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Naveen Thakur
Works at Aimia
Attended Kings College London
Lived in Pinner, London
46 followers|130,351 views
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Naveen Thakur

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Following the last four years building products in an agile fashion, I have a lot of sympathy for this point of view...
Agile authors tell us that we can build systems one feature at a time. Can we?
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Naveen Thakur

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Coqdoc LATEX package...
For TeXStudio to convert coqdoc Latex to pdf, you'll need to install the 'preprint' package that is required by the 'usepackage{coqdoc}' command.
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Naveen Thakur

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Emacs + Proof General + Coq + Windows (for beginners)
I eventually managed to get this working. Here are some quick pointers if you're in a hurry. Use the release version not the beta of Coq (8.4 as of this post). The beta (8.5) caused a couple of errors on my system. First, it spat out Unicode character codes...
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Naveen Thakur

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Fascinating look into 'why Turing is famous...and not Church etc?'
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Wonderful simplicity...
 
Modern Eco-Friendly Home in Castelnovo di Sotto, Italy

Submit a project http://buff.ly/1xw0bSH
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Been using this for years...essential add-on if you rely on Chrome...
Manage Your Browser Sessions
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Linguistics at Google scale...
 

"The krumpets gnorked the koof with a shlap"

While this sentence may not make much sense, we bet you could infer quite a lot from its structure.  For example, perhaps you would be able to guess that group of something called a “krumpet” did something called "gnorking" to something called a "koof", and that they did so with a "shlap".

This is because sentences in languages such as English have structure. This structure is called syntax, and knowing the syntax of a sentence is a step towards understanding its meaning. The process of taking a sentence and transforming it into a syntactic structure is called parsing. At Google, we parse a lot of text every day, in order to better understand it and be able to provide better results and services in many of our products.

There are many kinds of syntactic representations (such as sentence diagramming, http://goo.gl/UxnsS), and at Google, we've been focused on a certain type of syntactic representation called "dependency trees". Dependency-trees representation is centered around words and the relations between them. Each word in a sentence can either modify or be modified by other words. The various modifications can be represented as a tree, in which each node is a word.

This property by which you could infer the structure of the sentence based on various hints, without knowing the actual meaning of the words, is very useful. For one, it suggests that a even computer could do a reasonable job at such an analysis, and indeed it can! While still not perfect, parsing algorithms these days can analyze sentences with impressive speed and accuracy. For instance, our parser correctly analyzes the made-up sentence at the beginning of this post.

Today, Google announces the release of a very large dataset of counted dependency tree fragments from the English Books Corpus. This resource will help researchers, among other things, to model the meaning of English words over time and create better natural-language analysis tools. The resource is based on information derived from a syntactic analysis of the text of millions of English books. 

To learn more, visit the Google Research Blog, linked below. 
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Particularly interesting given the release of the (albeit fantastical) film...
 
Alan Turning's school reports.

Maths: "Works well. He is still very untidy. He must try to improve in this respect." [Maybe he was writing in code?]

Maths: "Very good. He has considerable powers of reasoning and should do well if he can quicken up a little and improve his style." [A little slow?]

Maths: "A very good term’s work, but his style is dreadful and his paper always dirty." [You know this whole untidiness thing isn't fitting a stereotype].

"Not very good. He spends a good deal of time apparently in investigations in advanced mathematics to the neglect of his elementary work. A sound ground work is essential in any subject. His work is dirty."

"Easily the best mathematician in the set. His position is caused by untidiness and carelessness due largely to impatience to let on something great as soon as he has seen his way through a problem." [Teacher finally started to get a clue]

"His work on Higher Certificate papers shows distinct promise, but he must realise that ability to put a neat & tidy solution on paper – intelligible & legible – is necessary for a first-rate mathematician." [It is. I don't know any mathematicians who aren't neat]


http://alexbellos.com/?p=1674
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Naveen Thakur

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Cheat sheets for learning basic music theory...
 
Music Theory for Musicians and Normal People. Series of cheat-sheet-style PDFs covering pitch, rhythm, and meter notation, beaming, the major scale, key signatures, the circle of fifths, diatonic intervals, perfect intervals, imperfect intervals, analyzing & writing intervals, minor scales, diatonic harmony, triads, triads in inversion, figured bass, triads within tonality, part-writing vertical rules, horizontal rules, using inversions, melodic minor, harmonic cadences, harmonic progression, diatonic common chord modulation, non-harmonic tones, suspensions, diatonic seventh chords, the dominant seventh, extended harmonies, motivic development, binary form, ternary form, sonata allegro form, chromatic harmony, altered chords, borrowed chords, the Neapolitan six, secondary dominants, augmented sixth chords, altered and enharmonic modulation, secondary subdominants, romantic era techniques, sixteenth century counterpoint, species counterpoint melody, and modern modes, with more to come.
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It's been great fun this Dec...
Use Google Santa Tracker to follow Santa Claus on Google Maps as he makes his journey around the world.
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Naveen Thakur

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Fascinating but little known tale about the troubled first space-walk...
How the first human to take steps in outer space nearly didn't return to Earth
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Today, for a lucky few, Northolt is London’s most convenient and exclusive airport. Used by royalty and heads of state, it's also open for private jets. We go behind the scenes to find out what makes it work.
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People
In his circles
41 people
Have him in circles
46 people
Natasha Patel's profile photo
Graham Marr's profile photo
Brett Mackay's profile photo
Jacob Surland's profile photo
Jasvir Singh's profile photo
wijaya Valentino's profile photo
nadeemrafiqe khokhar's profile photo
Les KLEIN's profile photo
Eugene Clark's profile photo
Education
  • Kings College London
    Mathematical Physics and Astrophysics
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Male
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IT, mathematics, finance, marketing, architecture.
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2 wonderful kids and amazing wife
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Chief Architect, Aimia
Employment
  • Aimia
    Chief Architect, 2007 - present
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Pinner, London
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Quick and fresh.
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
Great starters. Unusual cocktails and good mains. Family friendly and a mature crowd. Try the "Birthday Cocktail" if you're feeling brave!
Food: Very GoodDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - a year ago
reviewed a year ago
It's a relaxing and friendly place. We always find the waiters remember our favourite drinks and are always ready to suggest something different. Basically, don't go expecting a Michelin star experience! It's a local bar/restaurant that caters for its regulars and their tastes.
Food: Very GoodDecor: GoodService: Very Good
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
4 reviews
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Another visit with great cocktails and food!
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago