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WASHINGTON – April 20, 2016 – It's official – developers are finally building more new apartments than there are renters to fill them.
"The gap between demand and supply in the first quarter was a little larger than anticipated," says Greg Willett, chief economist for market intelligence firm MPF Research, a division of RealPage.
Leading apartment researchers agree that the number of vacant apartments grew in the first quarter of this year, while rents grew at a slower pace. Some temporary uncertainty about the U.S. economy may have helped cause this weaker demand; however, market researchers have expected the vacancy rate to creep higher for a long time.
Economy jitters
Demand for rental apartments stumbled in the first months of this year, according to MPF. The number of occupied apartments only grew 20,077 during the period. That's less than half the 40,000 to 50,000 new occupied apartments that the industry has gotten used to seeing each first quarter over that last few years. Occupancy tends to lose a little momentum at the end of the year, and then hold steady or climb a bit at the start of the next year, according to MPF.
"Uncertainty about the nation's near-term economic outlook appears to be constraining new household formation and demand for all forms of housing," says Willett. "The slight backtracking seen in the first quarter is significant because it runs counter to the normal pattern of seasonality in performance statistics."
Vacancy inches up, as expected
Time will tell whether the improving outlook for the U.S. economy, which continues to produce roughly 200,000 new jobs a month, will lead to some renewed demand for apartments. However, top research firms agree that the percentage of vacant apartments will continue to inch higher this year, though the vacancy rate is still lower that the 95 percent level that most experts call "fully occupied."
"Today's occupancy rate is very tight," says Willett. The percentage of vacant apartments rose 20 basis points to reach 4.3 percent in the first quarter, according to MPF. Other research firms reports similar findings. The percentage of vacant apartments rose 10 basis points to reach 4.5 percent, on average, in the first quarter of 2016, according to New York City-based research firm Reis Inc. That's up from a low of 4.2 percent last year.
"The expectation was that demand would fall a little short of completions in 2016, leading to occupancy that's down a bit," says Willett. "We're on the expected path."
Developers opened 200,142 new apartments over the last 12 months. That's the most new apartments opened in any 12-month period since 1988, when 216,167 new units came on-line, according to Reis.
Most of the new apartments are at class-A properties opening in top markets. Roughly one third of the apartments slated for delivery this year are in Dallas/Fort Worth, Houston, New York City, Seattle-Tacoma and Washington, D.C., according to brokerage firm Marcus & Millichap. Because of all this luxury construction, the vacancy rate for class-A apartments was 4.1 percent in the first quarter compared to 3.0 percent for class-B and class-C properties, according to the researchers at Marcus & Millichap.
"All of the increase in vacancy that we've been seeing has come from the class-A space," says Ryan Severino, senior economist with Reis.
Rents rise anyway
Even as vacancy rises, apartment owners are still able to increase their rents, however. Apartment rents grew 0.9 percent in the first quarter, compared to the quarter before, and rents grew 5.0 percent compared to the year before, according to MPF.
Rents are still rising, but much more slowly, according to Reis. Effective rents grew just 0.5 percent in the first quarter from the quarter before, compared to increases of at least 1.0 percent per quarter over the last few years. Effective rents were 4.5 percent higher in the first quarter compared to the year before, though most of that increase happened in 2015.
WASHINGTON – April 20, 2016 – It's official – developers are finally building more new apartments than there are renters to fill them. "The gap between demand and supply in the first quarter was a little larger than anticipated," says Greg Willett, chief economist for market intelligence firm MPF Research, a division
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WASHINGTON (AP) – April 19, 2016 – Construction of new homes fell in March by the largest amount in five months, with weakness in all regions of the country except the Northeast.
Home construction dropped 8.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.09 million units, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday. It was the third decline in the past four months and left construction at its slowest point since October.
Applications for permits to build new homes, a good indicator of future activity, dropped 7.7 percent in March to an annual rate of 1.09 million units.
Construction activity has been volatile this year, dropping in January and March but posting a 6.9 percent rise in February. Housing construction has been helping fuel the overall economy, and economists expect the sector to rebound in the coming months.
Construction of single-family homes declined 9.2 percent in March to a seasonally adjusted 764,000. Apartment construction was down 7.9 percent to a rate of 325,000 units.
The overall drop of 8.8 percent was the biggest one-month decline since a fall of 11.3 percent in October.
The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index released Monday was unchanged at a reading of 58 in April, reflecting an overall optimistic outlook for new homes as the industry heads into the all-important spring sales season.
By region of the country, construction jumped 61.3 percent in the Northeast in March, following a big drop in February. Sales were down in all other areas, led by a 25.4 percent fall in the Midwest, a 15.7 percent drop in the West and an 8.4 percent decline in the South.
WASHINGTON (AP) – April 19, 2016 – Construction of new homes fell in March by the largest amount in five months, with weakness in all regions of the country except the Northeast. Home construction dropped 8.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.09 million units, the Commerce Department reported Tuesday.
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MIAMI – April 12, 2016 – America’s top cities and ZIP codes for luxury home listings and sales kept a stable pace of growth over the last year, according to Coldwell Banker Previews International’s latest annual Luxury Market Report.
Florida cities landed in the most top spots for high-priced real estate, with luxury sales posting double-digit growth in Miami, Naples and Palm Beach. Two cities – Lake Worth and Wellington – also landed in the top 20 list for luxury home sales worth $10 million or more for the first time.
The uptick in luxury sales occurred across the country, though certain pockets showed the highest increases. In Austin, Texas, for example, sales of $1 million-plus homes last year jumped 32 percent year-over-year thanks to an increase in its tech and entertainment industries.
However, Fort Lauderdale followed closely behind with a 31 percent increase in $1 million-plus home sales, and Seattle saw a 30 percent increase.
Closed sales
$1,000,000-plus home sales: Florida cities in top 20
8. Naples (1,135 sales with a 93% average list price to sales price ratio)
10. Miami (1,007 with a 92% ratio)
14. Fort Lauderdale (789 with a 90% ratio)
18. Miami Beach (650 with a 92% ratio)
$5,000,000-plus home sales: Florida cities in top 20
4. Miami Beach (95 sales with a 91% average list price to sale price ratio)
5. Naples (87 with a 92% ratio)
12. Palm Beach (43 with an 89% ratio)
13. Miami (43 with an 89% ratio)
18. Boca Raton (33 with an 88% ratio)
$10,000,000-plus home sales: Florida cities in top 20
5. Miami Beach (25 sales with a 90% average list price to sale price ratio)
8. Naples (16 with an 89% ratio)
10. Palm Beach (13 with an 87% ratio)
11. Miami (13 with an 87% ratio)
17. Delray Beach (7 with a 90% ratio)
19. Wellington (7 with a 76% ratio)
20. Lake Worth (6 with an 89% ratio)
Listings
$1,000,000-plus listings: Florida cities in top 20
2. Miami (1,654 listings)
3. Miami Beach (1,473)
4. Naples (1,146)
9. Fort Lauderdale (878)
10. North Miami Beach (810)
13. Boca Raton (662)
18. Sarasota (455)
$5,000,000-plus listings: Florida cities in top 20
2. Miami Beach (365 listings)
6. Naples (120)
7. Miami (106)
11. North Miami Beach (91)
12. Boca Raton (87)
13. Palm Beach (81)
15. Fort Lauderdale (75)
18. Key Biscayne (52)
$10,000,000-plus listings: Florida cities in top 20
2. Miami Beach (152)
9. Naples (33)
10. Palm Beach (33)
13. Miami (24)
14. North Miami Beach (22)
17. Boca Raton (18)
18. Key Biscayne (18)
19. Fort Lauderdale (18)
MIAMI – April 12, 2016 – America's top cities and ZIP codes for luxury home listings and sales kept a stable pace of growth over the last year, according to Coldwell Banker Previews International's latest annual Luxury Market Report. Florida cities landed in the most top spots for high-priced real estate, with
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The Department of Justice announced the settlement Friday, as Wells Fargo admitted it hid loans from HUD, contributing to the housing market crash of 2008.
The bank accepted responsibility for falsely certifying that some residential home mortgage loans were eligible for Federal Housing Administration (FHA) insurance when they were not, forcing the government to pay insurance claims on the defaulted loans.
"This administration remains committed to holding lenders accountable for their lending practices," HUD Secretary Julian Castro said. "The $1.2 billion settlement with Wells Fargo is the largest recovery for loan origination violations in FHA's history. Yet, this monetary figure can never truly make up for the countless families that lost homes as a result of poor lending practices."
In their suit, the U.S. alleged Wells Fargo hired temporary and inexperienced staff to approve loans in order to increase its volume and bolster their profits.
The bank admitted to only self-reporting 300 problematic loans to the FHA between October 2005 and December 2010, when the company had instead identified more than 2,900 problematic loans during that time period.
Kurt Lofrano, a former Wells Fargo vice president who was also named in the government's complaint, admitted to overseeing a team of bankers who certified bad loans and failed to report them, the Justice Department said.
"This matter is not just a failure by Wells Fargo to comply with federal requirements in FHA's Direct Endorsement Lender program – it's a failure by one of our trusted participants in the FHA program to demonstrate a commitment to integrity and to ordinary Americans who are trying to fulfill their dreams of homeownership," HUD Inspector General David A. Montoya said.
WASHINGTON – April 11, 2016 – Wells Fargo agreed to pay a $1.2 billion settlement for failing to disclose faulty loans to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Department of Justice announced the settlement Friday, as Wells Fargo admitted it hid loans from HUD, contributing to the housing market
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WASHINGTON – April 8, 2016 – Builders say they’re responding to homebuyer requests by offering greater efficiency in the design and function of the home.
“Today’s new homes include features that will help homeowners reduce energy consumption and enhance the conveniences of modern living,” says Ed Brady, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). “Our builders are telling us that energy efficiency continues to be a top demand from consumers.”
NAHB recently surveyed builders about the features they’re most likely to include in new homes this year, and four of the top 10 features focused on energy efficiency: low-E windows, Energy Star-rated appliances and windows, and programmable thermostats.
According to NAHB’s latest survey of homebuyer preferences, Energy Star appliances and windows, as well as an Energy Star rating for the entire house, are among the top five most-wanted features. In fact, homebuyers are willing to pay more for a home if they can get lower utility costs in return. On average, they will pay an additional $10,732 up front to save $1,000 a year in utilities, according to NAHB.
Other popular features that builders said they’re likely to add to homes include a walk-in closet in the master bedroom, laundry room, great room (kitchen-family room-living room) and a central island and granite countertop in the kitchen.
WASHINGTON – April 8, 2016 – Builders say they're responding to homebuyer requests by offering greater efficiency in the design and function of the home. "Today's new homes include features that will help homeowners reduce energy consumption and enhance the conveniences of modern living," says Ed Brady, chairman of the National Association
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Hop by The Village to meet and take complementary photos with the Easter Bunny, enjoy arts and crafts, face painting and balloon animals. Don’t forget to bring your baskets and collect Easter eggs from The Village merchants. Saturday, March 26th | 1pm-4pm
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WASHINGTON (AP) – April 20, 2016 – Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities.
Surveys show that most Americans under 35 lack adequate savings for downpayments. The result is that many will likely be forced to delay homeownership and to absorb significant debt loads if they do eventually buy.
Steadily rising home values in recent years have eclipsed pay increases, making it especially difficult to buy in major growth areas for jobs, such as San Francisco, Denver and Seattle.
Nationally, 37 percent of millennial renters have saved nothing at all for a downpayment, according to a survey of 30,000 renters being released Wednesday by Apartment List, a company specializing in rental home searches. At the same time, 79 percent of millennial renters say they aspire to own a home, illustrating a troublesome gap between expectations and financial realities.
Even those diligent enough to set aside money are still short the cash to buy a home.
Among larger metro areas, millennial renters who are saving have put aside an average of just $5,830. This marks less than one-fifth the savings needed for the typical 20 percent downpayment on a starter home costing $175,000. The lack of savings raises doubts about whether the under-35 crowd will also delay marriage and children, said Andrew Woo, a data scientist at Apartment List.
One possibility – already evident in some markets – is that first-time buyers are making smaller downpayments and paying mortgage insurance or slightly higher interest rates on mortgages. Excess housing debt roughly a decade ago inflated a housing bubble and then triggered a market crash that led to the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression more than 80 years ago.
"A lot of millennials are not saving enough for a 20 percent downpayment for a home," Woo said. "What does that do for our financial system – especially since we had the financial crisis less than 10 years ago? Are we willing to let homebuyers be highly leveraged like they were before?"
Millennials not only entered a job market still healing from the downturn but also arrived with high student debt burdens, with averages approaching $30,000. Fifty-three percent of homebuyers under 35 last year said that student loans had delayed their purchases, according to a survey released last month by the National Association of Realtors.
Based on home prices, many millennials won't be able to buy homes in the next five years with their accumulated savings. Assuming a 20 percent downpayment, it would take 20.5 years in San Francisco, 11.4 years in Denver, 8.2 years in Seattle and seven years in the Boston area.
Not all areas were so out of reach. In such metro areas as Philadelphia, St. Louis and Cincinnati, the required savings for those who have put aside money would take less than two years.
Some buyers are pursuing alternatives that allow substantially lower downpayments. Programs such as Fannie Mae's HomeReady let buyers put down as little as 3 percent. But only buyers who earn less than 80 percent of a metro area's median income are eligible.
The program has aided first-time buyers in places such as Washington, D.C., where millennial renters with savings are still almost nine years shy, on average, of having enough money for a 20 percent downpayment on a starter home in the region.
"It's just absolutely critical – people either wouldn't be able to secure a good rate or able to buy altogether," said David Toaff, a loan officer at First Home Mortgage in Bethesda, Maryland.
WASHINGTON (AP) – April 20, 2016 – Short of savings and burdened by debt, America's millennials are struggling to afford their first homes in the face of sharply higher prices in many of the most desirable cities. Surveys show that most Americans under 35 lack adequate savings for downpayments. The result is
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Fla. has two ‘top 10’ cities for RE investing
ORLANDO, Fla. – April 13, 2016 – HomeVestors – the We Buy Ugly Houses people – and Local Market Monitor published their Best Markets Top Ten List for Real Estate Investing for the first quarter of 2016, and two Florida cities made the list: Orlando and Tampa.
To identify top investment cities, the study ranks them based on increased job opportunities in the past year. The overall national average increase was 1.9 percent.
Two Texas cities topped the list: Dallas-Plano-Irving followed by San Antonio. Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan fell to third place, with Orlando in fourth place. Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia came in at No. 5.
“Good job growth is driving prices higher in our markets, mainly in business services but also tourism (Orlando, San Antonio), finance (Charlotte, Dallas) and manufacturing (Grand Rapids),” says Ingo Winzer, president and founder of Local Market Monitor.
While home prices have recovered in Texas, Florida and California, the report predicts that some local markets in each state will be over-priced in another year.
“Over the last year, we have seen an increase in population and job growth,” says David Hicks, HomeVestors co-president. “However, housing prices are increasing significantly faster than incomes. As a result, home sales are slowing, limiting the housing demand. Therefore, investors need to be careful where and when they invest.”
“Yesterday’s opportunity becomes today’s risk once prices move higher than they should,” says Winzer. “This is especially true for investors in rental properties and especially now that the deep discounts at which properties could be bought have largely disappeared.”
“Investors always need to think hard, but in this environment they also can’t afford to think too long,” says Ken Channell, co-president of HomeVestors.
1Q 2016 best markets top 10 list for real estate investing
1.Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas
2.San Antonio, Texas
3.Grand Rapids-Wyoming, Michigan
4.Orlando, Florida
5.Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, Georgia
6.Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord, North Carolina
7.Salt Lake City, Utah
8.Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro, Tennessee
9.Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Florida
10.Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona
ORLANDO, Fla. – April 13, 2016 – HomeVestors – the We Buy Ugly Houses people – and Local Market Monitor published their Best Markets Top Ten List for Real Estate Investing for the first quarter of 2016, and two Florida cities made the list: Orlando and Tampa. To identify top investment cities,
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WALNUT CREEK, Calif. – April 12, 2016 – The likelihood of home price declines across the United States over the next two years remains low at 5 percent, according to Spring 2016 Housing and Mortgage Market Review published by Arch Mortgage Insurance Company (Arch MI). For most of Florida, the risk is even lower.
The report by Arch MI attempts to gauge the likelihood that home prices will be lower in two years based on recent economic and housing market data. Despite the low overall risk of home price declines, however, some areas in the “Energy Patch” states (coal-, oil- or natural gas- producing) remain at heightened risk. While home prices probably won’t decline even there, they may experience slower than normal economic and home price growth, according to Arch.
Statewide, Florida’s risk of a price decline over the next two years is only 2 percent in 24 Florida counties, including Miami-Dade and Broward. And the likelihood in a handful of other places, such as Palm Beach County, is only 3 percent.
“Apart from a subset of energy extraction states, home prices should rise faster than inflation thanks to strong fundamentals,” says Dr. Ralph G. DeFranco, Arch MI’s Chief Economist. “Positives include strong affordability, home prices generally below their historical relationship with incomes, U.S. job growth of more than 2 million jobs a year, and a low levels of construction relative to growing demand.”
On a state level, Alaska, North Dakota, Wyoming and West Virginia currently have the highest risk of home prices declines. Total employment continues to weaken in those states, even as home prices continue to rise.
Report risk highlights
North Dakota has the highest Arch MI Risk Index value at 47 (a 47 percent change of any-sized price decline over the next two years), primarily due to a 4 percent drop in year-over-year total employment, the largest decline in the nation. North Dakota’s home prices are estimated to be overvalued by 22 percent relative to historic norms, likely due to the once-roaring oil fracking boom.
• Wyoming has an Arch MI Risk Index value of 40. The state is the nation’s largest coal producer and, as recently as late 2014, mining jobs represented 10 percent of the state’s total employment. Since then, mining employment has fallen 20 percent and workers are now leaving the state.
• West Virginia has an Arch MI Risk Index value of 35 and registered the nation’s second largest year-over-year decline in total employment (-1.5 percent). Housing in the state is weakening, with falling existing-home sales and an uptick in foreclosures.
• Alaska’s Arch MI Risk Index value came in at 31. Low energy prices have pushed the nation’s most oil-dependent economy into recession and government layoffs. In spite of this, home prices and sales have held up well to date.
• Louisiana has an Arch MI Risk Index Score of 30. While the unemployment rate fell to 5.8 percent, the total employment rate fell 0.3 percent. Additionally, home sales have fallen.
• New Mexico registered a score of 30 on the Arch MI Risk Index due to the potential risk of recession caused by government- and energy-related job losses.
• Oklahoma posted an Arch MI Risk Index Score of 24. The state is less diversified than neighboring Texas and total employment is falling slightly. Home price growth is below national averages, but accelerated in the fourth quarter of 2015.
• Texas registers the lowest risk of the Energy Patch states with an Arch MI Risk Index Score of 19, thanks to a more diversified economy. Employment in Texas remains positive but has weakened in recent months. Home prices continue to grow faster than the national average, leading to heightened risk scores for several Texas communities.
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. – April 12, 2016 – The likelihood of home price declines across the United States over the next two years remains low at 5 percent, according to Spring 2016 Housing and Mortgage Market Review published by Arch Mortgage Insurance Company (Arch MI). For most of Florida, the risk is even
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A new poll from Fannie Mae shows a large drop in the number of consumers who think now is a good time to sell a home. Fannie Mae's Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI), a survey of 1,000 Americans, saw decreased 2.5 points to 80.2 in March. Four of the six HPSI components showed a March drop as the survey revealed a more negative consumer outlook on the economy.
The largest drop was the share of consumers who think it's a good time to sell a home, which fell by 8 percentage points. Despite the Bureau of Labor Statistics' March employment report showing strong job creation and continued expansion of the labor force, HPSI respondents surveyed in March noted that their confidence about not losing their job decreased 7 percentage points, falling from an all-time survey high in February.
In addition, the Household Income component fell 4 percentage points with fewer consumers reporting that their income was significantly higher than it was 12 months ago.
"Growing pessimism over the last three months about the direction of the economy seems to be spilling over into home-purchase sentiment," says Doug Duncan, senior vice president and chief economist at Fannie Mae. "The gap between the share of consumers who think the economy is on the wrong track and the share who think it is on the right track has widened, nearly matching its reading last August, when concerns regarding China and oil prices led to the biggest stock market plunge in years.
"In turn, we saw dips this month in income-growth perceptions, attitudes about the home-selling climate, and job confidence – all of which contributed to the lowest HPSI reading in the last year and a half," he says.
HPSI March highlights
The March HPSI is down 1.5 points year-to-year
The share of respondents who say that it's a good time to buy a house fell 2 percentage points to 33%; more Americans say it's a bad time to buy
The percentage who say it's a good time to sell a house fell 8 percentage points to negative 1% – for the first time in a year, more felt it was a bad time to sell than a good time
The share of respondents who say that home prices will go up rose 1 percentage point to 34%, breaking a downward trend from the last few months
The net share of those who say mortgage interest rates will go down rose 5 percentage points, but it's still at negative 45%, so fewer consumers think mortgage rates will go down
The share of respondents who say they're not concerned with losing their job fell 7 percentage points to 68%
The net share of respondents who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago fell 4 percentage points to 11%
WASHINGTON – April 11, 2016 – The inventory of for-sale homes might get even tighter. A new poll from Fannie Mae shows a large drop in the number of consumers who think now is a good time to sell a home. Fannie Mae's Home Purchase Sentiment Index (HPSI), a survey of 1,000
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NEW YORK – April 6, 2016 – As the broader mortgage market remains in the doldrums, lenders are again touting cash-out refinances and home-equity lines of credit that allow homeowners to tap into their home equity when they need extra cash.
TD Bank, for example, has been trying in recent weeks to persuade shoppers at hardware stores along the U.S. East Coast to start taking cash out of their homes again. The TD Bank tour bus is equipped with a galley kitchen and iPads for homeowners to use to begin the application process.
Banks are trying to offset faltering mortgage originations and a refinancing wave that is fizzling out, betting that home-equity line of credit offers will resonate with borrowers whose homes are worth more than they were a few years ago, but who need cash for renovations or other expenses because they held onto the home longer than expected.
Lenders extended just over $156 billion in home-equity lines of credit last year, the largest dollar amount since 2007, according to new figures from mortgage-data firm CoreLogic Inc. – a 24 percent increase from 2014 and a 138 percent spike from 2010 when new approvals hit a low point.
NEW YORK – April 6, 2016 – As the broader mortgage market remains in the doldrums, lenders are again touting cash-out refinances and home-equity lines of credit that allow homeowners to tap into their home equity when they need extra cash. TD Bank, for example, has been trying in recent weeks to
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Event Description: An Evening with Los Lobos Thursday, March 17 at 8 p.m. With their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music, Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy Award winning band (Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance) by the time they recorded their major label debut “How Will The Wolf Survive?” in 1984.Three decades, two more Grammys, a worldwide smash single (“La Bamba”) and thousands of rollicking performances across the globe later, Los Lobos is surviving quite well – and still jamming with the same raw intensity as they had when they began in a garage in 1973.
Event Description: An Evening with Los Lobos Thursday, March 17 at 8 p.m. With their powerhouse mix of rock, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues and traditional Spanish and Mexican music, Los Lobos were already East L.A. neighborhood legends, Sunset Strip regulars and a Grammy Award winning band (Best Mexican-American/Tejano Music Performance) by the
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Have them in circles
500 people
Gene Riemenschneider's profile photo
Jimmy Holmes's profile photo
Barnett Capital Realty's profile photo
Village Walk Home Naples's profile photo
James Wilkerson's profile photo
Armaan Somani's profile photo
Laurie Denlea's profile photo
Joe Keany's profile photo
Commercial Mortgage Mark's profile photo
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Naples Florida Real Estate
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Looking for real estate in the Naples, Florida area? Let us help you find your dream home, visit our website: http://naplesrealestate.me