Profile

Cover photo
Nick Benik (HackerCEO)
Works at Harvard Medical School
Attends Autodidactic Polymath
Lives in Boston
1,438 followers|624,474 views
AboutPostsCollectionsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Very informative read! #algorithms #modeling #bigdata
 
Why the #facebook   #algorithm  is doomed to failure 
#Content   #contentstrategy   #contentmarketing  
Another day and another update to Facebook's news algorithm. Facebook claims they use around 100,000 factors to identify the most "relevant" content for users. Yet the constant tweaking and tuning ...
View original post
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Artificial Neural Networks have spurred remarkable recent progress in image classification and speech recognition. But even though these are very useful tools based on well-known mathematical methods, we actually understand surprisingly little of why certain models work and others don’t.

Over on the Google Research blog, we take a look at some simple techniques for peeking inside these networks, yielding a qualitative sense of the level of abstraction that particular layers of neural networks have achieved in their understanding of images. This helps us visualize how neural networks are able to carry out difficult classification tasks, improve network architecture, and check what the network has learned during training. 

It also makes us wonder whether neural networks could become a tool for artists—a new way to remix visual concepts—or perhaps even shed a little light on the roots of the creative process in general.
21 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
A bit edgey but sometimes the truth needs to be stated bluntly.
2
2
Grant Marlenee's profile photoJust In Words's profile photoLisa Borel's profile photoNelson Gutierrez's profile photo
6 comments
 
"Your" "Self" "powered" by "knowledge" is "objective" "science" ???

Is that a joke ???
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
#energy use article that is #funny  as $@!# as well as very informative!
 
I occasionally will write a long article. This article is, I have to say, longer than even what I would write. But it explains a tremendous number of really important things extremely clearly: power production and use, the history of cars, how these things all fit together, and how Tesla is trying to change that. There's no way I could give you a useful short summary, because the point of this article is that, by the time you're done reading it, you'll understand all of the things well enough that you can join in very serious conversations about them.

So don't feel compelled to read this at one sitting -- but this is an article you may want to bookmark, and read bit by bit, because by the time you reach the end, you'll have learned a lot.
109 comments on original post
2
1
Kingsley Idehen's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,438 people
Mudita Manohar's profile photo
Kateryna Artyushkova's profile photo
Jessrelle Pugal's profile photo
Nathalie Surya's profile photo
Christopher Barnes's profile photo
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo's profile photo
calculus videos's profile photo
Buddy Setiawan's profile photo
Le Thanh's profile photo

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Time's Arrow

Yesterday I talked about how time can be symmetrical in physics. For example, a video of billiard balls colliding looks the same whether played forwards or backwards. This would seem to contradict our everyday experience that time flows ever onward in one direction. We can remember yesterday, but not tomorrow, and if we break our favorite coffee mug we can’t simply unbreak it. This unidirectional nature of events is called the arrow of time, and it’s a bit of a mystery.

In classical Newtonian physics, interactions between simple particles is perfectly time symmetric. Where the direction of time appears is through thermodynamics. For example, if you had a room full of air, with all the air molecules bouncing around, it is very unlikely that all the molecules would at one point clump together in one corner of the room. It’s theoretically possible that all the air molecules happen have the right trajectory to reach the corner at about the same time, but it’s extremely unlikely. On the other hand, if you started with a pressurized container of air in the corner and then released the air, the molecules would almost certainly spread evenly throughout the room given a bit of time. If think of these examples as time-reversed siblings of each other, you can see that both are possible, but one is far more probable than the other.

We can express this difference in probability in terms of entropy. The pressure, temperature and volume of the gas in the room is known as its state. Since these are determined by the positions and speeds of all the air molecules in the gas, which is collectively called these the microstate of the gas (the state of all the microscopic particles). For a given state of the gas, there are lots of ways the atoms could be moving and bouncing around. As long as the average motion of all the atoms is about the same, then the pressure, temperature and volume of the gas will be the same. This means there are lots of equivalent microstates for a given state of the gas. The more microstates for a given state of the gas, the greater the entropy of the gas, and the more likely the gas will be found in that state. So the arrow of time can be stated as the direction of increasing entropy. This is often expressed as the second law of thermodynamics, which states that the entropy of a system can never decrease.

In quantum theory the arrow of time can be expressed in other ways. In the simple Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory, a quantum object is in a probabilistic state defined by a wavefunction, which then collapses into a definite state when observed. This collapse of the wavefunction is not reversible, and thus there is a single direction to time. In many ways the Copenhagen interpretation is overly simplistic, but the idea holds in other interpretations as well. For example, in quantum systems left to themselves become more entangled over time. So another way to express the arrow of time is to say that it is in the direction of increasing entanglement.

Of course none of this addresses our most direct experience of time’s arrow, which is that we seem to have a conscious experience of the unidirectional flow of time. It’s so deeply ingrained in our personal experience that we intuitively feel that events occur at a specific “now” even though relativity clearly disproves a cosmic present moment. Just why we have such a strong experience of the arrow of time isn’t clear.

But given time, we might be able to figure it out.
In physics events are often time symmetric, so why is it that time so clearly seems to have a specific direction?
28 comments on original post
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Throwing back a few at the in-laws and watching +Anthony Bourdain​ marathon​ on #CNN. Missing my experience in #Thailand. Beautiful country of 1000 smiles. Note to self. Post pictures of my trip shortly after the whole red shirts vs. yellow shirt unrest. Seriously, VISIT THAILAND! PS. The tourist hustles are only as bad as the hustling going on in NYC - Canal Street... "hey buddy, you want to buy a cheap Rolex?"
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
And so it begins! #bitcoin   #cryptocurrency   #greece  
The world's largest Bitcoin exchanges say they've seen a surge of business from Greece.
3
1
Christian Fernandez's profile photo
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Brain structure differences linked to parrots ability to "speak".
Key structural differences in the brains of parrots explain the birds' ability to imitate sounds and human speech
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
The long read: Judge Victoria Pratt looks defendants in the eye, asks them to write essays about their goals and congratulates them for complying – and she is getting results
1
Add a comment...

Nick Benik (HackerCEO)

Shared publicly  - 
 
Here is an open challenge to +Randall Lee Reetz on #entropy , #informationtheory , and big O complexity of computer algorithms...

What is the relationship between a computer algorithm's best-case, worst-case and average Big O time-complexity with regards to the entropy of the problem's given data.  I recently started exploring this angle of thinking on the topics and in several thought experiments found it generates an interesting bell curve.  

Some breadcrumbs for you to follow...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analysis_of_algorithms
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entropy_(information_theory)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisher_information

As a self-proclaimed expert in science and entropy, can you see what I see?
1
1
Juaquin Anderson's profile photoRandall Lee Reetz's profile photoNick Benik (HackerCEO)'s profile photoBrian Fitzgerald's profile photo
67 comments
 
+Randall Lee Reetz​ states that "[I] want to live forever"...

Someone who is serious about science (like real scientists) rely upon this important thing called EVIDENCE to back up their statements. Please provide evidence that I EVER said I wanted to live forever or just ignore my request and continue to live in your pseudo-world where you delusionally believe you do something vaguely related to scientific pursuits.
Add a comment...
Nick's Collections
People
Have him in circles
1,438 people
Mudita Manohar's profile photo
Kateryna Artyushkova's profile photo
Jessrelle Pugal's profile photo
Nathalie Surya's profile photo
Christopher Barnes's profile photo
Emmanuelle Gutiérrez y Restrepo's profile photo
calculus videos's profile photo
Buddy Setiawan's profile photo
Le Thanh's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Technologist, Researcher, Businessman, Inventor
Employment
  • Harvard Medical School
    Sr. Web 2.0 Software Architect, present
  • Idiopathic Rebel (aka Iconoclast)
    Technologist, Businessman, Inventor, present
  • Liz Claiborne
  • Oracle
  • Colgate-Palmolive
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Boston
Links
Other profiles
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
Autodidact Polymath and Iconoclast
Introduction
I'm a entrepreneurial businessman with many years of experience in Fortune 500 companies as well as several C-level executive and advisory positions at web startups. My primary focus is on Software Architecture and Electrical Engineering. I have invented and hold several patents (internationally) and am well versed in Patent & Copyright law. 

As a polymath and member of American Mensa my working knowledge within the STEM universe is extensive with specific spikes of high expertise. So go ahead and ask me about Carbonic Anhydrase ;) I've managed to have meaningful conversations with specialists in semiconductor physics, cellular biology, medicine/pharma, finance, gunsmithing and many other domains.

I am currently at Harvard Medical School involved in Bioinformatics, Bibliometrics, Social Network Analysis (of the worldwide medical research community), and the Semantic Web.

For fun I research random STEM topics, invent stuff, write my own patents, do photography and, of course, provide consulting and mentoring services.
Bragging rights
American Mensa (Performance IQ in top 0.13% percentile) - Holder of 5 patents with several pending internationally
Education
  • Autodidactic Polymath
    STEM-topics, 1979 - present
    If you aren't learning something new every day then you aren't living... Anything computers and electronics. Enough biomedical knowledge to understand most PubMed articles with the help of Wikipedia. Set and graph theory. A dash of classical and quantum physics theory (quantum computing). Some mechanical engineering (I own a metal lathe, 3-axis mill, and a 3D printer). Law, especially patent and copyright. Psychology. Marketing. Some economic theories. Some chemistry. Blah, blah, blah....
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends, Networking
Other names
Nicholas Benik