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Nick OHara
Lives in West Des Moines, Iowa
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Nick OHara

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This is an incredible performance. I had heard this song was intentionally created to be physically impossible to sing without editing. The Fifth Element singer sang every note but they were edited in the correct order.
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+StonedinFocus Only the aria at the beginning was written back then, not the 'impossible' part
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Excellent TED Talk from Mike Rowe back in 2009.
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Quite the awesome creation! The "light speed" icon is the most baffling of all.
 
This. Is. Awesome. 

Be sure to hit the source link to see an excellent, scrollable web page showing the distance between objects in the solar system. 
In the words of Douglas Adams, space is big. How big? "Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the...
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Some pretty neat tips!
 
I know some adults who could benefit from these as well.

Please follow: +Creative Ideas 
Being a new first-time parent means being inundated with questions. Do I need this? Am I a terrible parent if I don’t buy this for my child? Does anyone make anything that actually makes this any easier? Fortunately, second and third-time parents have been there and come out the other side like life-hacking ninjas. Here …
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I read this with the intent to find the holes in their logic, but then I realized I've already seen this happen in the airline industry. I used to always get my plane tickets through sites like Expedia, but now airline sites have wised up and offer deals just as good as those comparison sites. And if you call you have a greater chance of getting free upgrades, etc.

The main lesson: the best deals are achieved through effort. Effort used to mean calling/driving/walking to various stores to determine the best price, but comparison sites removed that effort, and therefore removed [some of] the savings. So now you have to find other means of finding deals.
 
Price-comparison websites should help lower prices. But left unchecked, they may raise them http://econ.st/1Micfyx
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This is on my "Once I win the lottery" list
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This is my favorite kind of prank.
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Ban uber! For the safety of our kids!
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Definitely seeing this soon.
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It's very good. I didn't know what to expect going in. My children loved it.
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"This is why I get so annoyed when I hear Apple’s PR machine talk about privacy. First, we have Tim Cook saying: “They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data.“

Then they launch two new services; Apple Music and Apple News, both featuring individual targeting, tracking and tailoring. Including integration to iAds.

I call shenanigans. 

Both Apple and Google track what you do. Both companies use that information. And both companies that keep information within themselves, thus ensuring your privacy stays intact. 

There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, as they both show, doing this creates much better products for you and me."
 
Apple and Privacy, Just like Google

One thing that really annoys me about Apple is how it is using its reality distortion field to twist the message about privacy. Only a week ago, Tim Cook said this:

”I’m speaking to you from Silicon Valley where some of the most prominent and successful companies have built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information. They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data. “

“We don’t think they’re worth have your email or your search history or now even your family photos data-mined and sold-off for God-knows-what advertising purpose.”

And then, at the WWDC Keynote, they announced the new Apple News app. What does this app do? Well… I quote from their product page:

”The stories you really care about. The more you read, the more personalized the News app becomes, refining the selection of stories delivered to your screen so they are relevant to you. Easily share articles with others and save them to read offline. News stays on top of the stories you’re interested in. So you can, too.”

So… how can Apple learn what it is that you are interested in, and deliver that information to you without tracking people?

Granted, at the keynote, Craig Federighi also displayed a slide pointing out the privacy features for Apple News. These included:

Anonymous
Not associated with Apple ID
Random identifier
Not linked to other Apple services
Not shared with third parties
You’re in control

Clearly pointing their fingers at Google.

First of all, this is a weird way of doing things. Not having the news targeting data linked to your Apple ID means that it can’t be used across devices. Your iPhone and your iPad won’t know which is which. And if you buy a new iPhone, you will have to teach your news app all over again from scratch.

What’s the point of that? That’s not a privacy issue. That’s just terrible UX. 

It’s also not linked to other Apple services, meaning that Apple won’t be able to show you news from where you are in Apple Maps, compared to your personal interests. That seems like a weird limitation, and again, poor UX.

Finally, we have the “Not shared with third parties”.

It’s so annoying. Why, because neither is Google
It’s the same thing. Google isn’t sharing anything. No advertiser sees any user data, ever.

It’s like when you advertise in a newspaper. You pay the newspaper to display the ad in the right section. But as an advertiser, you have no clue as to who it reaches. You just know it has been targeted right.

That’s how Google Adwords work.

More to the point, tools like Google Analytics work almost exactly like Apple News. It too is anonymous, not associated with people’s Google IDs, uses randomized identifiers, not linked to other Google services, nor is it shared with third parties. 

Granted, you can add aggregated demographic data to this as well, in which case it does link to Google Adwords, but it’s still anonymous, and you have no way to track that on an individual level.

I get so annoyed by this. Apple is promoting itself as the savior of privacy online, bashing Google and others with vaguely misleading statements along the way.

That said, there are genuine concerns about privacy as well.

For instance, there is a real problem around the whole industry of data brokers. These are companies who are buying and selling user data to the highest bidder, from anywhere. For instance, when you go into Target to buy a t-shirt, they will end up knowing your age, income, social status, your food preferences, and sometimes even your medical history. 

Similarly, when I then go into another store a week later, then they suddenly also know that I bought a T-shirt.

That’s not right. That’s terrible! It should be illegal for companies to buy/sell/share their data. (and indeed it is in my country).

If I go into a store, whatever I do and whatever I buy in this store should be kept between the store and me. It is a massive violation of trust when that store sells this information to others. 

That is a real privacy problem.

This also extends to websites. If I visit a newspaper, what I read should not be bought and sold by other companies. That is an interaction purely between me and the newspaper. 

The newspaper can target me all it wants based on the interaction that has taken place between us. But when I then visit another newspaper, they shouldn’t be allowed to know what topics of articles I read elsewhere. 

This is the whole concept of privacy. 

Apple is doing this right because what it tracks is kept within Apple. Which is good. And that is also how Google works. Whatever you do on Google, stays with Google.

But the rest of Apple PR bashing about privacy is just that, PR.

Look at Apple Music, which will be available on iPhone, iPad, Mac, Windows and Android. Here you can create your own playlists, follow artists, like, comment and share things.

The only way they can do that is by linking your actions to your Apple ID. How else would it be able to show you the playlist on your phone that you just created on your Mac? How else would it be able to keep track and notify you across devices when there is an update to something you engage with?

So, Apple is using your data, just like everyone else. As Apple says on their site (about Apple Music)

“Enjoy recommendations handpicked just for you or explore everything they find that’s new and noteworthy in the world of music. It’s all yours.”

“Even with a library this massive, finding the music you’re looking for is easy. The intelligent search engine remembers whether you’re looking in your local library or the Apple Music library, so you get results from the place you expect. You can also browse music you’ve looked for previously, and see what searches are trending.”

”Tell us what you like. Discover something you’ll love. When you tell us the genres and bands you’re into, we’ll bring you more suggestions from our experts who know and love music. They’re out at the big shows and the small gigs, combing scenes to bring you emerging artists and deep cuts, and creating playlists that feel like they’re coming from a friend who knows exactly what you want to hear.”

”The more you listen, the better we hear you. When we make recommendations, we consider what you tell us you like. Whether you love a song or not, your feedback helps our suggestions get better and better. But we also pay attention to what you actually play. So if you’re an EDM fan with a secret affinity for big band music, we’ll find you more stuff that swings. And drops the beat.”

How is this not exactly the same as what Google is doing with their services?

Oh, you say. But Apple isn’t using this to sell advertising. Really? 

Here is the description of ad targeting for the Apple News app:

”Monetization of Apple News Format content is simple with iAd, Apple’s advertising platform. When monetizing with iAd, you’ll have access to iAd’s segmentation capabilities, so your advertisers can reach just the right audience within your content. iAd targeting is accurate and scalable, and based on registration data from hundreds of millions of validated Apple users.”

So, when Apple said that Apple news was anonymous, not associated with Apple ID, uses a random identifier, nor linked to other Apple services, that apparently only applies to all the things that aren’t iAds. Because with iAds, they can accurately target your content to millions of Apple users.

Again, just like Google.

Add that Apple recently announced they will support ad blockers in Safari on the iPhone, thus blocking newspapers from earning money that way. While iAds does work in their own news app... well...

This is why I get so annoyed when I hear Apple’s PR machine talk about privacy. First, we have Tim Cook saying: “They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data.“

Then they launch two new services; Apple Music and Apple News, both featuring individual targeting, tracking and tailoring. Including integration to iAds.

I call shenanigans. 

Both Apple and Google track what you do. Both companies use that information. And both companies that keep information within themselves, thus ensuring your privacy stays intact. 

There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, as they both show, doing this creates much better products for you and me.

Let’s instead focus on the much more important issue of data brokers, and how data from one site is sold or given to others, thus causing one company to know what you did in another store. 

That is the real issue we should be dealing with. Not how data is used between us and the individual companies that we have chosen to be a part of.
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Apple is doing it client side (read:poorly) and Google is doing it server side (read:cross platform in the cloud). Apple is doing it more privately but much less effectively. Google, the opposite.
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West Des Moines, Iowa
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Ames, IA
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This place rarely disappoints and is exactly what you'd expect from a sports bar and grill. Lots of nice, big TVs showing a variety of sports, and the wait staff has generally been very good, or at least not bad. EDIT: I cannot remember when I wrote that review, but as of early-2014 the place has gone downhill dramatically. Their food is not as good as before, and their wait staff seem like they're unhappy/bitter.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Sometime during mid-2014 the management staff was switched out and the place got noticeably better. Employees were nicer and more on top of things. Bathroom is always clean. Only complaint, it's loud. The really high ceilings seem to amplify the noise of the soda and other drink machines so there's a dull roar in the place at all times.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
It's a local chain with this location "specializing" in pork. I haven't sampled much of the menu, but what I have had was as good as expected. The atmosphere and wait staff are excellent, though it can get a little loud when busy due to its very open nature, so don't plan on private conversations over a meal. Also, I eat here for lunch a few times per month and the food quality is very consistent. Two complaints: 1. The parking lot is very small. It probably fine for dinner, but at lunch the nearby Jimmy Johns is busy and uses up the little extra parking available. 2. Around late-2014 they switched from Heinz to their own ketchup. It's slightly sweeter and I've gotten used to it, but if given the chance I'd have them switch back. More restaurants seem to be doing this so it must be a cost saving measure.
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Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
We went here because the famous Maui Revealed guidebook recommended it very highly, and i can see why. Very professional staff, excellent facilities, private beach front to ensure privacy to luau guests, and outstanding food and drinks. Oh, and the show was top notch as well. We even had Miss Hawaii do a hula before the main show as a surprise. More expensive than hotel luau's, but you get a lot more value.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
22 reviews
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I walk here for lunch quite frequently. After a few weeks the staff started to recognize me and now they've started making my sandwich as soon as I walk in the door. They're very friendly and good at their job, plus they seem to know how conversational you want to be, not being too talkative or too quiet. Food quality is also been very consistent, only occasionally getting slightly old bread (usually when I get a late lunch after 1:00pm).
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
Great view, but the everything else was over rated. Thankfully we were early and didn't have a wait, but I've heard waits can reach over an hour. Go elsewhere.
Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago
I (30) and my wife (28) have stayed here twice together (2011 & 2015) and she stayed here with her family back in 1995. There's a reason for the repeat visits. While the units aren't the most modern looking, they work like newer ones (WiFi steamed HD video quite well). The pool is fine, but kids probably won't like it all that much, but we don't use the pool since the beach is a 10 second walk away. Ultimately, we keep coming back because it's a great value. $300/night for a studio with a full ocean view during peak season is excellent. We love Ka'anapali because of the 2.5 mile long, well groomed beach and the culture of Whaler's Village and nearby Lahaina. Our favorite activities are walking the beach and eating lunch on our balcony watching the whales <1 mile from shore.
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Public - 5 months ago
reviewed 5 months ago