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Niraj Pandey
Attends Southampton Solent University
Lives in Southampton
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Niraj Pandey

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I'm just sharing this for the eleven people in the world who haven't seen it.

Those shots of our planet always bring tears to my eyes. That's us, that's where we live, and we dont' have anywhere else to go. We should probably take better care of it.
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Finally ordered my #Nexus 8GB tablet. I have big hopes. Now to wait 2-3 weeks.
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The distant future is going to be beautiful and bright even during the night!
 
Milky Way is Destined for Head-on Collision with Andromeda Galaxy

NASA astronomers announced Thursday they can now predict with certainty the next major cosmic event to affect our Galaxy, +Sun, and +Solar System: the titanic collision of our +Milky Way Galaxy with the neighboring +Andromeda Galaxy.

The Milky Way is destined to get a major makeover during the encounter, which is predicted to happen four billion years from now. It is likely the Sun will be flung into a new region of our Galaxy, but our Earth and Solar System are in no danger of being destroyed.

"Our findings are statistically consistent with a head-on collision between the Andromeda Galaxy and our Milky Way Galaxy," said Roeland van der Marel of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore.

The solution came through painstaking NASA +Hubble Space Telescope measurements of the motion of Andromeda, which also is known as M31. The galaxy is now 2.5 million light-years away, but it is inexorably falling toward the Milky Way under the mutual pull of gravity between the two galaxies and the invisible dark matter that surrounds them both.

"After nearly a century of speculation about the future destiny of Andromeda and our Milky Way, we at last have a clear picture of how events will unfold over the coming billions of years," said Sangmo Tony Sohn of STScI.

The scenario is like a baseball batter watching an oncoming fastball. Although Andromeda is approaching us more than two thousand times faster, it will take four billion years before the strike.

Computer simulations derived from Hubble's data show that it will take an additional two billion years after the encounter for the interacting galaxies to completely merge under the tug of gravity and reshape into a single elliptical galaxy similar to the kind commonly seen in the local +Universe.

Although the galaxies will plow into each other, stars inside each galaxy are so far apart that they will not collide with other stars during the encounter. However, the stars will be thrown into different orbits around the new galactic center. Simulations show that our solar system will probably be tossed much farther from the galactic core than it is today.

To make matters more complicated, M31's small companion, the Triangulum galaxy, M33, will join in the collision and perhaps later merge with the M31/Milky Way pair. There is a small chance that M33 will hit the Milky Way first.

The universe is expanding and accelerating, and collisions between galaxies in close proximity to each other still happen because they are bound by the gravity of the dark matter surrounding them. The Hubble Space Telescope's deep views of the universe show such encounters between galaxies were more common in the past when the universe was smaller.

A century ago astronomers did not realize that M31 was a separate galaxy far beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Edwin Hubble measured its vast distance by uncovering a variable star that served as a "milepost marker."

Edwin Hubble went on to discover the expanding universe where galaxies are rushing away from us, but it has long been known that M31 is moving toward the Milky Way at about 250,000 miles per hour. That is fast enough to travel from here to the Moon in one hour. The measurement was made using the Doppler Effect, which is a change in frequency and wavelength of waves produced by a moving source relative to an observer, to measure how starlight in the galaxy has been compressed by Andromeda's motion toward us.

Previously, it was unknown whether the far-future encounter will be a miss, glancing blow, or head-on smashup. This depends on M31's tangential motion. Until now, astronomers have not been able to measure M31's sideways motion in the sky, despite attempts dating back more than a century. The Hubble Space Telescope team, led by van der Marel, conducted extraordinarily precise observations of the sideways motion of M31 that remove any doubt that it is destined to collide and merge with the Milky Way.

"This was accomplished by repeatedly observing select regions of the galaxy over a five- to seven-year period," said Jay Anderson of STScI.

"In the 'worst-case-scenario' simulation, M31 slams into the Milky Way head-on and the stars are all scattered into different orbits," said team member Gurtina Besla of Columbia University in New York, N.Y. "The stellar populations of both galaxies are jostled, and the Milky Way loses its flattened pancake shape with most of the stars on nearly circular orbits. The galaxies' cores merge, and the stars settle into randomized orbits to create an elliptical-shaped galaxy."

Science Illustration Credit: NASA, ESA, Z. Levay and R. van der Marel (STScI), and A. Mellinger
Science Credit: NASA, ESA, and R. van der Marel (STScI)
Explanation of the image from: http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2012/20/full/
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The Ocean in the Sky!
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Time to Play #ingress . Let's see if it lives up to the hype!
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What do 100,000 stars look like? 

The new Chrome Experiment “100,000 Stars” tries to answer that by visualizing Earth’s immediate stellar neighborhood using WebGL, CSS3D, and Web Audio. Take a tour through the neighborhood, or zoom around on your own, and marvel at the vast scale & beauty of our galaxy. If you’d like to read more about this experiment, head over to the Chrome Blog: http://goo.gl/rno5O

Check out "100,000 Stars" here: g.co/100000stars
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Love the new YouTube and google+ update. Now to wait for that nexus tablet. 
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CPA Australia Presents. An Audience with Neil Armstrong. In this four part series the first man to walk on the moon, gives a personal commentary on Apollo 11's historic lunar landing, his thoughts...
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So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish #Pep. Live long and prosper. Rest well and recharge. Congrats #Tito. May the force be with you.
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No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life.

Don't be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

- Steve Jobs
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Have him in circles
73 people
Dinesh Amagai's profile photo
Rudra Khanal's profile photo
Ekumar Shrestha (SEO Expert Nepal)'s profile photo
Narayan Dhungana's profile photo
Ron Roostan's profile photo
bhagawan kumal's profile photo
Ribej Gurung's profile photo
Justice Martins's profile photo
Pradip Kumar Chaudhary's profile photo
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Web Design and Development
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  • Web Design and Development, present
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Southampton
Previously
Kathmandu
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Web Developer
Education
  • Southampton Solent University
    Business Information Technology, 2011 - present
  • Southampton Solent University
    Business Systems and Web Computing, 2007 - 2010
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