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Neville Bezzina
Works at InboundMuse
Attended Sheffield Hallam University
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Neville Bezzina

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+Stéphane Hamel It was a really inspiring chat! 
 
I just had a great conversation with +Neville Bezzina at +InboundMuse and I think they are onto something very interesting.

http://inboundmuse.com/why-marketers-struggle-with-analytics/
Fellow marketer: lend me your ears and imagine this. It's the low season: website sales are down, traffic is at a flat-line, and ad budgets maximised. We're reacting by testing and tweaking, but can't prove our actions are impacting anything. Whether it's the boss or the client, ...
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Who are you? My name is Dan Shipper. I'm 22 and I'm a senior at UPenn majoring in philosophy. I run a company called Firefly. We've been around for about year, and in that time we've bootstrapped our way to well into the 6-figures in revenue, with over 5000 customers.
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I don't post SEO/search/webmaster videos here very often, because this is my personal G+ account, but this is an in-depth (8 minute!) video that explains some of the criteria we use when we decide whether a link is paid or not. Roughly, here are some of the important questions we ask:
- What is the value of the gift, product, or service?
- How close is the gift, product, or service to actual money?
- Is it an outright gift or a loan?
- Who is the intended audience?
- Is the intent of the gift to get links?
- Would the gift be a surprise to third party?

My guess is that anyone who has been involved with SEO for a while would intuitively understand these criteria, but it's helpful to clarify some of the questions we ask. Bear in mind that well over 99% of the time, paid links that pass PageRank are abundantly clear--because actual money is changing hands--plus we reserve the right to adapt our criteria when we see new types of spam or abuse.
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Neville Bezzina

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Most expensive Bottle of Cognac In the World : Croizet Cognac Leonie 1858 = $156,760
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Neville Bezzina

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Neville Bezzina

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In the battle for digital dominance, victory depends on being the first to map every last place on the globe. It's as hard as it sounds.
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+wrenthereaper recently published a visually exciting and interesting take on the world created by JK Rowling. A collaboration with +CorridorDigital and +YouTube Next Programs. Share! #harrypotter #shortfilm  
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Neville Bezzina

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The Key Questions You Should Always Ask to Avoid Wasting Everyone’s Time (Including Yours).
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Important knowledge
 
How to Sneeze In 10 Languages by James Chapman

So apparently, deaf people sneeze silently. And this article says the sneeze sounds we make are just cultural habits and we don’t even need them.

http://bit.ly/1ae4KKL
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I think I can safely say I was using online databases before almost any of the rest of you were. I was using NASA RECON, which was the ancestor of DIALOG and LexisNexis, in the early 80s, OCLC in the late 70s, and Archie, Gopher, & WAIS as each made their appearances on the pre-Web Internet. But, this is where I started, and part of me still misses it.
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The universe is alive
 
Fire in the Sky

Sometimes in astronomy a simple question can have a complex answer.  For example, why is the night sky dark?  You might think that has an easy answer:  the sky is dark because the stars are very far away and appear dim.  It’s obvious why the sky is dark, right?

Except it isn’t.  

In actuality, stars are quite bright.  Many of them are as bright or brighter than the Sun.  They only appear dim because they are far away.  But there is an interesting catch.  The apparent brightness of a star decreases with distance according to the inverse square law.  In other words, it two stars have the same absolute brightness, but star A is twice as far away as star B, then star A will appear one fourth as bright.  The catch is that the apparent size of a star also decreases according to the inverse square law.  This means that while a distant star appears dimmer, it also appears equally smaller.  Thus you could argue that a star appears as bright as the Sun, but just over a tiny area.

So if the universe is an endless sea of stars, then if we look in any direction in the night sky we will see a star.  That star may be very, very far away, but in that one precise direction the night sky is as bright as the Sun.  Of course for an endless sea of stars, that should be true for any direction we look.  If the universe goes on forever, then the night sky should be a blaze of light, as seen in the animation below.

This is often known as Olbers’ Paradox, after Heinrich Olbers, who popularized the question in the early 1800s.  For about a hundred years it was a real mystery.  

Now you might think the answer to this paradox lies in the fact that the universe is not an endless sea of stars.  Stars are clumped into galaxies, after all.  But this doesn’t solve the paradox.  Instead it simply pushes the paradox from stars to galaxies.  The apparent brightness and size of galaxies follows the same inverse square law, so an endless sea of galaxies would also produce a blazing bright sky.

What about the fact that there is lots of dust in the universe.  The dust doesn’t give off light like stars, so that should solve the paradox.  It doesn’t because the dust would absorb light and heat, so if the dustless regions of sky were as bright as the Sun, the dust would be heated to the same temperature and would therefore give off just as much light as the stars.

Olbers’ paradox makes two assumptions about the universe.  The first is that it goes on forever, the second is that it has always existed.  While the first assumption might be true, the second assumption is not true.  The universe is expanding, and it began about 13.77 billion years ago with the big bang.  Since the universe has a finite age, and light travels at a finite speed, there is a limit to how far away visible stars and galaxies can be.  Light from more distant galaxies simply hasn’t had time to reach us.  Also, since the universe is expanding, the light from distant stars is redshifted, making them appear cooler than they actually are.  So the night sky is dark precisely because the universe is expanding and has a finite age.

When you look at a dark night sky, you are seeing evidence of the big bang.


Image:  Wikipedia.  Kmarinas86. (http://goo.gl/Bn5BP)
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In his circles
913 people
Have him in circles
439 people
Daniel Spiteri's profile photo
Sonia Vella Zarb's profile photo
Mark Galea's profile photo
Stephen John Cremona's profile photo
Michael Zimmermann's profile photo
Michael Bonnici's profile photo
Marcus Haeusers's profile photo
Miki Marin's profile photo
Shelia Kelly's profile photo
Work
Occupation
CMO
Skills
Digital Analytics / Inbound Marketing
Employment
  • InboundMuse
    CMO, present
  • Air Malta
    Web Content Management Executive, 2013 - 2013
  • Sense of Nature
    Digital PR, 2011 - 2012
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Tagline
Digital Analytics/Inbound Marketing Entrepreneur
Bragging rights
Awarded the 2011 Scholarship by ESU Malta to participate in the International Relations Conference 2011 held at Mansfield College, Oxford University
Education
  • Sheffield Hallam University
    Online Communications, 2012 - 2013
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