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NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – Perseus Cluster and Virgo Cluster: NASA's Chandra Observatory Identifies Impact of Cosmic Chaos on Star Birth
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2014/perseusvirgo/
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Luis humberto Henrique's profile photoJulian Claus's profile photo
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Glossary Term of the Day!
Molecule: A tightly bound collection of atoms held together by the electromagnetic fields of the atoms. Molecules, like atoms, emit and absorb photons at specific wavelengths.
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Tammy Ashby's profile photo
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Question of the Day!
Admittedly, dark matter has been inferred from gravitational effects on the unexpected orbital velocities of stars in a galaxy. They do not decrease outwards as predicted by Kepler's Laws. The question is: does the hypothetical dark matter itself rotate? In other words: we "discovered" dark matter from the rotation of stars. How about the rotation of dark matter itself? Does it "matter" that dark matter rotates? ?

Answer!
The dark matter particles are themselves orbiting in the gravitational well created by the cluster mass, just like the stars do, with approximately the same average velocities as stars -- in this regard, there is no difference between these two matter components. In fact, according to a hypothesis seriously considered until recently, the dark matter might consist of brown dwarf stars. It doesn't matter that the individual DM particles move, since (presumably) they are so numerous that the gravitational potential they collectively create stays the same. However, when big chunks of DM orbit each other (as in a merger of clusters), they entrain the hot intracluster gas and galaxies along with them, so we can observe the signs of this motion. 
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Servet Erdem's profile photoVonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photoJernej Košir's profile photoMarcia Disbrow's profile photo
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As for the rest of us:
let's do get it on!

( - _ ^ )

Carry on, +NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory . Please enlighten us on dark matters.
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LIGHT: Beyond the Bulb – Image of the Day!
Cosmic Microwave Background
The cosmic microwave background is the oldest light in the Universe, the afterglow of the Big Bang.
http://lightexhibit.org/cosmic_microwave.html

Image Credit: NASA/WMAP Science Team

#IYL2015 #LBTB
The cosmic microwave background is the oldest light in the Universe, the afterglow of the Big Bang. This ancient light arrives to us not as the type of light we can see with our eyes, but in the form of microwaves, a type of light with wavelengths between radio and infrared light.
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red simon's profile photoVonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photo
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Most stars, including our Sun, will become white dwarfs when they reach their final, burnt-out collapsed state.
http://chandra.si.edu/xray_sources/white_dwarfs.html
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Jernej Košir's profile photoJ. Manuel García's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – NASA's Hubble and Chandra Find Evidence for Densest Nearby Galaxy
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/m60/
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VonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photoLynn Dickson's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – Perseus Cluster and Virgo Cluster: NASA's Chandra Observatory Identifies Impact of Cosmic Chaos on Star Birth
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2014/perseusvirgo/
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Chris Fink (Trek Dad)'s profile photoHelena Swift's profile photo
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We now have 500 images on our Sky Map! Explore the Universe today!
http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/map/index.html
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Mafalda Alves's profile photoVonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photoRough Cibernus's profile photoabdulgader elhasoni's profile photo
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Very cool interactive view
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Lunch with the Stars! Coma Cluster: Clues to the Growth of the Colossus in Coma, for lunch time reading: http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2013/coma/
Information about the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which was launched on July 23, 1999, its mission and goals, and the people who built it.
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VonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photoJernej Košir's profile photo
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Chandra Flashback of the Day – NASA's Hubble and Chandra Find Evidence for Densest Nearby Galaxy
http://chandra.si.edu/photo/2013/m60/
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Brenda McBride's profile photo
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Glossary Term of the Day!
Molecular Cloud Complex: Collection of molecular clouds that spans as much as 150 light years and may contain enough material to make millions of Sun-sized stars.
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VonVictor Valentino Rosenchild's profile photo
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Question of the Day!
How far away is the Andromeda Galaxy and how is this distance determined?

Answer!
The Andromeda Galaxy (otherwise known as M31) is about 2.2 million light years away from us. To measure this distance, a special class of variable stars called cepheid variables was used. These variables are known as "standard candles" because their intrinsic brightness can be accurately measured. If astronomers know the intrinsic brightness of a star, they can estimate how bright it would be at any given distance. Astronomers then used the apparent brightness of the cepheids in Andromeda to work out how far away this galaxy is. 
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patrick clement's profile photoDedy Saputra's profile photoPijush Banerjee's profile photoPHOENIX GAL's profile photo
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Interesting......:)
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A telescope designed to detect X-ray emission from regions of the Universe.
Introduction
Since its launch on July 23, 1999, the Chandra X-ray Observatory has been NASA's flagship mission for X-ray astronomy, taking its place in the fleet of "Great Observatories."

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