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Nate Lanxon
2,511 followers -
Editor of Wired.co.uk, host of Wired UK Podcast, tech journalist, games expert, heavy metal enthusiast, Japanophile, lover of teas
Editor of Wired.co.uk, host of Wired UK Podcast, tech journalist, games expert, heavy metal enthusiast, Japanophile, lover of teas

2,511 followers
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I have a new website! www.natelanxon.com has my current bio, email and contact details, blog and other information.

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Me
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cat's head, where is your head?? ,,Lol!Lol!haha
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Gorgeous.
Shiodome district of Tokyo.
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New episode! Wired.co.uk Podcast 132: BBC axes 3D, paper cycle helmets, UK hunts aliens

Listen herehttp://www.wired.co.uk/podcast/episode-132 *MP3 link*: http://d10x3fy7puydyz.cloudfront.net/17332/wired/podcast/episode-132.mp3
RSS feedhttp://www.wired.co.uk/podcast/rss

Final Fantasy VII added to Steam, and Vine adds a channel to its app just for Cats. Today is a great day to be a nerd.

Great news: 'The Net' has been added to Netflix. Daft as it sounds, this film used to get me very excited about the promise of the web.

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Farewell!

Going to Google Reader and getting a 404 page is like going to a childhood favourite theme park and seeing it full of corpses. Sad times. 

I still remember the day I switched from iGoogle to Google Reader. It was like taking training wheels off a bike and realising that not only did you not fall over, you went further, and you went faster.

That said, I've enjoyed using Feedly more in two days than I've felt like I enjoyed Google Reader at all in the last year. I've suffered real RSS fatigue, where "mark all as read" felt like some sort of weird drug to combat addiction, setting off signals in my brain akin to pleasure and relief. 

That was a bit dramatic. I only loaded G+ to post a picture of a cat sitting on a donkey.
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And so it begins...

Bye, Reader

It's still a little baffling that Google chose Reader as next for the chopping block. Although the company claimed that usage had declined, its clear that millions of people still used the product. Millions more probably would have if Google invested in redesigning its antiquated interface, and the vast knowledge the company would gain from anonymously monitoring what people are reading most could've provided a great service for other Google products, such as suggested reads within Google+ or even Google News.

On the other hand, this could be seen as Google doing a favour to the world's developers. The demise of a news-organising behemoth like Reader could (and seems to be doing) spark a surge of creativity in the world of article consumption services. Perhaps we'll look back on this week and thank Google for doing us all a favour.
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