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Nicholas Rumas
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Al Brady creates some really awesome biologically inspired planes. He is the designer of the awesome pterodactyl combat jets that will be featured in Bastiaan Koch's movie Is This Heaven. His other vehicle creations are cool too.
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"When the droplets of saltwater sat static on the graphene, they carried an equal charge on both sides. But, when moved across the surface of the graphene, the electrons in the saltwater were desorbed on one end of the graphene and absorbed on the other, generating a measurable voltage along the way. The faster the water moves, the higher the voltage it generates—although the total voltage was still pretty low, about 30 millivolts. A standard AA battery, by comparison, produces about 1.5 volts."
A team of Chinese scientists did an impossible-sounding thing. They created electricity simply by dragging a droplet of saltwater across a layer of graphene. No big fires, no greenhouse gases, no fuss. They created energy with just a miracle material and one of the most plentiful substances on Earth.
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This is happening on Chicago's north shore right now. April 14. I kind of love it.

[Update 10:53 PM] Everything is covered in a nice sticky sheet of snow, the kind that makes the trees and bushes all downSheridan Rd look like a Bob Ross painting. Perfect encore to a crazy winter. 
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"Researchers at Tele Aviv University, however, thought jellyfish could perhaps be the source for highly absorbent and biodegradable material. Their bodies are 90 percent water, yet they don't disintegrate or dissolve in the sea. That's the original idea behind Hydromash, which Cine'al claims is many times more absorbent than paper towels, and which is derived from jellyfish bodies plus nanoparticles for antibacterial properties."
Of the many problems on Earth, here are two: there are too many jellyfish in the seas, and there are too many diapers in our landfills. An Israeli nanotech start-up called Cine'al says it has found the answer to both in Hydromash, a super-absorbent material made from the bodies of jellyfish. But why stop at diapers? Cine'al says jellyfish tampons, paper towels, and medical sponges could all be part of our absorbent future.
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Korea has undergone rapid change over the last century, with Seoul metamorphosing from the first East Asian city to light its royal palace with electricity to arguably the most modern city in the world. Photographer Sungseok Ahn captured change by setting up a screen and projecting the old on top of the new.
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Concept piece by +Sylvain Despretz 
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wow..
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I hope I'm not alone in thinking this is an absolutely rad design. I would so wear this.

+Google Glass photo via +The Verge http://goo.gl/6KDuLh
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We're glad you like our Titanium Collection frames, +Nicholas Rumas. You can see more of our frame designs in this video:
 https://plus.google.com/b/111626127367496192147/+GoogleGlass/posts/WrtiBN6UAKQ
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#McQuarrieMonday - A bustling city center and its inhabitants. 
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A 96-year old Toronto woman is finally moving out of her quaint little house. The story isn't anything out of the ordinary—until you realize that she's lived there for 72 years and apparently hasn't redecorated once. Oh, and she has amazing taste.
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Story
Introduction
My name is Nick.
Bragging rights
Got my picture in Nintendo Power.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Relationship
Married