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"Our project aims to understand how organisms such as lichens can not only survive but [also] diversify in the world's driest desert," says grantee David Stanton. See what he has to say about researching these unique species in a Chilean desert.
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The sand is very prolific, has a lot of minerals.
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Wildlife managers in Yellowstone National Park recently euthanized a mother bear after she killed a man and injured two other tourists. Now, officials are faced with an equally tragic dilemma: what to do with her three orphaned cubs.
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Ch ch c 
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Photo of the Day: At sunset in Scotland, #YourShot member Grant Glendinning captured the changing light as it washed over the Rattray Head lighthouse. #photography
Sunset surrounds Scotland’s Rattray Head lighthouse in this National Geographic Photo of the Day.
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Oh! Our beautiful Earth !! 
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Friday Fact: Turtles lived on Earth before dinosaurs did.
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+Zeineb Messaoudi​ Not really, Dinosaurs branched off evolutionarily from early reptiles, which were already here on earth. Then birds branched off from a set of dinosaurs.
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In a last-ditch effort to save the species, the Cincinnati Zoo has announced it is sending its male rhino, Harapan—the last Sumatran rhino left in the United States—to Sumatra in hopes of finding him a mate.
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Harapan may not need to travel that far.
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From desert sands to mountain tops, our canine best friends will follow us just about anywhere. Take a look at these adventurous dogs and their humans, as captured by our talented #YourShot community.
See photos of adventure dogs submitted to National Geographic by users like you.
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amigos a toda prova
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Scientists have long puzzled over how dung beetles manage to navigate while rolling their poop balls—but a new study has finally shed some light on the dung dilemma.
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Oldtimer G.P.S.!
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Though California is in the midst of a record breaking, historic drought, olive trees in the state are thriving. Find out why. #FutureofFood
California is in the middle of a historic drought, but nearly half a million olive trees are thriving in the state. What’s more, the trees have been planted on land previously used to grow crops th...
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had me at olive
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The world's oceans are, on average, about eight inches (20 centimeters) higher than a century ago—but how much higher will they rise?
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+Steven Rego the ice in the glass is an inaccurate experiment which absolutely cannot be used to predict how melting glaciers will affect sea levels because the ice in the glass only takes into account ice which is already in the water, not ice in land, unlike the real world scenario in which most of Antarctica is land covered by an ice sheet, and a lot of Canada and Alaska and other places in the Arctic as well. Therefore, if that ice melts the sea levels will rise because they weren't already displaced by the ice and instead would be like adding a lot of extra water to it, which, in terms of the argument here, renders the ice cube experiment completely useless, irrelevant, and an absolute waste of time which cannot be used to argue both for or against climate change.
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Ocean temperatures are steadily increasing, yet our understanding of how this affects individual ecosystems is largely unknown. Check out how one project is using the power of citizen science and crowdsourcing to measure ocean temperatures worldwide.
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Beautiful!!
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Photo of the Day: In the western United Arab Emirates, #YourShot member Mario Cardenas came across the remains of an Arabian oryx. #photography
Men on a camel pass an Arabian oryx skull in the Abu Dhabi desert in this National Geographic Photo of the Day.
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Cool photo!
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A crew of divers, surfers, and ecologists are sailing down the beautiful Pacific coast of Central America. Follow along as they combine adventure with environmental research and collect water samples for Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation's Microplastics project.
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That had to hurt (picture)..
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Since 1888, we've traveled the Earth, sharing its amazing stories with each new generation.