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Niranjan Tulpule
Works at Google
Attended University of Pune
Lives in San Jose, CA
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Niranjan Tulpule

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These are really stunning! 
Yoshida was a rare Japanese in the Indian subcontinent.
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As a purveyor of snark and irony, I heartily endorse this. 
 
In 2007, I encountered an unusual news story: the Chinese government had decreed that it would be illegal for Buddhist lamas to reincarnate without government permission. Having already encountered news stories about the Dongzhou Buddha Council, officially described as "a superstitious organization in charge of divine activities in Dongzhou," I started to imagine a special unit of the People's Liberation Army, trained in doctrine and religion, then killed so that they could infiltrate the Celestial Bureaucracy and ensure that nobody reincarnated without authorization.*

This week, postmortem tensions rose again, as the Dalai Lama suggested that he may decide not to reincarnate at all. The Chinese government is apparently quite unhappy with this, and says that this is not up to him: "Decision-making power over the reincarnation of the Dalai Lama, and over the end or survival of this lineage, resides in the central government of China," according to Party official Zhu Weiqun. 

If you ever thought that government gets too involved in your affairs, you ain't got nothing on the Dalai Lama.


In case it isn't clear, what Zhu is really saying is that the Dalai Lama should have no choice in whether he has a successor; he will have a successor, and that successor will be chosen by Beijing, and that successor will support Chinese official policy in Tibet. There are two things the Chinese government is perpetually terrified of: that regions which it considers "its own" (such as Tibet, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Xinjiang, the South China Sea, and for all I can tell also Japan, Australia, and Poland) might openly reject its rule, making its inability to control everyone it wants to manifest and exposing it to collapse; and that a religious or political movement within the country would lead to revolution. Religious movements are particularly worrisome because historically, many of China's biggest revolutions have been driven by the rise of sects like the Yellow Turbans; political movements tend to be driven by dissatisfied high officials with strong regional ties. For similar reasons, they work hard to suppress any notion of regional identity, suppressing local languages and festivals, and moving around populations to create new facts on the ground; this is why there has been a huge (government-sponsored) Han migration into Xinjiang, previously ethnically Uighur, in the past several years.

This is also why you will make enemies by referring to Chinese "languages;" officially, everything from Mandarin to Cantonese to Hakka is a single language, despite being mutually incomprehensible. The official argument is that they share a writing system, but as any linguist will explain to you, written languages are simply additional languages which people speak, not an intrinsic part of a spoken language; written and spoken English differ far more than you might guess. But suggesting that there is not a single Chinese language might imply that there is not a single Chinese people, and so perhaps there should not be a single Chinese state.

To be fair, there is some good reason behind this beyond a simple will to power: when Chinese governments fall, it historically leads to spectacularly bloody civil wars. The Communist takeover (including its various "cleanups" like the Great Leap Forward) cost between 30 and 70 million lives, by most estimates;** the previous uprising, the Taiping Rebellion of 1850-64, killed nearly 20 million, a figure all the more alarming when you realize that it was done mostly with farm implements. It was (by far) the deadliest war in human history at the time, and only the World Wars have surpassed it.

Of course, that's a fancy way of saying that by guaranteeing that any succession to you will have to be incredibly violent, you create a certain kind of incentive to let you stay in power. The overall logic of this, and how it might be applied elsewhere in life, is left as an exercise for the reader. 

* Several years later, this turned into a major plot point of an RPG I was running. The lama which the PC's were looking for turned out to have gone into hiding; he had died, and while an "official" reincarnation had been installed in his place, it quickly became clear that this wasn't the real deal; in fact, this special unit was still looking for the real incarnation, hoping to extract key information from him. The players ultimately found him in the countryside, having reincarnated as a Bactrian camel. When pressed as to why he chose this unusual hiding place, he replied in English: "Camel is sort of like lama, no?"

It is possible that I may have set up that entire year-long plot arc just so I could use that line.

** See e.g. http://necrometrics.com/20c5m.htm#Mao for a collection of estimates by different authors.
A comment by the Tibetan spiritual leader that he might not reincarnate has run afoul of the Communist Party.
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Such a beautifully written essay. 
I am now face to face with dying. But I am not finished with living.
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so cool
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A refreshingly counter argument to the nouveau Luddites.
Credit Sylvie Fleury, "Yes to All," 2008, courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York
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2014 Darwin Award nominee!
 
A recording from a GoPro camera on the plane, recovered from the crash site, showed the pilot taking cellphone selfies with a flash during a nighttime takeoff shortly before the crash, according to a National Transportation Safety Board report released last week. 
A pilot taking selfies may have contributed to the deadly crash of a small plane in Colorado last year, federal investigators said.
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+1 for the nomination!
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Give man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Give a man a mosquito net, he'll eat for a long time! 
The nets, with holes smaller than mosquitoes, trap much more than traditional fishing nets do and could wipe out stressed fish populations in Africa.
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Hi, am charles how are you

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Android UI testing done right 

We've been continuously refining our UI testing approach on Android, and I am proud of what my team has done so far. Good testing solutions don't just need good automation frameworks, but it also needs to be a fundamental part of how software is written. This is the first in a series of posts by +Mona Wagdy El Mahdy which describes how to build Android apps that are modular, and enable fast and stable UI tests and describes lessons learned while testing the very app you are using to read this post (Google+). 

http://googletesting.blogspot.com/2015/03/android-ui-automated-testing.html

[credits: +Eduardo Bravo, +Charles Munger, +Nicole Pereira, +Valera Zakharov, +Thomas Knych who have all contributed to this] 
by Mona El Mahdy Overview This post reviews four strategies for Android UI testing with the goal of creating UI tests that are fast, reliable, and easy to debug. Before we begin, let’s not forget an import rule: whatever ca...
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I don't always share such quizzes, but holy crap, this is amazing. 
 
This is amazing. 8/14.
Who said it: Pyongyang propagandists or viral visionaries?
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11/14
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This video needs to be updated :). 
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Personal computers were responsible for knocking off secretaries as the most common job in the 80s. Self driving cars are likely to do that for truck drivers, which at present is the most common job in the US. 
The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This map shows how those changes played out across the country.
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Good point.  I think there will be lots of change once we get to that point, with several industries impacted in a major way.  Oil and gas due to less fuel consumption / more efficient driving.  Car insurance industry due to fewer accidents.  What else?
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The Dude abides! 
 
Insane and amazing ad (?) from squarespace. I actually think it would be terrifying to use this when trying to sleep. www.dreamingwithjeff.com
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Quite a dramatic turnaround in CA. California still has many challenges such as the ongoing drought, crumbling infrastructure, high unemployment and poverty in parts of the state, high cost of living, etc still remain, but this is nonetheless a good milestone! 
California is overtaking Brazil as the world’s seventh-largest economy, bolstered by rising employment, home values and personal and corporate income, a year after the most-populous state surpassed Russia and Italy.
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When the economy does well, the politicians take credit, when the economy goes down, they say it's out of their hands..  Many businesses moved out of California because of high taxes and tough regulations; they are not coming back.. Yes, the economy is better, but could've been much better..
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Have him in circles
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Work
Occupation
Engineer
Employment
  • Google
    Señor Test Engineer, 2005 - present
  • CalSoft Pvt.Ltd. (India)
    Test Engineer, 2004 - 2005
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San Jose, CA
Previously
Mountain View, CA - Hyderabad, India - Pune, India - Waltham, MA
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Education
  • University of Pune
    Computer Engineering, 2000 - 2004
  • Stanford University
    Dabbled in CS, 2006 - 2007
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Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Good food. We had the tasting menu with the accompanying wine pairings. The pairings were done well and the food was great (taste, ingredients and presentation). The only negative aspect was that the service wasn't as polished.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
59 reviews
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The only Starbucks worth going to :).
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
Snobby and overpriced tastings. The wines are pretty mediocre.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
Great lunch option if you are in the Russian River valley wine country.
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago