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Most books about wildlife conservation must find a precarious balance between hope and despair. Here are two that teeter in opposite directions, while telling remarkably parallel stories.
From saving the migratory paths of endangered knots to establishing new colonies of puffins, two new books show the tough challenges bird conservationists face
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Officials said Brazil plans to restore 12 million hectares of forest by 2030.
The country has committed to ending illegal deforestation by 2030, as it partners with the US on fighting climate change
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平手 深樹親(ALPHANEODESIGN)'s profile photoJessica Meyer's profile photoRob Jongschaap's profile photoA.D. P.'s profile photo
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I hope they do it!
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Health-hackers: The people building apps to manage their illness: http://ow.ly/P21JF
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Just the thing to beat the heat - a silver coat.
Unique triangular hairs help keep Saharan silver ants cool at 70°C by manipulating the physics of light
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Florian Jouanel's profile photoL-Renaud T. Drev's profile photoA Freeman's profile photoHenry Johnson's profile photo
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Looks like gold not silver.
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Greased lightning: behind the scenes of the first-ever all-electric racing series, the Formula E.
Behind the scenes at Formula E – the future of motor racing? 18:12 30 June 2015. Motor racing doesn't need to be loud. This weekend, the inaugural season of the Formula E championship, the world's first all-electric racing series, came to a close with the final two races at Battersea Park in ...
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Going to these places in 2015? Best pack some mosquito repellent.
Cases of yellow fever, chikungunya and dengue fever might rise as the ideal conditions for the mosquitoes that can carry the viruses become more widespread
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Tukai Jude's profile photoDecay-Proof Record Scroll's profile photoMoney Press News Business Finance Personal's profile photo平手 深樹親(ALPHANEODESIGN)'s profile photo
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+Tukai Jude the CO2 we exhale is another factor. Supposedly they're also drawn to the color blue as it resembles water they can breed in, so avoid blue articles of clothing. 
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Men: a bout of the flu can affect your sperm production.
Human semen contains mystery round cells - new research confirms most are immature sperm that fail to develop a tail, and links their formation to infections like flu
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Good thing i haven't had the flu since 2007. Lol!
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This wasn't how it was meant to be.
Digital distribution was supposed to bring artists and audiences closer and cut out the middlemen. It hasn't worked out like that
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Could the body's self-defence mechanism be involved in Alzheimer's? http://ow.ly/OZmCL
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The Supreme Court's decision didn't declare sexual orientation a "suspect class" under the law, which would have given it the same protection as race.
The Supreme Court ruled in favour of same-sex marriage, but didn't declare sexual orientation a 'suspect class', which would give it the same protection as race
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In the coming weeks, we can expect Oklahoma and perhaps other states to again schedule executions involving midazolam.
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I'd still like to see a death penalty in which the execution has option to make it consistent with they way the victim was murdered. Decades of appeals and the quick and easy execution is not much of a deterrent. Maybe if the execution can be the same as the way a life was taken, fewer deaths would happen. I think maybe that possibility might speak to the "inner coward" of some killers. the punishment would be no more "cruel and unusual " than the way the victims life was taken. I wouldn't have a problem with "just as" cruel and unusual. 
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It is a relief to see that the pseudoscientific gobbledygook deployed against fracking has not prevailed, says Paul Younger
Opencast coal mines were once routinely delayed by local councils amid unfounded health concerns. The same is happening with fracking, warns Paul Younger
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