Profile

Cover photo
Nick OHara
Lives in West Des Moines, Iowa
283 followers|397,812 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideosReviews

Stream

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
10
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
Some pretty neat tips!
 
I know some adults who could benefit from these as well.

Please follow: +Creative Ideas 
Being a new first-time parent means being inundated with questions. Do I need this? Am I a terrible parent if I don’t buy this for my child? Does anyone make anything that actually makes this any easier? Fortunately, second and third-time parents have been there and come out the other side like life-hacking ninjas. Here …
2 comments on original post
2
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
These boops were made for toddling... by Fowl Language Comics
10 comments on original post
5
1
Electrotechnology&GeneralEngineeringStudents's profile photo
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
I have believed the phrase "If it's free, you're not the customer" for a long time, but this comment from +Brian White within his original post has altered my view on this statement/belief:

"Google's money-making "product", if you insist on using that word, is in connecting those with something to sell with those that want to buy it.  If our users were a product, we would sell them, or their information, but we don't.  Ever.

A Realtor who connects a house seller with a house buyer is not selling the buyer.  A ticket agent who puts a band and a fan in the same stadium is not selling the fan.

Users are customers.  Publishers are customers.  Both are valued.  Google only succeeds if we provide the best possible service to both, giving both what they want.  And no disrespect to publishers but the user is, with a little thought, obviously the more important of the two.

To attempt to achieve any short-term gain by exploiting our users would damage the long-term prospects for the company which is why it makes as much business sense as it does moral sense to protect you, our users, as much as we can."
 
If you're not paying for the product, you are the product.

I have to admit, this is a catchy line.  It appeals to the inner cynic in us all and makes a certain amount of sense in a core, "what can you do for me," type of thinking.

But it's hog-wash.

I work for Google so I follow the news about the company and I'm really tired of seeing that first line, or some variation of it, spouted by people who really don't care enough to want to think it through.  It does not work that way!

Yes, Google is a company.  And yes, Google is a reasonably large company (though not that large compared to the likes of IBM, GE, etc.).  But though a company is a single entity in the eyes of the law, it is not run like that.  Google is full of many thousands of individuals, many of whom are more rabid about user privacy than the privacy watchdogs that complain.  I've watched them take Larry and Sergey to task on stage about the smallest things.  I've done it twice myself.  If the leaders of the company purposely violated our users' trust, there would be open revolt and the founders would be lucky to not find themselves strung up by their toes.

Everything Google does is done for our users.  Your happiness is always the first priority, even above Ads.  (I've seen this in both policy and various practical implementations.)  You are not product; you are our customers!  That's simply the way we view it and it permeates the company from bottom to top.  Everything is done to make a better service for you.

Even Ads is viewed as a service to our users.  Random ads are garbage.  Useful ads are a benefit.  Yes, it's also a benefit to our publishers and yes, it's also a benefit to our shareholders.  Since when did win-win-win arrangements become a bad thing?

I won't claim that Google always gets it exactly right or that we haven't made mistakes.  We don't and we have.  And we admit it.  And it will happen again.  Sorry.  But everything is done with the right intent even if it doesn't always work out as hoped.  Hindsight is perfect.

Google is the most moral company in which I have ever worked.  But guarding our users' privacy doesn't just make moral sense, it makes business sense.  If we purposefully violated our users' privacy, we wouldn't have a business at all before very long.
239 comments on original post
3
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
Now this is how the smartwatch can truly differentiate itself.
 
Aria: Gesture Control for Android Wear Smartwatches
http://www.gadgetify.com/aria-gesture/

Good idea? :)
36 comments on original post
2
Tim Fletchall's profile photoNick OHara's profile photo
2 comments
 
I assume the HR sensor in the wristband can be configured to detect the motion of individual tendons in your wrist.
Add a comment...
Have them in circles
283 people
Sharma Atul (Ajay)'s profile photo
Nemo Cardenas's profile photo
Michael Lindholm's profile photo
Leonard Payne's profile photo
Ida Fay's profile photo
Android Coliseum's profile photo
Wanpool's profile photo
Samantha Campbell's profile photo
Tim OConnor's profile photo

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
1
1
Tim Fletchall's profile photo
 
Ban uber! For the safety of our kids!
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
Definitely seeing this soon.
4
Scott Hunt's profile photo
 
It's very good. I didn't know what to expect going in. My children loved it.
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
"This is why I get so annoyed when I hear Apple’s PR machine talk about privacy. First, we have Tim Cook saying: “They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data.“

Then they launch two new services; Apple Music and Apple News, both featuring individual targeting, tracking and tailoring. Including integration to iAds.

I call shenanigans. 

Both Apple and Google track what you do. Both companies use that information. And both companies that keep information within themselves, thus ensuring your privacy stays intact. 

There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, as they both show, doing this creates much better products for you and me."
 
Apple and Privacy, Just like Google

One thing that really annoys me about Apple is how it is using its reality distortion field to twist the message about privacy. Only a week ago, Tim Cook said this:

”I’m speaking to you from Silicon Valley where some of the most prominent and successful companies have built their businesses by lulling their customers into complacency about their personal information. They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data. “

“We don’t think they’re worth have your email or your search history or now even your family photos data-mined and sold-off for God-knows-what advertising purpose.”

And then, at the WWDC Keynote, they announced the new Apple News app. What does this app do? Well… I quote from their product page:

”The stories you really care about. The more you read, the more personalized the News app becomes, refining the selection of stories delivered to your screen so they are relevant to you. Easily share articles with others and save them to read offline. News stays on top of the stories you’re interested in. So you can, too.”

So… how can Apple learn what it is that you are interested in, and deliver that information to you without tracking people?

Granted, at the keynote, Craig Federighi also displayed a slide pointing out the privacy features for Apple News. These included:

Anonymous
Not associated with Apple ID
Random identifier
Not linked to other Apple services
Not shared with third parties
You’re in control

Clearly pointing their fingers at Google.

First of all, this is a weird way of doing things. Not having the news targeting data linked to your Apple ID means that it can’t be used across devices. Your iPhone and your iPad won’t know which is which. And if you buy a new iPhone, you will have to teach your news app all over again from scratch.

What’s the point of that? That’s not a privacy issue. That’s just terrible UX. 

It’s also not linked to other Apple services, meaning that Apple won’t be able to show you news from where you are in Apple Maps, compared to your personal interests. That seems like a weird limitation, and again, poor UX.

Finally, we have the “Not shared with third parties”.

It’s so annoying. Why, because neither is Google
It’s the same thing. Google isn’t sharing anything. No advertiser sees any user data, ever.

It’s like when you advertise in a newspaper. You pay the newspaper to display the ad in the right section. But as an advertiser, you have no clue as to who it reaches. You just know it has been targeted right.

That’s how Google Adwords work.

More to the point, tools like Google Analytics work almost exactly like Apple News. It too is anonymous, not associated with people’s Google IDs, uses randomized identifiers, not linked to other Google services, nor is it shared with third parties. 

Granted, you can add aggregated demographic data to this as well, in which case it does link to Google Adwords, but it’s still anonymous, and you have no way to track that on an individual level.

I get so annoyed by this. Apple is promoting itself as the savior of privacy online, bashing Google and others with vaguely misleading statements along the way.

That said, there are genuine concerns about privacy as well.

For instance, there is a real problem around the whole industry of data brokers. These are companies who are buying and selling user data to the highest bidder, from anywhere. For instance, when you go into Target to buy a t-shirt, they will end up knowing your age, income, social status, your food preferences, and sometimes even your medical history. 

Similarly, when I then go into another store a week later, then they suddenly also know that I bought a T-shirt.

That’s not right. That’s terrible! It should be illegal for companies to buy/sell/share their data. (and indeed it is in my country).

If I go into a store, whatever I do and whatever I buy in this store should be kept between the store and me. It is a massive violation of trust when that store sells this information to others. 

That is a real privacy problem.

This also extends to websites. If I visit a newspaper, what I read should not be bought and sold by other companies. That is an interaction purely between me and the newspaper. 

The newspaper can target me all it wants based on the interaction that has taken place between us. But when I then visit another newspaper, they shouldn’t be allowed to know what topics of articles I read elsewhere. 

This is the whole concept of privacy. 

Apple is doing this right because what it tracks is kept within Apple. Which is good. And that is also how Google works. Whatever you do on Google, stays with Google.

But the rest of Apple PR bashing about privacy is just that, PR.

Look at Apple Music, which will be available on iPhone, iPad, Mac, Windows and Android. Here you can create your own playlists, follow artists, like, comment and share things.

The only way they can do that is by linking your actions to your Apple ID. How else would it be able to show you the playlist on your phone that you just created on your Mac? How else would it be able to keep track and notify you across devices when there is an update to something you engage with?

So, Apple is using your data, just like everyone else. As Apple says on their site (about Apple Music)

“Enjoy recommendations handpicked just for you or explore everything they find that’s new and noteworthy in the world of music. It’s all yours.”

“Even with a library this massive, finding the music you’re looking for is easy. The intelligent search engine remembers whether you’re looking in your local library or the Apple Music library, so you get results from the place you expect. You can also browse music you’ve looked for previously, and see what searches are trending.”

”Tell us what you like. Discover something you’ll love. When you tell us the genres and bands you’re into, we’ll bring you more suggestions from our experts who know and love music. They’re out at the big shows and the small gigs, combing scenes to bring you emerging artists and deep cuts, and creating playlists that feel like they’re coming from a friend who knows exactly what you want to hear.”

”The more you listen, the better we hear you. When we make recommendations, we consider what you tell us you like. Whether you love a song or not, your feedback helps our suggestions get better and better. But we also pay attention to what you actually play. So if you’re an EDM fan with a secret affinity for big band music, we’ll find you more stuff that swings. And drops the beat.”

How is this not exactly the same as what Google is doing with their services?

Oh, you say. But Apple isn’t using this to sell advertising. Really? 

Here is the description of ad targeting for the Apple News app:

”Monetization of Apple News Format content is simple with iAd, Apple’s advertising platform. When monetizing with iAd, you’ll have access to iAd’s segmentation capabilities, so your advertisers can reach just the right audience within your content. iAd targeting is accurate and scalable, and based on registration data from hundreds of millions of validated Apple users.”

So, when Apple said that Apple news was anonymous, not associated with Apple ID, uses a random identifier, nor linked to other Apple services, that apparently only applies to all the things that aren’t iAds. Because with iAds, they can accurately target your content to millions of Apple users.

Again, just like Google.

Add that Apple recently announced they will support ad blockers in Safari on the iPhone, thus blocking newspapers from earning money that way. While iAds does work in their own news app... well...

This is why I get so annoyed when I hear Apple’s PR machine talk about privacy. First, we have Tim Cook saying: “They’re gobbling up everything they can learn about you and trying to monetize it. We think that’s wrong. And it’s not the kind of company that Apple wants to be. So we don’t want your data.“

Then they launch two new services; Apple Music and Apple News, both featuring individual targeting, tracking and tailoring. Including integration to iAds.

I call shenanigans. 

Both Apple and Google track what you do. Both companies use that information. And both companies that keep information within themselves, thus ensuring your privacy stays intact. 

There is nothing wrong with that. In fact, as they both show, doing this creates much better products for you and me.

Let’s instead focus on the much more important issue of data brokers, and how data from one site is sold or given to others, thus causing one company to know what you did in another store. 

That is the real issue we should be dealing with. Not how data is used between us and the individual companies that we have chosen to be a part of.
143 comments on original post
1
Andy Brommel's profile photo
 
Apple is doing it client side (read:poorly) and Google is doing it server side (read:cross platform in the cloud). Apple is doing it more privately but much less effectively. Google, the opposite.
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
Another beautifully worded response from one of my favorite public figures/celebrities, Mike Rowe.

(I've copied the text from Facebook in case you don't want to click the link)

Hey Mike

Your constant harping on “work ethic” is growing tiresome. Just because someone’s poor doesn’t mean they’re lazy. The unemployed want to work! And many of those who can’t find work today, didn’t have the benefit of growing up with parents like yours. How can you expect someone with no role model to qualify for one of your scholarships or sign your silly “Sweat Pledge?” Rather than accusi...ng people of not having a work-ethic, why not drop the right-wing propaganda and help them develop one? 

Craig P. 

Hi Craig, and Happy Sunday!

I’m afraid you’ve overestimated the reach of my foundation, as well as my ability to motivate people I’ve never met. For the record, I don’t believe all poor people are lazy, any more than I believe all rich people are greedy. But I can understand why so many do. 

Everyday on the news, liberal pundits and politicians portray the wealthy as greedy, while conservative pundits and politicians portray the poor as lazy. Democrats have become so good at denouncing greed, Republicans now defend it. And Republicans are so good at condemning laziness, Democrats are now denying it even exists. It's a never ending dance that gets more contorted by the day. 

A few weeks ago in Georgetown, President Obama accused Fox News of “perpetuating a false narrative” by consistently calling poor people “lazy.” Fox News denied the President’s accusation, claiming to have only criticized policies, not people. Unfortunately for Fox, The Daily Show has apparently gained access to the Internet, and after a ten-second google-search and a few minutes in the edit bay, John Stewart was on the air with a devastating montage of Fox personnel referring to the unemployed as “sponges,” “leeches,” “freeloaders,” and “mooches.” http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/erik-wemple/wp/2015/05/14/daily-shows-jon-stewart-buries-fox-news-on-coverage-of-poverty-president-obama/

Over the next few days, the echo chamber got very noisy. The Left howled about the bias at Fox and condemned the one-percent, while the Right shrieked about the bias at MSNBC and bemoaned the growing entitlement state. But through all the howling and shrieking, no one said a word about the millions of jobs that American companies are struggling to fill right now. No one talked the fact that most of those jobs don’t require an expensive four-year degree. And no one mentioned the 1.2 trillion dollars of outstanding student loans, or the madness of lending money we don’t have to kids who can’t pay it back, educating them for jobs that no longer exist. 

I started mikeroweWORKS to talk about these issues, and shine a light on a few million good jobs that no one seems excited about. But mostly, I wanted to remind people that real opportunity still exists for those individuals who are willing to work hard, learn a skill, and make a persuasive case for themselves. Sadly, you see my efforts as “right wing propaganda.” But why? Are our differences really political? Or is it something deeper? Something philosophical?

You wrote that, “people want to work.” In my travels, I’ve met a lot of hard-working individuals, and I’ve been singing their praises for the last 12 years. But I’ve seen nothing that would lead me to agree with your generalization. From what I’ve seen of the species, and what I know of myself, most people - given the choice - would prefer NOT to work. In fact, on Dirty Jobs, I saw Help Wanted signs in every state, even at the height of the recession. Is it possible you see the existence of so many unfilled jobs as a challenge to your basic understanding of what makes people tick? 

Last week at a policy conference in Mackinac, I talked to several hiring managers from a few of the largest companies in Michigan. They all told me the same thing - the biggest under reported challenge in finding good help, (aside from the inability to “piss clean,”) is an overwhelming lack of “soft skills.” That’s a polite way of saying that many applicants don’t tuck their shirts in, or pull their pants up, or look you in the eye, or say things like “please” and “thank you.” This is not a Michigan problem - this is a national crisis. We’re churning out a generation of poorly educated people with no skill, no ambition, no guidance, and no realistic expectations of what it means to go to work. 

These are the people you’re talking about Craig, and their number grows everyday. I understand you would like me to help them, but how? I’m not a mentor, and my foundation doesn’t do interventions. Do you really want me to stop rewarding individual work ethic, just because I don’t have the resources to assist those who don’t have any? If I’m unable to help everyone, do you really want me to help no one? 

My goals are modest, and they’ll remain that way. I don’t focus on groups. I focus on individuals who are eager to do whatever it takes to get started. People willing to retool, retrain, and relocate. That doesn’t mean I have no empathy for those less motivated. It just means I’m more inclined to subsidize the cost of training for those who are. That shouldn’t be a partisan position, but if it is, I guess I’ll just have to live with it. 

Mike

PS. The Sweat Pledge wasn’t supposed to be partisan either, but it’s probably annoyed as many people as its inspired. I still sell them for $12, and the money still goes to mikeroweWORKS. You can get one here, even if you’re not applying for a scholarship. http://profoundlydisconnected.com/foundation/poster/

PPS. If you’d like Craig, I’ll autograph one for you!
 
I rarely reshare anything from Facebook, but when Mike Rowe has something to say I tend to spread his good word. 
Hey Mike Your constant harping on “work ethic” is growing tiresome. Just because someone’s poor doesn’t mean they’re lazy. The unemployed want to work!...
2 comments on original post
3
1
Lucas Freeman's profile photo
Add a comment...

Nick OHara

Shared publicly  - 
 
Soon after getting engaged we started talking about when we should start having children. I felt I wasn't ready, and wouldn't be for some time. After more discussions over the coming months, I came to a realization, "I'm not ready for a baby now, but I will be by the time he/she is born". My wife just entered the third trimester of our first child and sent me this article. It's quite a long article, but very much worth the time. 

"Unlike Ann Landers’s survey respondents, I swear I don’t regret it, though sometimes I’m mortified to think about how my 27-year-old self would regard the frazzled, stroller-pushing woman I am now. I try to figure out how to explain myself in a way that would be intelligible to her, but I don’t think I can. The best I can come up with is that before there was one person in the world for whom I would use the word Ya'aburnee, and now there are three. It doesn’t matter that she wouldn’t find this persuasive. If I’d known what having babies would be like I might have attempted it sooner, and I’m so glad I didn’t, because then it wouldn’t be like this."
2
Nick OHara's profile photoAndy Brommel's profile photoAdam Brommel's profile photo
4 comments
 
For me it was the realization that children's needs are relentless, and you are their source of providing, caretaking, and they know it. I'm convinced that children have are like some animals and can sense fear. So when you're frantically trying to solve a baby/child issue they're going to read your emotions. Remain cool and calm when possible. Find an outlet to vent when you need to, because you will. And don't be ashamed of any meltdowns. Because you won't be able to avoid them. Be present in their lives and all will be well. 
Add a comment...
People
Have them in circles
283 people
Sharma Atul (Ajay)'s profile photo
Nemo Cardenas's profile photo
Michael Lindholm's profile photo
Leonard Payne's profile photo
Ida Fay's profile photo
Android Coliseum's profile photo
Wanpool's profile photo
Samantha Campbell's profile photo
Tim OConnor's profile photo
Collections Nick is following
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
  • Clash of Clans
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
West Des Moines, Iowa
Previously
Ames, IA
Links
YouTube
This place rarely disappoints and is exactly what you'd expect from a sports bar and grill. Lots of nice, big TVs showing a variety of sports, and the wait staff has generally been very good, or at least not bad. EDIT: I cannot remember when I wrote that review, but as of early-2014 the place has gone downhill dramatically. Their food is not as good as before, and their wait staff seem like they're unhappy/bitter.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Sometime during mid-2014 the management staff was switched out and the place got noticeably better. Employees were nicer and more on top of things. Bathroom is always clean. Only complaint, it's loud. The really high ceilings seem to amplify the noise of the soda and other drink machines so there's a dull roar in the place at all times.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
It's a local chain with this location "specializing" in pork. I haven't sampled much of the menu, but what I have had was as good as expected. The atmosphere and wait staff are excellent, though it can get a little loud when busy due to its very open nature, so don't plan on private conversations over a meal. Also, I eat here for lunch a few times per month and the food quality is very consistent. Two complaints: 1. The parking lot is very small. It probably fine for dinner, but at lunch the nearby Jimmy Johns is busy and uses up the little extra parking available. 2. Around late-2014 they switched from Heinz to their own ketchup. It's slightly sweeter and I've gotten used to it, but if given the chance I'd have them switch back. More restaurants seem to be doing this so it must be a cost saving measure.
• • •
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
We went here because the famous Maui Revealed guidebook recommended it very highly, and i can see why. Very professional staff, excellent facilities, private beach front to ensure privacy to luau guests, and outstanding food and drinks. Oh, and the show was top notch as well. We even had Miss Hawaii do a hula before the main show as a surprise. More expensive than hotel luau's, but you get a lot more value.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
22 reviews
Map
Map
Map
I walk here for lunch quite frequently. After a few weeks the staff started to recognize me and now they've started making my sandwich as soon as I walk in the door. They're very friendly and good at their job, plus they seem to know how conversational you want to be, not being too talkative or too quiet. Food quality is also been very consistent, only occasionally getting slightly old bread (usually when I get a late lunch after 1:00pm).
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
Great view, but the everything else was over rated. Thankfully we were early and didn't have a wait, but I've heard waits can reach over an hour. Go elsewhere.
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago
I (30) and my wife (28) have stayed here twice together (2011 & 2015) and she stayed here with her family back in 1995. There's a reason for the repeat visits. While the units aren't the most modern looking, they work like newer ones (WiFi steamed HD video quite well). The pool is fine, but kids probably won't like it all that much, but we don't use the pool since the beach is a 10 second walk away. Ultimately, we keep coming back because it's a great value. $300/night for a studio with a full ocean view during peak season is excellent. We love Ka'anapali because of the 2.5 mile long, well groomed beach and the culture of Whaler's Village and nearby Lahaina. Our favorite activities are walking the beach and eating lunch on our balcony watching the whales <1 mile from shore.
• • •
Public - 4 months ago
reviewed 4 months ago