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NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory
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This debris field, which glows brightly in X-rays, was left over when a star exploded about 4,500 years ago. This object, known as G299.2-2.9, belongs to a particular class of supernovas called Type Ia. Learn more here: http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2015/g299/

Astronomy Fact #17
In our galaxy, supernovas occur about once every 50 years.

And you thought the wait at the DMV was long.
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NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

➥ Astron/ Cosmo/ Space  - 
 
This debris field, which glows brightly in X-rays, was left over when a star exploded about 4,500 years ago. This object, known as G299.2-2.9, belongs to a particular class of supernovas called Type Ia. Learn more here: http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2015/g299/

Astronomy Fact #17
In our galaxy, supernovas occur about once every 50 years.

And you thought the wait at the DMV was long.
2
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LIGHT: Beyond the Bulb – Image of the Day!
Comet Hale-Bopp was one of the brightest comets in decades, reaching its closest approach to Earth in 1997. It could be seen across the Northern Hemisphere, and it was visible without a telescope or binoculars for about 18 months.
http://lightexhibit.org/bio_image15.html

Image Credit: Donald Lubowich

#IYL2015 #LBTB
Image Credit: Donald Lubowich. Comet Hale-Bopp was one of the brightest comets in decades, reaching its closest approach to Earth in 1997. It could be seen across the Northern Hemisphere, and it was visible without a telescope or binoculars for about 18 months. The white tail is due to sunlight ...
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A Tour of Abell 2597 
Researchers used Chandra to look at some of the largest known galaxies lying in the middle of galaxy clusters. 

Related Link: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2015/a2597/

More Podcasts: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/podcasts/sd.html
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – Sagittarius A*: NASA'S Chandra Catches Our Galaxy's Giant Black Hole Rejecting Food
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/sgra_gas/
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+Dave Stacey​ dunno... Maybe members of the KKK? (Sorry... had to)
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Glossary Term of the Day!
Galactic Cannibalism: A galaxy merger in which a larger galaxy consumes a smaller one.
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The other way round would be a miracle ;-)
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Have them in circles
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This debris field, which glows brightly in X-rays, was left over when a star exploded about 4,500 years ago. This object, known as G299.2-2.9, belongs to a particular class of supernovas called Type Ia. Learn more here: http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2015/g299/

Astronomy Fact #17
In our galaxy, supernovas occur about once every 50 years.

And you thought the wait at the DMV was long.
10
2
Mikey V's profile photoraro kariman's profile photo
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Lunch with the Stars! NGC 6240: Colossal Hot Cloud Envelops Colliding Galaxies, for lunch time reading: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2013/ngc6240/
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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Take a journey through constellations and the celestial objects you can find when you look at them: http://chandra.si.edu/resources/handouts/constellations/m101.html
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Jose Bernardes Filho's profile photophxmarker mark's profile photoChrystele Bouillot's profile photoÇodingyuli MOTALEPE's profile photo
 
Constelação de ORION, ponto de referência para os enígmas do Universo...
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A Tour of Abell 2597 
Researchers used Chandra to look at some of the largest known galaxies lying in the middle of galaxy clusters. 

Related Link: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2015/a2597/

More Podcasts: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/podcasts/sd.html
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phxmarker mark's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – Sagittarius A*: NASA'S Chandra Catches Our Galaxy's Giant Black Hole Rejecting Food
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/sgra_gas/
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João Marcos Brandet's profile photoWorld Space News's profile photo
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Question of the Day!
Is it possible that a black hole could become so isolated that it becomes essentially invisible? 

Answer!
Yes. There are three ways to detect black holes: (1) By observing X-rays or other forms of light emitted by gas falling into a black hole; (2) By observing the gravitational effects of black holes on nearby such as stars; (3) By observing the gravitational lensing of light by a black hole in front of a background star or galaxy. This last method is difficult to prove because other types of objects such as neutron stars are difficult to rule out. The first two methods, which have been used to discover many stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes, require nearby gas or stars. If a black hole is so isolated that no gas or stars are in the vicinity, it will become essentially invisible.
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+Supreme Illuminator I agree that's just our perception of a black hole in a 3d solar system its more like a planet that pulls from all direction and sqeezes everything into itself like a sun until it get a material like iron to our sun that'll cause it to supernova.
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Have them in circles
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beck dolpie's profile photo
Harry Kindt's profile photo
junior tellez's profile photo
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victor lozano's profile photo
‫ابوخليل فهمى‬‎'s profile photo
Çiçekçi Antalya's profile photo
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A telescope designed to detect X-ray emission from regions of the Universe.
Introduction
Since its launch on July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory has been NASA's flagship mission for X-ray astronomy, taking its place in the fleet of "Great Observatories."

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