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Nico Kempe
104 followers -
Today the coffee machine, tomorrow the world!
Today the coffee machine, tomorrow the world!

104 followers
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Want to learn Linux the hard way? Do you like living on the edge? Is "danger" your middle name?
Then try this distro that deletes all files every time you enter an incorrect command. Also available in a handy .deb package.  :)

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Sometimes I find myself configuring VIM again. I've had several .vimrc 's and one really complicated big all-in-one vim config with scripts and all, but I haven't found the right config yet.

This handy little online vim config generator seems pretty good though, so I thought I'd share it.

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Sometimes I find myself configuring VIM again. I've had several .vimrc 's and one really complicated big all-in-one vim config with scripts and all, but I haven't found the right config yet.

This handy little online vim config generator seems pretty good though, so I thought I'd share it.

So I decided to look who knocks at my server's door the most:
$ grep "invalid user" /var/log/auth.log{,.1} | cut -d " " -f 9 | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
    290 root
     42 admin
     25 vyatta
     25 ubnt
     24 arbab
     20 PlcmSpIp
     13 edit
     12 pi
      8 oracle
      6 log
      5 user
      5 debug
      4 zhangyan
      4 dff
      4 default
      3 cisco
      2 test
      2 info
      1 support
      1 nan
      1 nagios
      1 guest
      1 erika
      1 bin

Explanation of commands:
> grep "invalid user" /var/log/auth.log{,.1}
   this gets the failed login attempts from both auth.log and auth.log.1 (a log rotation file)
> cut -d " " -f 9
   treats the output as columns separated by single spaces, and only shows the 9th column, which contains the usernames
> sort | uniq -c | sort -nr
   sorts the output, summarizes it with totals for each username, and sorts that again numerically and in reverse order

My server hardly does anything these days, so imagine how many break-in attempts a more popular server gets each day.
This specific threat can be battled with a good sshd configuration (NEVER allow remote root logins!) and the pretty sweet fail2ban, which automatically blocks abusers by looking at logfiles.

Who is this vyatta character anyway? :)

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I'm easily entertained by the sound and sight of a multirotor whizzing by at 100 kilometres an hour, but equipping it with a defibrillator and using it for remote emergency assistance, that's just awesome.
The flying defibrillator drone created by Dutch TU Delft student Alec Momont flies at 100kph for a response time of just 1 minute. Theoretically increasing the chance of survival from 8 percent to 80 percent. The drone tracks emergency mobile calls and uses the GPS to navigate. Once at the scene, an operator, like a paramedic, can watch, talk and instruct those helping the victim by using an on-board camera connected to a control room via a livestream webcam

#soon   #exciting   #technology  

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Why do so many East-Asians wear masks?

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It's a known theory thought up by Galileo in 1638(?): in a vacuum objects with different mass will fall at the same speed.
This was demonstrated by Apollo 15 astronaut David Scott in 1971, when he dropped a hammer and a feather on the moon, both hitting the ground at the same time.

In this video the physicist Brian Cox shows the experiment once again, but this time it's in a huge vacuum chamber, with a bowling ball and feathers, and it is pretty awesome.

At the end he concludes with an interesting thought by Isaac Newton.
Remember the feather vs bowling ball in order to explain #gravity? Well, it is demonstrated at NASA's Space Power Facility in Ohio, by creating an enormous vacuum chamber. It's quite impressive to watch it despite it's a known fact.
Brian Cox visits the world's biggest vacuum chamber - Human Universe: Episode 4 Preview - BBC Two 

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I really dislike websites that don't work without JavaScript.
Even worse is this site, which has perfectly readable content, but then obscures it with a unclosable warning about disabling JavaScript. D'oh!

Never let the visibility of your content depend on scripts or CSS, especially in this time where every device can access the World Wide Web.
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TL;DR: Scientists mapped the motions of thousands of galaxies around the milky way to reveal our home on the grand scale: the Laniakea super cluster. For the first time, we are capable of defining the boundaries between these super clusters based on the flows of galaxies, and it's awesome!
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So earth sits in our local solar system, which bundles up with a bunch of other solar systems to form our solar interstellar neighbourhood. Then, we take thousands of those to make our galaxy: the Milky Way.
That's just the start, or hardly a start really, since we then take a bunch of these galaxies to make a local galactic group and then, we use thousands of those groups to make the Virgo super cluster.

But wait, there's more. A recent discovery showed that this Virgo super cluster is a part of again thousands of other super clusters, forming a sort of super super cluster.
..and of those super super clusters there are, err, well a lot I imagine..

The thing is, it's all connected. Our local planets swing around the sun just like it happens in the other solar systems, they act upon each other. The galaxies are connected too and bundle up in beautiful brain-like webs, and then those clusters are connected again, and again, eventually forming this super super cluster in which you can clearly see it's not just all scattered about but instead it's forming lines, grouping into something that looks organic, structured in some way.

If the scale of all this isn't enough to make your run outside to get some air, then imagine all these stars, planets, galaxies, clusters and super clusters grouping and moving together in a way that we'd see in various organisms and in nature, but on a huge scale, across distances I can't even begin to imagine, let alone describe.

"They should've sent a poet". :)
Scientists have mapped the motions of thousands of galaxies around the milky way to reveal our home on the grand scale: the Laniakea super cluster. For the first time, we are capable of defining the boundaries between these super clusters based on the flows of galaxies.

Check out the video for more: Laniakea: Our home supercluster
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