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Chandra Flashback of the Day – NGC 1068: Winds of Change: How Black Holes May Shape Galaxies 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/ngc1068/
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LIGHT: Beyond the Bulb – Image of the Day!
Comet Hale-Bopp
When Comet Hale-Bopp passed through the inner part of our Solar System in 1997, it was bright enough that it could be seen without a telescope or binoculars for over a year.
http://lightexhibit.org/comet.html

Image Credit: Dan Schechter

#IYL2015 #LBTB 
When Comet Hale-Bopp passed through the inner part of our Solar System in 1997, it was bright enough that it could be seen without a telescope or binoculars for over a year. Many skywatchers may have wondered why there were two tails behind this comet. Comets are often referred to as "dirty ...
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Valentina Sherren's profile photophxmarker mark's profile photoCM Albritton's profile photoKurt Lercher's profile photo
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I remember seeing Hailey's comet & felt very excited by the experience - the comet was distant & very small but I felt connected to the universe - it was great
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Lunch with the Stars! Sagittarius A*: NASA's Chandra Finds Milky Way's Black Hole May be Grazing on Asteroids, for lunch time reading: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2012/sgra/
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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In case you missed it! Check out and share some interesting astronomy facts from the Chandra team. Which is your favorite?
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Kyle Rome's profile photoAirNDS's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – SGR 0418+5729: A Hidden Population of Exotic Neutron Stars
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/sgr0418/
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Alonso Hernández's profile photoYvonne Garcia Rice's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – SGR 0418+5729: A Hidden Population of Exotic Neutron Stars
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/sgr0418/
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De Wet Venter's profile photosnewi sedranreb's profile photoMarcos Andrés Barros Ketterer's profile photoRicardo Daniel González's profile photo
 
Muy buenas las investigaciones de Chandra, mis favoritas ★★★★
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – NGC 1068: Winds of Change: How Black Holes May Shape Galaxies 
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/ngc1068/
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Jack Neaves III's profile photoMark Lawrence McRay's profile photoBrian Payne's profile photo
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Ok, pretty good, like the caption...
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Question of the Day!
Concerning magnetars: when their magnetic field causes them to slow down, do they become pulsars for a time before becoming a regular neutron star or do they go straight from a magnetar to a neutron star?

Also, I have heard some references that claim neutron stars that are not part of a multiple star system and are not accreting matter sometimes explode as supernovas. Is this true or do they just exist as a stable silent lump of neutrons with a solid crust of iron nuclei forever?

Answer!
Magnetars and pulsars are both separate sub-classes of neutron star. So when you say "before becoming a regular neutron star", what you may mean is "before becoming an inactive/invisible/dead neutron star".

In any case, this is a very good question. We do think that the magnetic fields in magnetars probably decay, and if they do, it seems reasonable that they pass through a pulsar phase as they do so.

If I had answered this a few days ago, I would have said "except that this has never been observed". However, hot off the presses is a new result in which radio pulsations from a magnetar have been detected! See http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0605429. So it does seem possible that magnetars can have pulsar-like properties. Whether this is a phase in their evolution as their field decays, or is something more complex, is as yet unclear.

In response to your second question, I have not heard any theories in which isolated neutron stars explode. Neutron stars are one of the most stable forms of matter known, so without something dramatic happening (e.g. a lot of accretion or a merger with another neutron star), I don't think anything can be done to a neutron star. After it has slowed down and cooled down, it will remain a dark ball of neutrons for eons.

Eventually all that will remain in the Universe are neutron stars and black holes. The neutron stars will either merge (and form black holes) or be sucked into black holes. Much later the black holes will all evaporate, and the Universe will slowly die a "heat death". 
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phxmarker mark's profile photoCassio Production's profile photo
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Normal, middle-aged stars such as our sun have hot, X-ray- emitting outer atmospheres, or coronas. X-ray observations have proven to be a useful tracer for studying how the turbulent heating near the surface of stars depends on the age, rotation and type of the star, and how the flaring activity of stars changes as stars evolve.
http://chandra.si.edu/xray_sources/normal_stars.html
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AirNDS's profile photoYAB ELY MUR's profile photo
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Buried glaciers, a shredded planet, the fastest spacecraft ever launched & more #astronews
http://spacer.pamhoffman.com/carnival-of-space-402/#.VTUAiLrPyVN
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AirNDS's profile photoLARRY BLAZE B's profile photoMartin Shertis's profile photoYAB ELY MUR's profile photo
 
Like Richard Phillips Feynman said, "If you can't see the inverse-square gravitational field from this, you don't have a soul."  Maybe you can even see Einstein's corrections to the inverse-square fields from this in his tensor equations and the corrections it brought upon Newton's universal law of gravitational.
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Question of the Day!
If Proxima Centauri was in the place or location of our Sun, how much light would it provide to the Earth, let's say at noon? Would it be just as bright at noon with Proxima Centauri as it would with our Sun, or darker?

Answer!
Proxima Centauri is much dimmer than our Sun, about 18,000 times dimmer. Roughly speaking, if you placed Proxima Centauri at the position of the Sun, you would just be able to make out the disk of the star. It would be very dark here on Earth.

If you haven't already, please check out the Chandra webpages on Proxima Centauri:
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2004/proxima/index.html 
A collection of images taken by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, including image descriptions, constellations, an X-ray sky map and comparisons with images in other wavelengths such as optical, radio and infrared.
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Astronomy & Astrophysics Magazine's profile photosnewi sedranreb's profile photo
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Beautiful words from Lao Tzu featuring Perseus A. Learn more here: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/illustrations/pins/perseus_pin.html
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graciela elizabeth herrera's profile photoSubhadip Biswas's profile photoMichael “the joker” Angst's profile photored simon's profile photo
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Bonita frase, gracias a los de la nasa y a l8s del CXRO
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A telescope designed to detect X-ray emission from regions of the Universe.
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Since its launch on July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory has been NASA's flagship mission for X-ray astronomy, taking its place in the fleet of "Great Observatories."

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