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Detecting Eye Diseases With Help of a Smartphone

Researchers at the Medical and Surgical Center for Retina developed software that detects eye diseases such as diabetic macular edema using a smartphone. The system is aimed at general physicians who could detect the condition and refer the patient to a specialist.

#vision   #technology  
Researchers have developed software for smartphones that can detect eye diseases, such as diabetic macular edema.
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Coach G Moore's profile photoiPan Darius's profile photoAnita Dehghani's profile photoS Droz's profile photo
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so inspirational
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Challenge to Traditional Theories About How the Brain Processes Actions

New research by Jason Gallivan and Randy Flanagan suggests that when deciding which of several possible actions to perform, the human brain plans multiple actions simultaneously prior to selecting one of them to execute.

The research is in Nature Communications. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #science  
According to a new study, the brain plans multiple actions simultaneously prior to selecting one action to execute.
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Daniel Deilgat's profile photoAnita Dehghani's profile photoTiago Pereira Rodrigues's profile photoThomas Strimbu's profile photo
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Lol
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Sniffing Out How Our Sense of Smell Evolved

A group of scientists led by Dr Kara Hoover of the University of Alaska Fairbanks and including Professor Matthew Cobb of The University of Manchester, has studied how our sense of smell has evolved, and has even reconstructed how a long-extinct human relative would have been able to smell.

The research is in Chemical Senses. (full access paywall)

#genetics   #evolution  
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magulater1's profile photoGordon Robson's profile photoS Droz's profile photoJuan Jasso Jprotv (Jassotv)'s profile photo
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I can smell pig, what's the big deal?
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Walking in Nature Could Reduce Depression Risk

Study finds that walking in nature yields measurable mental benefits and may reduce risk of depression.

The research is in PNAS. (full access paywall)

#psychology   #nature   #depression  
Feeling depressed? Take a stroll in nature. Researchers report walking in nature can lower the risk of depression.
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Hardyal Sehrawat's profile photodaniel barba's profile photoJon Mason's profile photoRaoul Schweinfurther's profile photo
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So pretty
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Microglia May Be a Potential Therapeutic Target for Blinding Eye Disease

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/microglia-retinitis-pigmentosa-2188/.

A new study by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) shows that they also accelerate damage wrought by blinding eye disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa. NEI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

The research is in EMBO Molecular Medicine. (full open access)

Research: "Microglial phagocytosis of living photoreceptors contributes to inherited retinal degeneration" by Lian Zhao, Matthew K Zabel, Xu Wang, Wenxin Ma, Parth Shah, Robert N Fariss, Haohua Qian, Christopher N Parkhurst, Wen‐Biao Gan, and Wai T Wong in EMBO Molecular Medicine doi:10.15252/emmm.201505298

Image: A microglial cell (green) extends spider-like arms to capture and consume rod photoreceptor cells (blue). Image credit: Dr. Wai T. Wong, National Eye Institute.

#microglia   #vision   #neuroscience  
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Ana Gabriela Ledo's profile photoCoral Orchids's profile photoPin's profile photoBrandy Willard's profile photo
 
It is.
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Cortisol Reinforces Traumatic Memories

Stress hormone takes effect while people retrieve and reconsolidate emotional memories.

The research is in Neuropsychopharmacology. (full access paywall)

#psychology   #ptsd  
According to a new study, cortisol strengthens traumatic memories, both when the memory is formed and when it is reconsolidated.
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Chester Hoehn's profile photoCar nvg Vicen dgt's profile photoM.nallaiah Kishor's profile photoCoral Orchids's profile photo
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That's why cortisone injections aren't too great and should not be used alot.
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REM Sleep Converts Waking Experiences into Lasting Memories in Developing Brain

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/rem-sleep-neurodevelopment-memories-2195/.

Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains reports a new study from Washington State University Spokane.

The research is in Science Advances. (full access paywall)

Research: "Rapid eye movement sleep promotes cortical plasticity in the developing brain" by Michelle C. Dumoulin Bridi, Sara J. Aton, Julie Seibt, Leslie Renouard, Tammi Coleman and Marcos G. Frank in Science Advances doi:10.1126/sciadv.1500105

Image: The study suggests that during these periods, REM sleep helps growing brains adjust the strength or number of their neuronal connections to match the input they receive from their environment The image is for illustrative purposes only. Image credit: NeuroscienceNews.com.

#memory   #sleep   #neuroscience  
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+Neuroscience News Yes, by clicking on the "abstract" apparently. No link associated with the DOI now but that is OK. It appears that I got to the paper. Thanks. 
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New Clues to the Evolution of the Primate Brain

The brain hidden inside the oldest known Old World monkey skull has been visualized for the first time. The creature’s tiny but remarkably wrinkled brain supports the idea that brain complexity can evolve before brain size in the primate family tree.

The research is in Nature Communications. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #evolution  
Researchers have been able to visualize the brain hidden inside the skull of Victoriapithecus, the oldest known Old World monkey and.
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Tiago Pereira Rodrigues's profile photoSwati Popli's profile photodaniel barba's profile photolady luc's profile photo
 
I know that skull.  It belongs to the Ex-CEO of a company I worked for in San Diego.
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How the Brain Reconstructs Past Events

A new study shows that when someone tries to remember one aspect of an event, such as who they met yesterday, the representation of the entire event can be reactivated in the brain, including incidental information such as where they were and what they did.

The research is in Nature Communications. (full open access)

#neuroscience   #memory  
A new study reports that when someone tries to remember one aspect of an event, the representation of the entire event can be activated in the brain.
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Pin's profile photolady luc's profile photoJon Mason's profile photoelice yam's profile photo
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+john cash yes.
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Regenerating Corticospinal Tract Axons

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/corticospinal-axon-regeneration-paralysis-2189/.

Researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have found a way to stimulate the growth of axons, which may spell the dawn of a new beginning on chronic SCI treatments.

The research is in Journal of Neuroscience. (full access paywall)

Research: "Pten Deletion Promotes Regrowth of Corticospinal Tract Axons 1 Year after Spinal Cord Injury" by Kaimeng Du, Susu Zheng, Qian Zhang, Songshan Li, Xin Gao, Juan Wang, Liwen Jiang, and Kai Liu in Journal of Neuroscience doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3637-14.2015

Image: This sagittal section shows the regeneration of mouse corticospinal tract axons (red) 7 months after Pten deletion was initiated in motor cortex. Pten deletion was initiated 1 year after spinal cord injury in this mouse. Green labels glial fibrillary acidic protein. Image credit: Division of Life Science, HKUST.

#neurology   #paralysis   #axons  
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lady luc's profile photoCar nvg Vicen dgt's profile photoBenny Tam's profile photoSamantha Pearl's profile photo
 
Tihs is highly improbable,neutrons would burst at that velocity,making for too much boyancy,leaving you with nothing.
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Prion-Like Proteins Maintain Long-Term Memories

Full article at http://neurosciencenews.com/CPEB3-prions-long-term-memory-2187/.

Research from Eric Kandel’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has uncovered further evidence of a system in the brain that persistently maintains memories for long periods of time. And paradoxically, it works in the same way as mechanisms that cause mad cow disease, kuru, and other degenerative brain diseases.

The research is in Neuron and Cell Reports. (full access paywall and full open access)

Research: "The Persistence of Hippocampal-based Memory Requires Protein Synthesis Mediated by the Prion-like Protein CPEB3" by Eric Kandel, Luana Fioriti, Cory Myers, Yan-You Huang, Xiang Li, Joseph Stephan, Pierre Trifilieff, Stelios Kosmidis, Bettina Drisaldi, and Elias Pavlopoulos in Neuron doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2015.05.021 

Image: Memories are stored for the long-term with the help of prion-like proteins called CPEB. CPEB prions aggregate and maintain synapses that recorded the memory ["spines" in the bottom image]. When CPEB prions are not present or are inactivated, the synapses collapse and the memory fades [see upper image].  Image credit:  Lab of David Sulzer, PhD, Columbia University Medical Center.

#neuroscience   #memory  
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Denys Carlos's profile photoMariano Ortega's profile photoRavi Shastry's profile photoelice yam's profile photo
 
Thanks for this reference. Z
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Researchers Discover New Epigenetic Mecahnism in Brain Cells

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered that histones are steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life - a process which helps to switch genes on and off.

The research is in Neuron. (full access paywall)

#neuroscience   #epigenetics  
A new study reports histones are steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life.
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Quantum Paradigm's profile photoCar nvg Vicen dgt's profile photoManuel Saint-Victor's profile photoVivekananda Baindoor Rao's profile photo
 
Nice, i had decided for no comment till they prove soundness.

i would quote Holy Quran as,

Dont WE fix (anything) by first (or earlier) creation? Rather they are in veil (of deception) about modern creation. 50-15
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