keller ever.")
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Slightly creepy, but completely funny
Joe Carter originally shared:
 
If Google Was Your Boyfriend
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Have them in circles
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Norman Maynard

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I'm sticking with the same Nobel prediction I always make (and always get wrong): William Nordhaus for contributions to environmental econ. (My runner-up guess would be Hausman and White for econometrics.)
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I'm actually teaching international econ in the spring; maybe all the questions all semester should be set in Middle-Earth?
Seen on an International Political Economy quiz: The world of Middle-Earth has become largely peaceful, and international trade is growing. The Shire, Gondor, and Mordor are three countries in M......
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This is why I get frustrated when people attribute unexpected behavior to 'irrationality.'
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Randomly saw this. The article is definitely correct. It doesn't help that the invocation of "people are irrational" is ad hoc. Most people will provide reasons for human behavior in certain contexts, and orderly behavior is noticed(rational in a plain economic sense or no). "People are irrational", if true, would apply to all situations though. Additional absurdity would arise as the person claiming "People are irrational" would also have to be doing it irrationally, which, means that their claim could be regarded as self-defeating, UNLESS they make modifications or are willing to accept modifications to make the notion more tractable, or unless they are ad hoc and say "Every human behavior except the recognition of human irrationality is irrational".
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from madmenyourself
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I've long thought physical presence and real-time interaction were essential to actually learning something from schooling. I think the predicted doom of higher ed critically relies on finding a good substitute for this face time. Is it possible that social media, especially G+ with its circles, could provide that substitute? I'd love to hear academics and educators (or even someone from Google, +Josh Woodward) on this question.(+William Easterly and +Arnold Kling also seem interested in online education and the role of social media these days)
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Well, I can see REMOVING letters, but I can't see adding them. Adding them hurts the reputation benefits of signaling. You want high quality to be undoubted when you say it exists, and so this means taking every opportunity to trumpet this.
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It does seem a bit like this sometimes.
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Have them in circles
118 people
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Work
Occupation
Assistant Professor of Economics
Employment
  • College of Charleston
    Assistant Professor, 2013 - present
  • University of Oklahoma
    Adjunct Lecturer, 2012 - 2013
  • Humboldt State University
    Lecturer, 2011 - 2012
Story
Tagline
Assistant Professor of Economics - College of Charleston
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor of Economics at the College of Charleston. I received my Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Oklahoma in the summer of 2011.

My fields of research interest are growth and development, applied Bayesian econometrics, and empirical macroeconomics. Courses I have taught include Money and Banking, International Economics and Globalization, US Economic History, and Advanced Econometrics (graduate level).

Further information--such as my CV, teaching portfolio, and samples of research--is available at my College of Charleston site.
Education
  • University of Oklahoma
    Economics (PhD), 2006 - 2011