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Chandra Flashback of the Day – 3C321: Black Hole Fires at Neighboring Galaxy 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/3c321/
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Maria Thomas's profile photoDatta K. Kirde's profile photo
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LIGHT: Beyond the Bulb – Image of the Day!
Blueline Snapper
The fish themselves do not possess the color we see in this image. Rather, the color is in the light that shines onto them from the Sun above. 
http://lightexhibit.org/bio_image26.html

Image Credit: Georgette Douwma/Science Photo Library

#IYL2015 #LBTB
This spectacularly colorful school of fish contains blueline snappers, a species native to certain parts of the Indian Ocean. The fish themselves do not possess the color we see in this image. Rather, the color is in the light that shines onto them from the Sun above. The atoms and molecules in ...
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Space-time Foam: NASA Telescopes Set Limits on Space-time Quantum Foam
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2015/quantum/

Observations of distant quasars in X-rays from Chandra (top six images) and gamma-ray telescopes are helping scientists test the nature of space-time at extremely small scales. This artistʼs illustration (bottom) depicts how the foamy structure of space-time may appear, showing tiny bubbles quadrillions of times smaller than the nucleus of an atom that are constantly fluctuating and last for only infinitesimal fractions of a second. 

(Credit: NASA/CXC/FIT/E.Perlman et al, Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss) 
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MUHAMMED İSA's profile photoGreatHeathenArmy I's profile photoCarlos Eugênio Munhoz's profile photoAstronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photo
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Quadrillions. That is incredibly eye opening!
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – G327.1-1.1: Pushing the Envelope 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/g327/
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Glossary Term of the Day!
High-mass Star: A star that is about 8 or more times the mass of the Sun.
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Question of the Day! 
Where in the galaxy would you expect to find Type I and Type II supernovas?

Answer!
The two basic types of supernovas are Type Ia and Type II. Other types, such as Types Ib and Ic, are unusual supernovas that have most of the properties of type II supernovas.

Type Ia are believed to be triggered by a large transfer of mass from a companion star onto a white dwarf that pushes the white dwarf over the Chandrasekhar limit. A thermonuclear explosion follows, blowing the entire star apart, and sending material rich in iron and other products of the explosion rushing out into space. Since a white dwarf is involved, Type Ia supernovas are expected to be found among old star systems, such as globular clusters, the central bulges of galaxies and elliptical galaxies.

Type II supernovas are thought to result from the collapse of a massive star (ten or more times as massive as the Sun) that has reached the end of the red giant stage of evolution, and formed an iron core. The core collapses under the weight of the outer layers of the star. A neutron star is formed, lots of neutrinos and other radiation is emitted, and everything except the neutron star is blown away. Since massive stars are involved, Type II supernovas are found in the spiral arms and other star-forming regions of spiral and disk galaxies, which have lots of gas and dust for the formation of new stars.
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Astronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photojerald obasha's profile photoN Torrez's profile photoBrother Flagg's profile photo
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SS equivalent to a VLS Supernova, on Earth, is Yellowstone- which is one of a Series of Blasts from OR ID Border (Rhyolitic extrusions) occurring on a million year +_ scale! Supernovae may have a Cycle also (earliest is Chinese-reported 1054AD). Tabulation shown in:
Porogle.blogspot.com CONJECTURE! 
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – 3C321: Black Hole Fires at Neighboring Galaxy 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2007/3c321/
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Pijush Banerjee's profile photoDaryl Tabogoc's profile photo
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Lunch with the Stars! Sagittarius A*: NASA's Chandra Finds Milky Way's Black Hole May be Grazing on Asteroids, for lunch time reading: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2012/sgra/
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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Astronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photoJoão Marcos Brandet's profile photo
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Space-time Foam: NASA Telescopes Set Limits on Space-time Quantum Foam
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2015/quantum/

Observations of distant quasars in X-rays from Chandra (top six images) and gamma-ray telescopes are helping scientists test the nature of space-time at extremely small scales. This artistʼs illustration (bottom) depicts how the foamy structure of space-time may appear, showing tiny bubbles quadrillions of times smaller than the nucleus of an atom that are constantly fluctuating and last for only infinitesimal fractions of a second. 

(Credit: NASA/CXC/FIT/E.Perlman et al, Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss) 
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – G327.1-1.1: Pushing the Envelope 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/g327/
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Marcos Andrés Barros Ketterer's profile photoeleftheria doussi's profile photoDEREK PRESTON's profile photoDatta K. Kirde's profile photo
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Nice
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LIGHT: Beyond the Bulb – Image of the Day!
Micrograph Of Algae and Moss
The technique used to enhance the contrast in this photomicrograph is called "darkfield." To do this, a photographer excludes some of the light that enters the field of view so that very little light falls on anything except the specimen.
http://lightexhibit.org/bio_image39.html

Image Credit: Marek Mís

#IYL2015 #LBTB
This photomicrograph—an image taken through a microscope and captured with a camera—features an up close look at green algae and moss. The technique used to enhance the contrast in this photomicrograph is called "darkfield." To do this, a photographer excludes some of the light that enters the ...
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Lunch with the Stars! 47 Tucanae: Probing Extreme Matter Through Observations of Neutron Stars, for lunch time reading: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2013/47tuc/
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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Have them in circles
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A telescope designed to detect X-ray emission from regions of the Universe.
Introduction
Since its launch on July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory has been NASA's flagship mission for X-ray astronomy, taking its place in the fleet of "Great Observatories."

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